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Ring Lights

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Quasimodo:

--- Quote from: pwp on February 10, 2013, 05:21:04 PM ---Yes I used to rent Profoto ringlights too, very powerful and built like a tank. But if you need good, controllable power for meaningful portrait shoots, the Profoto can be too strong, even dialed right down. On my 2400 Profoto floorpack I had to run another head on an extension lead out the door just to get the power low enough. Nuts.

The little speedlight style ringlights are very low powered and purpose designed for macro/medical work. As a portrait ringlight they just don't have the horsepower unless you are happy to work with very big apertures and high ISO setings.

Enter the happy medium from Paul C Buff, the maker of Alien Bees and the incredible Einsteins.
http://www.paulcbuff.com/abr800.php They have a very useful power range and OMG check out the price! Five cents change from $400.

http://www.shutterbug.com/content/alienbees%E2%80%99-ringflash-attractive-lighting-option
http://photo.net/photography-news-forum/00KPXA
http://www.ppmag.com/web-exclusives/2007/06/review-supplement-alienbees-ab.html

-PW

--- End quote ---


I looked at your links and this is interesting. I have no experience in using these types (apart from trying a plastic thing attached to a 580 once, american company I believe...). In the second link it argues that the use of ring lights give a distinct look that you only get from these.. Do you or any other have any examples, and also an explanation of how they differ from other types of lighting? (apart from the near no-shadows, also mentioned in the article).

Quasimodo:

--- Quote from: privatebydesign on February 10, 2013, 06:10:29 PM ---This link might help.

http://strobist.blogspot.com/2009/10/ray-flash-vs-orbis-vs-alienbees-abr800.html

Small flash style accessories really do lack the power to do very much, though they can be fun. One thing they are very good for is controlling contrast by filling shadows on axis, once you have done the narrow dof thing then that really is their best use.

Here is an example of the narrow dof on axis "look", done with one of the cheap $200 options (I forget which!).

--- End quote ---


Sweet photo! I will look at the link tomorrow :)

agierke:
here are examples with the PCB ABR800. fun strobe unit. perfect for the budget minded portraitist.

Quasimodo:

--- Quote from: privatebydesign on February 10, 2013, 06:10:29 PM ---This link might help.

http://strobist.blogspot.com/2009/10/ray-flash-vs-orbis-vs-alienbees-abr800.html

Small flash style accessories really do lack the power to do very much, though they can be fun. One thing they are very good for is controlling contrast by filling shadows on axis, once you have done the narrow dof thing then that really is their best use.

Here is an example of the narrow dof on axis "look", done with one of the cheap $200 options (I forget which!).

--- End quote ---


Again, thank you.

I looked at the link and the links from there, among the video.

Hmmm...  I love the look you have on this shot. The other ones posted further down are great too, but I see that they cast shaddows (not that that in itself is wrong when going for that).. Why would one use a ring flach instead of a beaty dish (in studio). My impression is that you can get the same effect with a deep beauty dish, but also because of the deepness and the curve of it eliminates the shaddows behind the subject much more? Or are these really two different things for different looks? Is the main benefit of the ringflash that you can have the lens through the light, thus giving other angles of light?

Please forgive me my ignorance.

paul13walnut5:
A favour to an aspiring model friend:


Taken with the cheapo Centon MR-20 discuss earlier, and the nifty fifty.  So decent results needn't cost the earth.

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