July 24, 2014, 07:06:43 PM

Author Topic: Horses / Horseriding etc  (Read 15600 times)

CharlieB

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Re: Horses / Horseriding etc
« Reply #45 on: August 24, 2013, 09:54:47 AM »
I'm not into horse photography.   But, I was a good friend of Elizabeth "Betty" Bell in her latter years while she was in Florida, and she was one of the foremost equine oil-on-canvas (or acrylic too I guess) artists of her time.

All the shots here made me reflect upon her friendship, and I think she would have approved.  BTW, she used Canon cameras to photograph her subjects - for their details, then put them into scenes and poses of her own creation.  I know - because I sold her the cameras, and thats how our friendship developed.

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Re: Horses / Horseriding etc
« Reply #45 on: August 24, 2013, 09:54:47 AM »

scottkinfw

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Re: Horses / Horseriding etc
« Reply #46 on: August 24, 2013, 11:21:30 AM »
Girl kissing horse, very nice emotion!

Nice pics.

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drmikeinpdx

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Horse Photography as a business?
« Reply #47 on: August 24, 2013, 11:57:17 AM »
Lots of great photos in this thread!  I'm interested in expanding my part time photo business into horse photography.  There are many horse owners in my area and my friends in the horse culture tell me that a photographer might find a good market for his or her services here.  I recently picked up a book on horse photography that is old, but very helpful.  It's "Photographing Horses and other livestock" by Darol Dickinson.  Apparently, doing good horse photography is pretty complex, which appeals to me.

Anyway, I'd like to know if any of you are doing horse photography as a business?  And if so, do you have any tips to pass along?  I have no idea at this point about what to charge and how to package my services to appeal to horse owners.

Here's a portrait I did last month.  This was inside an arena which was open on one side, providing nice soft light.  I used a Sigma 50 at 1.4 on my 5D3.  BTW, Darol Dickinson is a big proponent of using long lenses for horse photos in order to properly show the proportions of the horse.  He likes 135 and 200 mm lenses.  I was rather surprised at that. 



I guess I'll need a different business name and logo for the horses.  LOL
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rpt

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Re: Horses / Horseriding etc
« Reply #48 on: August 24, 2013, 12:57:33 PM »
We can't all be Thoroughbreds ...


They always say you don't get a bad horse with big ears, but I don't know if that applies to donkeys !  ;D
Well, my experience has been that donkeys have bad-ass big ears unless they are not thoroughbred...
 ;)

DARSON

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Re: Horses / Horseriding etc
« Reply #49 on: January 17, 2014, 05:45:17 AM »
Topic is old but i just found it.
See recent shot from Show jumping competition
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jdramirez

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Re: Horses / Horseriding etc
« Reply #50 on: January 17, 2014, 07:02:14 AM »
Topic is old but i just found it.
See recent shot from Show jumping competition
5D Mark III + 70-200 F2.8 IS II L USM + 1.4III Tele
@1/4000sec F4 ISO 250

This isn't a critique... but usually if I'm photographing something like this where motion is obvious, I usually compose the shot so the direction they are heading is open rather than where they have been.  So I would have the horse and rider to the left of the shot rather than the right. 

Is that just a personal preference on my part or was there a specific reason you composed the shot that way that has to do with one of these unspoken rules of photography that I pick up off the streets?
Upgrade  path.->means the former was sold for the latter.

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Sporgon

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Re: Horses / Horseriding etc
« Reply #51 on: January 17, 2014, 08:34:10 AM »

This isn't a critique... but usually if I'm photographing something like this where motion is obvious, I usually compose the shot so the direction they are heading is open rather than where they have been.  So I would have the horse and rider to the left of the shot rather than the right. 

Is that just a personal preference on my part or was there a specific reason you composed the shot that way that has to do with one of these unspoken rules of photography that I pick up off the streets?

+1

The horse's technique in impeccable, the photograper's less so.  ;)

Pity 'cos the timing is spot on; this is the point when the horse looks at it's best over a fence.

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Re: Horses / Horseriding etc
« Reply #51 on: January 17, 2014, 08:34:10 AM »

Orangutan

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Re: Horses / Horseriding etc
« Reply #52 on: January 17, 2014, 09:15:41 AM »
I usually compose the shot so the direction they are heading is open rather than where they have been.  So I would have the horse and rider to the left of the shot rather than the right. 

I was thinking the same: it looks like the horse is jumping out of the frame.  You might be able to make the shot more intense by cropping it tight on horse and rider in portrait orientation.

Great timing, though.
« Last Edit: January 17, 2014, 09:17:37 AM by Orangutan »

Pugshot

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Re: Horses / Horseriding etc
« Reply #53 on: January 17, 2014, 09:46:44 AM »
Quote
This isn't a critique... but usually if I'm photographing something like this where motion is obvious, I usually compose the shot so the direction they are heading is open rather than where they have been.  So I would have the horse and rider to the left of the shot rather than the right. 

Is that just a personal preference on my part or was there a specific reason you composed the shot that way that has to do with one of these unspoken rules of photography that I pick up off the streets?

Quote
I was thinking the same: it looks like the horse is jumping out of the frame.  You might be able to make the shot more intense by cropping it tight on horse and rider in portrait orientation.

This is just my two cents, but rules are made to be broken. I think there's plenty of space on the right, and the image is balanced by the negative space on the left. Plus, if you like rules, the Rule of Thirds was obeyed because the rider's head is at the intersection of the imaginary gridlines. Finally, the horse and rider are sharp, the scene is well-exposed, and the capture was made at exactly the right moment. Well done, Darson!

Orangutan

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Re: Horses / Horseriding etc
« Reply #54 on: January 17, 2014, 09:55:10 AM »
Quote
I was thinking the same: it looks like the horse is jumping out of the frame.  You might be able to make the shot more intense by cropping it tight on horse and rider in portrait orientation.

This is just my two cents, but rules are made to be broken. I think there's plenty of space on the right, and the image is balanced by the negative space on the left.

It's not a rule, it's a personal aesthetic preference.  If Darson likes it as it is that's fine.  I just thought I'd offer something else to consider.

jdramirez

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Re: Horses / Horseriding etc
« Reply #55 on: January 17, 2014, 10:01:02 AM »
Quote
This isn't a critique... but usually if I'm photographing something like this where motion is obvious, I usually compose the shot so the direction they are heading is open rather than where they have been.  So I would have the horse and rider to the left of the shot rather than the right. 

Is that just a personal preference on my part or was there a specific reason you composed the shot that way that has to do with one of these unspoken rules of photography that I pick up off the streets?

Quote
I was thinking the same: it looks like the horse is jumping out of the frame.  You might be able to make the shot more intense by cropping it tight on horse and rider in portrait orientation.

This is just my two cents, but rules are made to be broken. I think there's plenty of space on the right, and the image is balanced by the negative space on the left. Plus, if you like rules, the Rule of Thirds was obeyed because the rider's head is at the intersection of the imaginary gridlines. Finally, the horse and rider are sharp, the scene is well-exposed, and the capture was made at exactly the right moment. Well done, Darson!

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DARSON

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Re: Horses / Horseriding etc
« Reply #56 on: January 17, 2014, 10:57:24 AM »
Topic is old but i just found it.
See recent shot from Show jumping competition
5D Mark III + 70-200 F2.8 IS II L USM + 1.4III Tele
@1/4000sec F4 ISO 250

This isn't a critique... but usually if I'm photographing something like this where motion is obvious, I usually compose the shot so the direction they are heading is open rather than where they have been.  So I would have the horse and rider to the left of the shot rather than the right. 

Is that just a personal preference on my part or was there a specific reason you composed the shot that way that has to do with one of these unspoken rules of photography that I pick up off the streets?
Thanks for feedback
I get your point and deep down I'm feeling that it is more interesting composition which you are suggesting. I was limited by focal length and my position in relation to rider.
If that would be the case would you rather not taking the shot and relocate to other point?
Below is sample with rider on left side of the frame
Cropped
Focal length 280mm F4
1/4000sec same set 
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DARSON

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Re: Horses / Horseriding etc
« Reply #57 on: January 17, 2014, 11:00:18 AM »
Quote
This isn't a critique... but usually if I'm photographing something like this where motion is obvious, I usually compose the shot so the direction they are heading is open rather than where they have been.  So I would have the horse and rider to the left of the shot rather than the right. 

Is that just a personal preference on my part or was there a specific reason you composed the shot that way that has to do with one of these unspoken rules of photography that I pick up off the streets?

Quote
I was thinking the same: it looks like the horse is jumping out of the frame.  You might be able to make the shot more intense by cropping it tight on horse and rider in portrait orientation.

This is just my two cents, but rules are made to be broken. I think there's plenty of space on the right, and the image is balanced by the negative space on the left. Plus, if you like rules, the Rule of Thirds was obeyed because the rider's head is at the intersection of the imaginary gridlines. Finally, the horse and rider are sharp, the scene is well-exposed, and the capture was made at exactly the right moment. Well done, Darson!
Thanks Pugshot
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Re: Horses / Horseriding etc
« Reply #57 on: January 17, 2014, 11:00:18 AM »

jdramirez

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Re: Horses / Horseriding etc
« Reply #58 on: January 17, 2014, 11:11:42 AM »
I agree with orangutan... crop it into a portrait orientation. 


Topic is old but i just found it.
See recent shot from Show jumping competition
5D Mark III + 70-200 F2.8 IS II L USM + 1.4III Tele
@1/4000sec F4 ISO 250

This isn't a critique... but usually if I'm photographing something like this where motion is obvious, I usually compose the shot so the direction they are heading is open rather than where they have been.  So I would have the horse and rider to the left of the shot rather than the right. 

Is that just a personal preference on my part or was there a specific reason you composed the shot that way that has to do with one of these unspoken rules of photography that I pick up off the streets?
Thanks for feedback
I get your point and deep down I'm feeling that it is more interesting composition which you are suggesting. I was limited by focal length and my position in relation to rider.
If that would be the case would you rather not taking the shot and relocate to other point?
Below is sample with rider on left side of the frame
Cropped
Focal length 280mm F4
1/4000sec same set
Upgrade  path.->means the former was sold for the latter.

XS->60D->5d Mkiii:18-55->24-105L:75-300->55-250->70-300->70-200 f4L USM->70-200 f/2.8L USM->70-200 f/2.8L IS Mkii:50 f/1.8->50 f/1.4->100 f/2.8L->85mm f/1.8 USM->135L -> 8mm ->100L

yorgasor

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Re: Horses / Horseriding etc
« Reply #59 on: January 17, 2014, 11:15:35 AM »
Topic is old but i just found it.
See recent shot from Show jumping competition
5D Mark III + 70-200 F2.8 IS II L USM + 1.4III Tele
@1/4000sec F4 ISO 250

This isn't a critique... but usually if I'm photographing something like this where motion is obvious, I usually compose the shot so the direction they are heading is open rather than where they have been.  So I would have the horse and rider to the left of the shot rather than the right. 

Is that just a personal preference on my part or was there a specific reason you composed the shot that way that has to do with one of these unspoken rules of photography that I pick up off the streets?
Thanks for feedback
I get your point and deep down I'm feeling that it is more interesting composition which you are suggesting. I was limited by focal length and my position in relation to rider.
If that would be the case would you rather not taking the shot and relocate to other point?
Below is sample with rider on left side of the frame
Cropped
Focal length 280mm F4
1/4000sec same set

I'm still processing the 2100+ photos I took last weekend from a table tennis tournament, and while I follow this rule of leaving the space where the person is looking, after a while all the photos start to look the same.  So, while it's good to follow these rules (this photo looks particularly compelling because it does follow the rules), it's always good to shake things up a little bit for variety. 

One thing that might be interesting is to try for your next session is a panning action shot, where you use a low shutter speed (maybe 1/30th) and move the camera to follow the horse as it runs by.  I hear it's pretty tricky to get right, I plan on attending some local races this spring to see what I can get.

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Re: Horses / Horseriding etc
« Reply #59 on: January 17, 2014, 11:15:35 AM »