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Author Topic: Canon Confirms 70D; Future of Semi-Pro DSLR is FF  (Read 29577 times)

jrista

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Re: Canon Confirms 70D; Future of Semi-Pro DSLR is FF
« Reply #75 on: February 04, 2013, 02:16:01 PM »
yes, you can crop down a photo from a FF to give you the same "reach" as a crop, but you can't crop down video on a FF to get the same reach as a crop.

That is an incomplete statement, at best. Reach and crop are different things. You can crop a FF image to give you the same Field of View as an APS-C image. Crop/framing/FoV are a compositional factor. Reach is something entirely different, and intrinsically dependent on pixel density. Reach implies more detail, and you don't get more detail simply by cropping the 6D, 5D, 1D...hell, even cropping the D800 won't give you the same amount of detail as the current 7D is capable of. If you crop the 6D FF sensor to the same FoV as an APS-C sensor, you have plain and simply cropped. You did not gain reach. The 6D pixel density is significantly lower than that of say the 18mp 7D. Reach can only be gained with higher pixel density. The only time your statement is true is when the FF sensor in question has the same or greater density as a comparable APS-C sensor. THEN, and ONLY THEN, could you crop and have the same reach as the APS-C.
« Last Edit: February 04, 2013, 02:33:30 PM by jrista »

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Re: Canon Confirms 70D; Future of Semi-Pro DSLR is FF
« Reply #75 on: February 04, 2013, 02:16:01 PM »

nolken

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Re: Canon Confirms 70D; Future of Semi-Pro DSLR is FF
« Reply #76 on: February 04, 2013, 02:38:19 PM »
that is why i quoted "reach". because it is not the same thing. someone else mentioned it on an earlier post, so for simplicity's sake I went with it.

jrista

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Re: Canon Confirms 70D; Future of Semi-Pro DSLR is FF
« Reply #77 on: February 04, 2013, 02:50:07 PM »
that is why i quoted "reach". because it is not the same thing. someone else mentioned it on an earlier post, so for simplicity's sake I went with it.

Muddying down the terms, when they (crop and reach) both have very specific meanings just adds to the confusion, though. Reach and Crop are not interchangeable terms. They are all too often used interchangeably by individuals who do not fully understand the meaning of reach...but they really should be used in the appropriate contexts. Lets alleviate confusion, rather than try to be simple. ;)



As for whether there will be a 7D Mark II, there is this:

*UPDATE* During my current travels, I missed an interview Masaya Maeda gave in Japan about the 7D’s successor. Below is a translated part of the interview that talks about the EOS 7D Mark II. It does reaffirm our thoughts that the 7D Mark II will enter new territory.

DKW: As for the readers of DigiKame Watch, there are many who are waiting for the EOS 7D’s sucessor. Up through the release of last year’s major firmware update, there were many who felt that a new model with even better specs would be released shortly…

MM: Yes, they would be correct. For us, it’s about looking at what the camera has the potential to be and then adding that to what it can currently do. I do think the current model is still very attractive to buyers. And while we are, of course, developing its successor, it’ll be one that incorporates a certain number of innovative technologies. We will not be putting out a product with merely better specs, but one that has evolved into new territory. But then again, we’re not talking about something a long time from now either.

Emphasis added by me. From the horses mouth, Canon IS developing the 7D's successor. The mention that it will use innovative technologies does not, by any means, indicate that the 7D II will be FF. On the contrary, I believe it means that the 7D II could very well be Canon's first camera to use a sensor manufactured with their 180nm Copper interlink sensor tech with lightpipe technology...which is fairly innovative indeed if that is the case. It would be the first APS-C sized sensor to use lightpipe technology, which to date has only been used on much smaller form factor sensors. It would also be Canon's first commercial DSLR product that uses 180nm process, so also innovative for Canon on that front.

x-vision

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Re: Canon Confirms 70D; Future of Semi-Pro DSLR is FF
« Reply #78 on: February 04, 2013, 03:38:48 PM »
A 7Dii has a value proposition problem. 

Well, it depends.

As I said in another tread, the whole point of the 7D series is to offer advanced specs at an affordable price.
Make it too expensive (e.g. $2000+) and the 7DII will have a value proposition problem.

If too expensive, the 7DII will get out of the enthusiasts' price range.
It will also become too expensive for pros looking for an inexpensive (but capable) second body.

That's why I've been saying that the 7DII will be priced at $1800 max.
At this price (and lower), it won't have a value proposition problem - provided that the sensor is very good.
Of course if priced at $1800, the 7DII will not be spec'd as a 1DIV replacement. That's for sure.
« Last Edit: February 04, 2013, 03:40:50 PM by x-vision »

jrista

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Re: Canon Confirms 70D; Future of Semi-Pro DSLR is FF
« Reply #79 on: February 04, 2013, 04:18:17 PM »
A 7Dii has a value proposition problem. 

Well, it depends.

As I said in another tread, the whole point of the 7D series is to offer advanced specs at an affordable price.
Make it too expensive (e.g. $2000+) and the 7DII will have a value proposition problem.

If too expensive, the 7DII will get out of the enthusiasts' price range.
It will also become too expensive for pros looking for an inexpensive (but capable) second body.

That's why I've been saying that the 7DII will be priced at $1800 max.
At this price (and lower), it won't have a value proposition problem - provided that the sensor is very good.
Of course if priced at $1800, the 7DII will not be spec'd as a 1DIV replacement. That's for sure.

I think your mostly right. I think an actual $2000 ($1999) introductory price, maybe even a $2100 introductory price, wouldn't be unthinkable, though. I know a number of people who have purchased the 6D as a step up from the Rebel XSi. Granted, the 6D is not the same class of camera as the 7D, however these friends are indeed novice to enthusiast, not pros. Most have limited budgets. The price tag of the 6D was not enough to scare them off, despite its limited feature set.

There is also the real-world inflation in commodity prices to factor in. Base metals, precious metals, rare earth metals, and a whole host of other materials used in the manufacture of advanced CMOS technology and other electronics (hell, even the camera bodies) have all increased in price over the last four years. Some of them considerably, some even hundreds of percent. Even when the amount of commodity material used in, say, an image sensor is very small, a several hundred percent increase in cost can have a measurable impact. Canon could simply reduce their profit margin to maintain an $1799 price tag, but that would likely impact shareholder value as well. I see a compromise around a $1999, maybe $2099 price tag being realistic, and still something the target market for the 7D II could swallow.

Don Haines

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Re: Canon Confirms 70D; Future of Semi-Pro DSLR is FF
« Reply #80 on: February 04, 2013, 07:26:41 PM »
you'll know that there is NEVER any end to the need for reach. You can always, always, always use more reach.

+10 - As someone who finds 4000mm (through telescope) woefully insuffient, I agree with you...
« Last Edit: February 04, 2013, 09:31:37 PM by Don Haines »
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Re: Canon Confirms 70D; Future of Semi-Pro DSLR is FF
« Reply #81 on: February 04, 2013, 07:39:54 PM »

The simple fact of the matter, though, is the 7D gives BETTER IQ than the cheapest Canon APS-C. The notion that sensor is the sole factor in IQ is fundamentally flawed, and why so many on this forum do not understand the true value an APS-C camera like the 7D. There are numerous other features offered with the 7D, not the least of which are its superior AF system and higher frame rate over the xxxD and xxD lines, that lead to better results in more cases. An increase in the number of usable outcomes is a very valuable thing, and more often than not those features are in addition to the image sensor, not solely because of the image sensor.

Let's drop the notion that sensor is the end-all, be-all of image quality. It is not. I'd offer that frame rate and AF system are critical, if not the most critical, factors in IQ for a significant amount of photographic endeavors. Pretty much anything that involves automatically locking focus on non-stationary subjects, or requires actively tracking subjects in motion, can greatly benefit from the additional features the 7D offers over the xxD and xxxD lines. I'd also be willing to bet that the keeper rate for the 7D is far higher than that from either a 60D or 650D, or any other prior version of those lines, thanks to its superior features...despite the fact that the image sensor is the same.

Iv'e always regarded the lens as the most important factor in image quality.... It doesn't matter what camera you have, you need the right lens for the job if you are going to do it well. I smile to myself when I hear someone with a 5D3 and Lglass comparing themselves to a rebel with a kit lens and saying it's the sensor that gives them the better picture.... swap lenses and see what happens...

I did a bunch of comparison shots for resolving power about two years ago between a 5D2 and a 7D.... In poor light the 5D2 was always the winner. With good light and a crappy lens, the 5D2 gave better resolving power, but with a good lens, the 7D out-resolved the 5D2.... Different tool... different strengths... different weaknesses.
If one tool did it all, Canon would only have one model.... and it would be identical to the equavelent sony, nikon, panasonic, and Olympus model.
« Last Edit: February 04, 2013, 08:11:40 PM by Don Haines »
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Re: Canon Confirms 70D; Future of Semi-Pro DSLR is FF
« Reply #81 on: February 04, 2013, 07:39:54 PM »

jrista

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Re: Canon Confirms 70D; Future of Semi-Pro DSLR is FF
« Reply #82 on: February 04, 2013, 08:34:54 PM »

The simple fact of the matter, though, is the 7D gives BETTER IQ than the cheapest Canon APS-C. The notion that sensor is the sole factor in IQ is fundamentally flawed, and why so many on this forum do not understand the true value an APS-C camera like the 7D. There are numerous other features offered with the 7D, not the least of which are its superior AF system and higher frame rate over the xxxD and xxD lines, that lead to better results in more cases. An increase in the number of usable outcomes is a very valuable thing, and more often than not those features are in addition to the image sensor, not solely because of the image sensor.

Let's drop the notion that sensor is the end-all, be-all of image quality. It is not. I'd offer that frame rate and AF system are critical, if not the most critical, factors in IQ for a significant amount of photographic endeavors. Pretty much anything that involves automatically locking focus on non-stationary subjects, or requires actively tracking subjects in motion, can greatly benefit from the additional features the 7D offers over the xxD and xxxD lines. I'd also be willing to bet that the keeper rate for the 7D is far higher than that from either a 60D or 650D, or any other prior version of those lines, thanks to its superior features...despite the fact that the image sensor is the same.

Iv'e always regarded the lens as the most important factor in image quality.... It doesn't matter what camera you have, you need the right lens for the job if you are going to do it well. I smile to myself when I hear someone with a 5D3 and Lglass comparing themselves to a rebel with a kit lens and saying it's the sensor that gives them the better picture.... swap lenses and see what happens...

That's it exactly. The sensor on any Rebel from the last 7 years will produce phenomenal photos when paired with good glass. It's just that as pixel density has increased, so has the demand on lenses. Try out the 100-400mm lens on any one of Canon's 18mp APS-C cameras, and they will all look somewhat soft. Pop on the EF 300mm f/2.8 L II, and (assuming good light) you'll see the sharpest, clearest, most vibrant photos you could imagine. The quality of a photo from the 7D wouldn't be any different from the quality of any FF camera at the same subject distance. The 7D or any 18mp Rebel would actually capture more detail than any current FF sensor on the market from any brand.

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Re: Canon Confirms 70D; Future of Semi-Pro DSLR is FF
« Reply #83 on: February 04, 2013, 09:27:04 PM »

The simple fact of the matter, though, is the 7D gives BETTER IQ than the cheapest Canon APS-C. The notion that sensor is the sole factor in IQ is fundamentally flawed, and why so many on this forum do not understand the true value an APS-C camera like the 7D. There are numerous other features offered with the 7D, not the least of which are its superior AF system and higher frame rate over the xxxD and xxD lines, that lead to better results in more cases. An increase in the number of usable outcomes is a very valuable thing, and more often than not those features are in addition to the image sensor, not solely because of the image sensor.

Let's drop the notion that sensor is the end-all, be-all of image quality. It is not. I'd offer that frame rate and AF system are critical, if not the most critical, factors in IQ for a significant amount of photographic endeavors. Pretty much anything that involves automatically locking focus on non-stationary subjects, or requires actively tracking subjects in motion, can greatly benefit from the additional features the 7D offers over the xxD and xxxD lines. I'd also be willing to bet that the keeper rate for the 7D is far higher than that from either a 60D or 650D, or any other prior version of those lines, thanks to its superior features...despite the fact that the image sensor is the same.

Iv'e always regarded the lens as the most important factor in image quality.... It doesn't matter what camera you have, you need the right lens for the job if you are going to do it well. I smile to myself when I hear someone with a 5D3 and Lglass comparing themselves to a rebel with a kit lens and saying it's the sensor that gives them the better picture.... swap lenses and see what happens...

I did a bunch of comparison shots for resolving power about two years ago between a 5D2 and a 7D.... In poor light the 5D2 was always the winner. With good light and a crappy lens, the 5D2 gave better resolving power, but with a good lens, the 7D out-resolved the 5D2.... Different tool... different strengths... different weaknesses.
If one tool did it all, Canon would only have one model.... and it would be identical to the equavelent sony, nikon, panasonic, and Olympus model.

They can't swap lenses, the rebel's kit lens is EF-S =P Aside from my smart remark, +1. A better lens does make the entire, overall image better, even more so with an L prime.
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Don Haines

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Re: Canon Confirms 70D; Future of Semi-Pro DSLR is FF
« Reply #84 on: February 04, 2013, 09:42:50 PM »

They can't swap lenses, the rebel's kit lens is EF-S =P Aside from my smart remark, +1. A better lens does make the entire, overall image better, even more so with an L prime.
As long as you stay away from EF-S, the lenses swap.. All my lenses, except an EF-S 18-200, work on a 7D and a 5D2.. Some EF-S lenses, not made by Canon, do fit on the 5D2, but the vigneting is phenomenally terrible. My friend tried a Sigma 10-22 on the 5D2....like looking through a porthole :)

The problem with APS-C is that due to the high pixel density, you need Lglass quality to take advantage of that pixel density, yet the normal kit lenses offered fall far short of the required quality.
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jrista

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Re: Canon Confirms 70D; Future of Semi-Pro DSLR is FF
« Reply #85 on: February 04, 2013, 10:24:40 PM »
flawed logic.. you will always have more reach with a crop and a 1.4 TC. :)

And how many people are actually using a 1.4TC on an APS-C body? Its quite rare imho. I can also say add more n more extension rings if u just care about reach....flawed logic


Only advantage of APS-C is reach and price. But u dont have to save a lot more to get a better FF body than the endlevel APS-C. Yes, i hate APS-C or anything smaller than FF :P Still using it tough  ::)
I just think there are too many Canon DSLR models and levels. They should have entry, advanced and pro. Why there is like super entry (xxxxD), normal entry (xxxD), upper entry (xxD) advanced (7D) upper advance (6D) end Advanced (5D) and pro (1dX)? Its just too many imho. And all APS-C produce the same image quality. mostly the rebels even produce better images then the 7D cuz they get updated more often  ::)
I would NEVER get a 7D if it gives the same IQ as the cheapest DSLR from Canon. Paying so much money just for a better body material is ridicoulus imho. Or wow 10 FPS? Press and pray is not my style... If i wanna be somewhat professional id at least get a 5D.

Regarding the use of teleconverters on APS-C. I use them. Hell, I've used teleconverters with both the EF 300mm f/2.8 L II and the EF 500mm f/4 L II on my 7D. I use both the 1.4x and 2x, and if Canon made a 1.7x, I'd use that too. Primes frequently have far more to offer from an IQ standpoint than sensors do. A lot of people complain about how "soft" the 7D is...that is true, sometimes...when using older lenses. Slap on pretty much ANY Mark II lens on a 7D, and that "soft" disappears, replaced by some of the sharpest detail you've ever seen. The Canon 18.1mp APS-C sensor is a good sensor...however it is a very, very high density sensor. If you use inferior glass with it, all the flaws OF THE GLASS are revealed. The only real drawback of the 7D is noise, and then, only at ISO settings above 2500 (and even then, with the increasing availability of advanced noise removal tools, such as Topaz DeNoise 5 (which has stellar random noise removal AND debanding!), high ISO noise is becoming less and less of a problem.)

To put some images behind my claims. Below are two photos of House Finches. One is the normal red morph, the other an orange morph. Same bird, otherwise, same size (maybe a slight size benefit to the orange morph) with the same amount of base detail...feathers, beak, eye. Both of these were shot at pretty much the same distance (around 7 feet...red morph maybe a few inches farther), ISO, and aperture, although the red one was up in a tree so my focal plane was shifted a bit, thus slightly blurring the top of its head and the back of its right wing. The body feathers and beaks are in focus on both birds. Both birds were positioned within the same rough area of the lens...slightly off center towards the upper left corner. Both full-scene images below are cropped to roughly the same area (few pixels difference in width and height).

Both photos shot with my 7D, ISO 400, f/6.3, in my backyard. The red morph was shot with my EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 L IS lens with a full stop of additional light at twice the shutter speed (1/1600s, which should be an IQ advantage!) The orange morph was shot with a rented EF 500mm f/4 L IS II. Both lenses had AFMA adjustments for this body.

Here are the full images, scaled down to 900 pixels. Even at this level, you can see the difference in quality between the two photos can be seen. The orange morph is sharper and clearer (probably thanks to better microcontrast.)




At 100% crop (1:1 zoom, PIXEL PEEPING for all you pixel peepers!), the difference in IQ is beyond clear. The 100-400mm lens produces far softer results (even ignoring the slightly out of focus crest on the red morph). This kind of softness is what I've come to expect from the 100-400mm lens at less than f/8, and beyond f/8 diffraction again softens the image. (There is roughly the same amount of noise in both photos. It is more apparent in the red morph due to the increased lens softness, which blurs detail but does NOT blur noise. Clear, sharp detail tends to trump noise. ;) The background in the red morph also provides a greater area of <= 18% gray tone, where noise becomes most apparent...the orange morph has a greater area of pixels > 18% tone.)




Scaled down to web size, the red morph photo is good enough. Most people won't notice the slight softness. From a print standpoint, I probably would not print the red morph photo, however the orange morph photo is definitely printable. It is not only printable, it could also easily be blown up two, maybe three times larger, and still be high quality, even higher quality than the red morph photo printed at original size!

The notion that SENSOR is the only real factor in IQ is, in my opinion, fundamentally flawed. Sensor is A FACTOR in IQ, but not the most important. I would say the lens is the most important IQ factor. The AF system and frame rate are second. The image sensor is third. My reasoning for this is as follows:

  • If the lens is soft, then no amount of post-processing will really fix that. A soft lens produces soft pictures, and with a high density sensor, that softness just becomes more apparent.
  • Clear detail eats noise for breakfast; Noise eats soft detail for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. You can kind of fix noise in soft detail, however beyond a certain point your just going to increase the softness of your detail thanks to the inferiority of NR vs. Better Lens ®. Better NR tools, or significant upgrades to existing NR tools, arrive on the market every few months or so. Topaz DeNoise 5 with Debanding can offer some significant NR before it starts to blur detail...but eventually, one way or another, you'll hit that threshold. Better lens will always trump better NR tools, IMO.
  • Noise becomes most apparent in pixels with less than 18% gray tone (relative to the physical full-well capacity of the sensor's photodiodes at ISO 100, or half signal strength). Above 18% gray tone, noise quickly becomes a background factor. In other words, noise boils down to the total amount of light on the sensor. With say an expensive f/4 supertelephoto lens, you get twice as much light on the sensor as with a cheaper f/5.6 supertelephoto lens. Assuming all other exposure factors are the same, the consequence of the slower lens is a higher ISO setting. That implies a lower maximum signal strength, and thus a lower 18% gray level, relative to FWC @ ISO 100.

The last point is probably the most sensor-dependent point. Noise is a factor of photons per full well, and the number of photon strikes per pixel (thanks to poisson distribution). Assuming a technologically level playing field...i.e. all of the same Q.E. enhancing technology is employed in sensors of all sizes: In a smaller sensor with smaller pixels, FWC is reached with fewer photons than in a larger sensor with larger pixels. Assuming an 18mp sensor in both APS-C and FF formats, FWC in an APS-C sensor might be around 30,000 electrons, while an FF sensor might be around 90,000 electrons. The larger pixels give the FF sensor a greater light gathering capacity in any given unit time, so assuming an identical exposure value, both sensors should saturate to FWC in the same exposure time. The difference is that the FF sensor has three times as many electrons to convert into the same number of digital levels (2^14, or 16384 digital levels, to be exact). Since most noise is photon shot noise (random noise that follows poisson distribution), the more photons per pixel you have to work with the better your noise performance at higher and higher ISO settings (or for pixels below the 18% gray tone threshold). The same would go for sensors of identical size and pixel density but different Q.E. If you had one APS-C sensor with 40% Q.E. and one with 80% Q.E., the latter would gather twice as many photons per pixel, even though the pixels are the same size.

Dylan777

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Re: Canon Confirms 70D; Future of Semi-Pro DSLR is FF
« Reply #86 on: February 05, 2013, 12:24:18 AM »
I can see fuji and sony will take a BIG bite in smaller body models build with ff and crop sensors - X100(s) and RX-1 are great gear on the market.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2013, 01:45:52 AM by Dylan777 »
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Re: Canon Confirms 70D; Future of Semi-Pro DSLR is FF
« Reply #87 on: February 05, 2013, 03:57:36 AM »
I can see fuji and sony will take a BIG bite in smaller body models build with ff and crop sensors - X100(s) and RX-1 are great gear on the market.

I agree.  In particular, in the $600 to $1200 price range, there are so many good cameras around that I'm amazed Canon maintains such market dominance.  But they must be getting a little worried.  And this is one of the reasons why Canon will (hopefully) return the 70D to its roots - a more rugged, feature packed, well built, action and wildlife orientated camera for those with around $1200-$1400 to spend.

Great autofocusing capabilities is the only significant advantage Canon holds over many competitors.  I'm pretty sure it will be the foundation of their camera bodies and marketing efforts in coming years.  That way, when people go into a shop to buy their first serious camera, the salesperson will agree that the new Sony or Olympus or Panasonic or Fuji takes great photos.  Just not of anything that moves.  The 70D, however, not only takes great photos, but also has a state of the art AF system.  They'll never miss an important shot again.  Add in weather sealing, WIFI, GPS, dual card slots etc etc and, as long as it comes in different colours, Canon can lock in another three years as market leader. 

Also, it must have hurt Canon's feelings for everyone to say the D7000 was better than the 60D - especially given that it was cheaper.  I doubt they want a repeat of that.
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Re: Canon Confirms 70D; Future of Semi-Pro DSLR is FF
« Reply #87 on: February 05, 2013, 03:57:36 AM »

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Re: Canon Confirms 70D; Future of Semi-Pro DSLR is FF
« Reply #88 on: February 05, 2013, 04:14:22 AM »
Also, it must have hurt Canon's feelings for everyone to say the D7000 was better than the 60D - especially given that it was cheaper.  I doubt they want a repeat of that.

:-) I doubt Canon's feeling can be hurt, only their profits. They knew exactly what they were doing with the 60d - obviously people rather "upgrade" (to the better 7d) than switch to Nikon. And they just did repeat it, with the 6d/5d3/600d combination...

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Re: Canon Confirms 70D; Future of Semi-Pro DSLR is FF
« Reply #89 on: February 05, 2013, 08:04:12 AM »
The problem with APS-C is that due to the high pixel density, you need Lglass quality to take advantage of that pixel density, yet the normal kit lenses offered fall far short of the required quality.
Compact cameras have far greater pixel density than APS-C.

I think it is fundamentally flawed to claim that "designing good lenses for high pixel density is hard/expensive". Just like it is fundamentally flawed to claim that "designing good lenses for large image circles is hard/expensive". What seems to be the case is that designing good lenses for high pixel density and large image circle simultaneously (i.e. "many megapixels") is hard.

I dont think that a good lense for a (12MP) 5D classic ought to be all _that_ different in price from that for a good (12MP) m4/3 camera (aside from economy of scale, shipping and such things). The FF lense would have to cover a relatively large image circle with moderate MTF, while the m43 lense would have to cover a smaller image circle with higher MTF.

-h

Take a peek at Jrista's excellent post above...

We have reached the point where the resolving power of high megapixel FF cameras and APS-C cameras are approaching the manufacturing limits of lenses. A series 2 prime chunk of Lglass exceeds this limit, most GOOD Lglass primes are around the limit, and just about everything else below.... with kit glass way below. We are using manufacturing tolerences and polishing techniques where it is getting down to the point where they are talking about layers of atoms being removed....it is almost insane how precise they can be made.....but it comes down to what cost...

To make a lens down to the level of a single layer of atoms would involve price tags of $100,000's.... more than the market will bear... They make them to resolution of tens of atoms and charge in the $1000's. Even at that "sloppy" level, expansion of the glass due to fluctuating temperatures and pressure of mounting it is measureable. There really is a reason why lens calibration is to be done at room temperature.. Even if you managed to make that perfect lens at a reasonable price, get to around f* or so and your limit will be the defraction of light... and as densities increase, that f number drops...

The higher pixel densities of cell phone cameras and p/s cameras has largely become meaningless. The resolution of the sensors far exceeds the glass (or plastic) and improvements in image sharpness actually decrease at a pixel level. Very few people in the mass market understand that a 5 megapixel sensor would out-resolve the lens of thier camera and the merrily buy into the more pixel hysteria... It has more... it must be better...
The best camera is the one in your hands

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Re: Canon Confirms 70D; Future of Semi-Pro DSLR is FF
« Reply #89 on: February 05, 2013, 08:04:12 AM »