November 29, 2014, 05:31:35 AM

Author Topic: Show your Bird Portraits  (Read 812777 times)

Mr Bean

  • Canon 6D
  • *****
  • Posts: 417
    • View Profile
Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #7020 on: November 25, 2014, 06:21:35 PM »
Golden Whistler, female. Went to photograph a Pardalote or two, came back with a Golden Whistler. The Pardalotes had disappeared. Next time :)

Whistlers have a rather large, blocky head for their size, and a large eye.  The scientific name for the genus, Pachycephala, means thick-head.


Nice photo. If I remember correctly the male Golden Whistlers are very lively singers. I had to google the Pardalotes. I don't recall seeing those.
Thanks GraFax. I didn't see (or hear) the male. A more colourful bird, compared to the female.
5D mk3 with grip, 300 f4 L, 100 IS Macro L, 50 f1.4, 50 f1.8, 40 f2.8 pancake, 35 f2, 1.4x TC III, Zeiss 15mm f2.8, 24 f1.4 L
580EX II, MT-24EX Macro Flash
EF 12mm and 25mm II Extension tubes

canon rumors FORUM

Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #7020 on: November 25, 2014, 06:21:35 PM »

sanjosedave

  • Rebel T5i
  • ****
  • Posts: 128
    • View Profile
Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #7021 on: November 25, 2014, 11:33:38 PM »
6D; ISO 3200; 70-200 2.8 @ 105mm; f 2.8; 1/4000, little LR, some Nik. Background is a Crepe Myrtle that is just turning colors

Jack Douglas

  • 1D Mark IV
  • ******
  • Posts: 938
    • View Profile
Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #7022 on: November 26, 2014, 08:04:00 PM »
Those of you who are long time regulars may remember me showing up on CR not quite 2 years ago after purchasing my 6D.  I had shot one year with a Nikon D5100 and was really getting the bug.  I felt insanely uneasy having just spent $7k on the 300 2.8 II.

Uneasiness is long gone and I don't have any regrets on my purchases for sure and am enjoying learning.
Yesterday, I decided to buy a 600 EX- RT but I haven't used flash for 20 years.  I liked the idea of fill flash for wildlife and some of you have previously advised me in that direction.  So, now I need to come up to speed and am reading and experimenting.

Being late November here in Alberta it gets pretty dark around 4 PM and to boot it's been cloudy.  The result is that often I get shots from my observatory on the barn with natural light, at ISO 12800, which I don't really like.  It's just occurring to me that to have fill flash you have to have good natural light in the first place.

Anyway, that's the background and here are shots at sundown, 6D 70-200 F2.8 II X1.4 (HSS) that I'd appreciate feedback on.  Would these be considered acceptable or is the flash creating too much artificiality and if so any suggestions to correct that.  I might be able to rig up some kind of reflector for bounce but being outdoors it's not that easy, not to mention winter winds and snow.  Plain honest commentary is fine! :)

Jack



6D  24-70 F4  70-200 F2.8 II  300 F2.8 II  1.4X III  2X III

Click

  • Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS II
  • *******
  • Posts: 3460
    • View Profile
Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #7023 on: November 26, 2014, 08:06:24 PM »
Very nice series Jack  :)

GraFax

  • EOS M2
  • ****
  • Posts: 206
    • View Profile
Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #7024 on: November 26, 2014, 08:52:28 PM »
Anyway, that's the background and here are shots at sundown, 6D 70-200 F2.8 II X1.4 (HSS) that I'd appreciate feedback on.  Would these be considered acceptable or is the flash creating too much artificiality and if so any suggestions to correct that.  I might be able to rig up some kind of reflector for bounce but being outdoors it's not that easy, not to mention winter winds and snow.  Plain honest commentary is fine! :)

Jack
I really like the shot of the Pileated. The flat lighting works for that one by separating the bird from the background. I'm weak on incorporating fill flash but I think the idea of using bounce to create some depth is a good one. I think depth is going to be your biggest issue unless there is more natural light. If you knew where the subject was going to be you may be able to rig up a second remotely triggered off camera flash unit.  Sorry, that's all I've got I'm afraid. I think you are off to a good start though. That 300 2.8 sure is sharp.  :)

Jack Douglas

  • 1D Mark IV
  • ******
  • Posts: 938
    • View Profile
Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #7025 on: November 26, 2014, 10:01:01 PM »
Thanks click.  Grafox, thanks for the comments.  I didn't realize that HSS was available and that one was not limited to, in the case of the 6D, 180th sec.  This opens a new world to me with the telephoto.  That Canon flash is certainly nice and being slightly used I only paid $400.  Now, this brings me to another item.  Some folk have mention a Better Beamer.  How important is this to a 300 or is the 200 zoom limitation of the 600 EX adequate?

Jack
6D  24-70 F4  70-200 F2.8 II  300 F2.8 II  1.4X III  2X III

Krob78

  • 1D X
  • *******
  • Posts: 1326
  • When in Doubt, Press the Shutter...
    • View Profile
Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #7026 on: November 27, 2014, 12:02:20 AM »
5D MkIII - Non Breeding Yellow Rumped Warbler
EF 100-400mm
f/5.6
ISO-800
1/800th
400mm
Ken

5D Mark III, 100-400L, 70-200 2.8L II, 24-105L, 16-35L IS, 17-40L, 85mm 1.8, Samy 14mm 2.8,  600 EX-RT, 580EX II, 430EX II, 1.4X III, 2.0X III

canon rumors FORUM

Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #7026 on: November 27, 2014, 12:02:20 AM »

Krob78

  • 1D X
  • *******
  • Posts: 1326
  • When in Doubt, Press the Shutter...
    • View Profile
Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #7027 on: November 27, 2014, 12:14:29 AM »
Lunch time!
Ken

5D Mark III, 100-400L, 70-200 2.8L II, 24-105L, 16-35L IS, 17-40L, 85mm 1.8, Samy 14mm 2.8,  600 EX-RT, 580EX II, 430EX II, 1.4X III, 2.0X III

Valvebounce

  • 1D X
  • *******
  • Posts: 1039
  • Still can't use most of it to it's full potential!
    • View Profile
Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #7028 on: November 27, 2014, 04:27:02 AM »
Hi Jack.
Very nice shots, I think the flash is serving to enable a shot that would otherwise be for you, at an unacceptable ISO, therefore it really doesn't matter that much about the slightly flat flash lighting.
I'm sure someone will correct me if I'm wrong, but I think if you are within the reach distance of the flash, it matters very little about the focal length of the lens, perhaps the flash light is a little more spread with respect to the area covered by the lens, but I think the ETTL will take pretty good care of that.
Do the birds come to basically the same spot? Could you move the flash closer, cheap lead or not so cheap RT remote trigger?

Cheers, Graham.


Those of you who are long time regulars may remember me showing up on CR not quite 2 years ago after purchasing my 6D.  I had shot one year with a Nikon D5100 and was really getting the bug.  I felt insanely uneasy having just spent $7k on the 300 2.8 II.

Uneasiness is long gone and I don't have any regrets on my purchases for sure and am enjoying learning.
Yesterday, I decided to buy a 600 EX- RT but I haven't used flash for 20 years.  I liked the idea of fill flash for wildlife and some of you have previously advised me in that direction.  So, now I need to come up to speed and am reading and experimenting.

Being late November here in Alberta it gets pretty dark around 4 PM and to boot it's been cloudy.  The result is that often I get shots from my observatory on the barn with natural light, at ISO 12800, which I don't really like.  It's just occurring to me that to have fill flash you have to have good natural light in the first place.

Anyway, that's the background and here are shots at sundown, 6D 70-200 F2.8 II X1.4 (HSS) that I'd appreciate feedback on.  Would these be considered acceptable or is the flash creating too much artificiality and if so any suggestions to correct that.  I might be able to rig up some kind of reflector for bounce but being outdoors it's not that easy, not to mention winter winds and snow.  Plain honest commentary is fine! :)

Jack
7D + Grip, 40D + Grip, 20D, EF-S 17-85 Kit lens, EF 70-200 f2.8 L IS II USM, EF 2x III, Sigma 150-500, Sigma 17-70 f2.8-4 C, 50mm f1.8, 550EX some Filters Remotes Macro tubes Tripod heads etc!
20D, BG-E2N, 17-85mm, 50mm are pre loved. :)
(300D Saved a holiday, E-FS 18-55 Cosina 100-300 retired)

Valvebounce

  • 1D X
  • *******
  • Posts: 1039
  • Still can't use most of it to it's full potential!
    • View Profile
Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #7029 on: November 27, 2014, 04:29:13 AM »
Hi Ken.
Very nice timing, looks like a bit of a mouthful!

Cheers, Graham.

Lunch time!
7D + Grip, 40D + Grip, 20D, EF-S 17-85 Kit lens, EF 70-200 f2.8 L IS II USM, EF 2x III, Sigma 150-500, Sigma 17-70 f2.8-4 C, 50mm f1.8, 550EX some Filters Remotes Macro tubes Tripod heads etc!
20D, BG-E2N, 17-85mm, 50mm are pre loved. :)
(300D Saved a holiday, E-FS 18-55 Cosina 100-300 retired)

jrjr99

  • Power Shot G7X
  • **
  • Posts: 8
    • View Profile
Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #7030 on: November 27, 2014, 04:41:14 PM »

Jack Douglas

  • 1D Mark IV
  • ******
  • Posts: 938
    • View Profile
Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #7031 on: November 27, 2014, 05:19:07 PM »
jrjr99, like the heron shot.

Graham, you're right.  I just feel short changed at ISO 12800 so the flash is a step up, regardless of the negatives.  However, if the result is not appreciated by whomever, that takes away the enjoyment.  In time I'll be able to gauge that.

Now, if I could afford another 600 EX-RT, yes I could position it to catch return visitors to the area I'm shooting towards, although that's a little challenging, unlike the on-camera flash.  It's a clump of trees that many birds love and close enough to get decent shots, like 10 - 20 feet.  I also have a couple props that are attracting some customers and they are closer and would be easy to roughly aim a second flash at.

Jack
6D  24-70 F4  70-200 F2.8 II  300 F2.8 II  1.4X III  2X III

ERHP

  • EOS M2
  • ****
  • Posts: 154
    • View Profile
    • ERH Photography
Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #7032 on: November 27, 2014, 08:15:21 PM »
Jack, as this is in the backyard, have you considered a full time lighting source?  In a largely controlled environment shooting from a fixed position, it might be be the answer you are looking for, plus much easier to meter.  You can also have the light in the exact color cast and diffused as desired.  This also moves the light reflection to another part of the eye, rather than centered. 

Awesome shot of the Pileated!  I'm hoping to catch some during Christmas with the folks as two pairs reside on the homestead.

Canon 1D X / 5D MK III and some lenses

http://erhp.smugmug.com/

canon rumors FORUM

Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #7032 on: November 27, 2014, 08:15:21 PM »

Jack Douglas

  • 1D Mark IV
  • ******
  • Posts: 938
    • View Profile
Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #7033 on: November 27, 2014, 09:02:11 PM »
Thanks ERHP,

BTW, the Pileated almost always announce themselves with that flicker like call that is pretty loud.

Your suggestions are worthy but what is happening is a brainwave that was to take maybe a day to implement is turning into MANY days, while of course I was supposed to be doing various jobs, not playing! ;)

Never the less, I think this one needs to be taken advantage of based on the possibilities.  One is macro shots of birds admiring themselves in the see-through mirror - well more likely they'll be fighting themselves.  :)

For anyone thinking of a blind, I highly recommend a slightly pricey see-through mirror as opposed to the film that can be applied to glass or acrylic.  My 1/4" thick 6 X 16 piece cost me around $30.  Having such a window makes life so much easier.

Jack
6D  24-70 F4  70-200 F2.8 II  300 F2.8 II  1.4X III  2X III

canon rumors FORUM

Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #7033 on: November 27, 2014, 09:02:11 PM »