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Author Topic: Physical Ailments From Heavy Gear  (Read 12448 times)

alexanderferdinand

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Re: Physical Ailments From Heavy Gear
« Reply #15 on: February 12, 2013, 02:33:03 AM »
The old dilemma.

Carrying the gear comfortable like in a backpack (the thinktank Streetwalker HD I like a lot) causes a longer time to get to the camera and eventually miss a shot.

Carrying it on a shoulder strap you can draw much faster, but can cause pain.

My compromise is a holster with a broad strap to walk around or a chest harness to carry it in the front.
If the weather is fine, I have the lid half open to be faster.

At sport events I use the breaks to lay down the camera for a short time, this helped me a lot.


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Re: Physical Ailments From Heavy Gear
« Reply #15 on: February 12, 2013, 02:33:03 AM »

brad goda

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Re: Physical Ailments From Heavy Gear
« Reply #16 on: February 12, 2013, 05:17:40 AM »
Yoga
swimming

smartwool socks!

and I totally agree with the regular backpack strategy,,, thats what i use when biking through shots on a course or large event.

AudioGlenn

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Re: Physical Ailments From Heavy Gear
« Reply #17 on: February 12, 2013, 02:12:22 PM »
I felt some pain after carrying my DSLR around Disneyland for the first time.  It got me to start working out again.  Is that an option for you?  even some daily push ups could help...not sure of your age or general health but a normal exercise routine has done wonders for my back and shoulders.
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Zlatko

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Re: Physical Ailments From Heavy Gear
« Reply #18 on: February 12, 2013, 02:38:54 PM »
Canon has a bunch of small prime lenses which are fabulously lightweight.  Pick any ONE of these and you will save a lot of weight.

24/2.8 IS
28/2.8 IS
28/1.8
35/2.0 IS
40/2.8 STM pancake
50/1.4 USM
50/2.5 Macro
50/1.8

But pick just one, not two or three.  In particular, the 40mm pancake lens is a delight to carry.

agierke

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Re: Physical Ailments From Heavy Gear
« Reply #19 on: February 12, 2013, 02:49:49 PM »
if i shoot 2 all day weddings on a weekend, i need a full day to recover physically. my back and my ankles are just wrecked after a stint like that.

a few things that i have done to alleviate the soreness:

1. Black Rapid straps - puts the weight of the camera comfortably around my shoulders and allows the weight to shift so that its not pressing down on one point for long
2. Bought several pairs of Clarks shoes...those things are just damn comfortable and have spared me a ton of pain in my feet and ankles.
3. more thoughtful packing of my bag - i don't bring everything i might need anymore. i bring specific gear for whatever shoot i'm doing so i can keep weight down.
5D3, 5D2, 5DC, s15mm Fish, 24mm TSE, 35mm F1.4L, 50mm F1.2L, 85mm F1.8, 100mm F2.8L, 24-70mm F2.8L, 70-200mm F2.8L, 580EX, 580EX2, 600EXRT

7enderbender

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Re: Physical Ailments From Heavy Gear
« Reply #20 on: February 12, 2013, 03:37:17 PM »
The old dilemma.

Carrying the gear comfortable like in a backpack (the thinktank Streetwalker HD I like a lot) causes a longer time to get to the camera and eventually miss a shot.

Carrying it on a shoulder strap you can draw much faster, but can cause pain.

My compromise is a holster with a broad strap to walk around or a chest harness to carry it in the front.
If the weather is fine, I have the lid half open to be faster.

At sport events I use the breaks to lay down the camera for a short time, this helped me a lot.


And for that problem I'm still searching for the perfect bag that is comfortable and will hold only a gripped body with a 50L, a 135L and a flash. Nothing too bulky that is build for more stuff where you end up taking just those additional items that put you over the edge after a few hours.
5DII - 50L - 135L - 200 2.8L - 24-105 - 580EXII - 430EXII - FD 500/8 - AE1-p - bag full of FD lenses

applecider

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Re: Physical Ailments From Heavy Gear
« Reply #21 on: February 12, 2013, 03:47:36 PM »
I'm literally in the same shoes as you...  Have hammertoes and have to wear  orthotics and meter my on foot time and change shoes frequently.  Also have shoulder issues.

So for the feet the orthotics and time in the gym every day stretching the achilles and toes, long soaks in warm water if not acutely hurting cold if bad.  I also do a series of shoulder exercises geared to improve both rotator cuff and  strengthen lifting ability.  Google rotator cuff exercises and you'll get the gist.  I work in weight work on the triceps and deltoid groups to improve my big lens strength. 

Someone needs to put together a nice yoga, weight or flexibility package or  book geared to photographers.  Tai Chi for photographers. 

Plus 2 on the black rapid strap though, if the op hasn't tried one he should.
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Re: Physical Ailments From Heavy Gear
« Reply #21 on: February 12, 2013, 03:47:36 PM »

East Wind Photography

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Re: Physical Ailments From Heavy Gear
« Reply #22 on: February 12, 2013, 04:35:19 PM »
I got a StreetWalker Pro to carry around my 5DIII and 300 2.8L lens.  One of the benefits of this backpack is that you can get an accessory that allows you to connect your camera strap to the backpack shoulder straps thus taking the weight off your neck.  They sell a special strap with rings on it for that purpose but I found that I can just clip the accessory straps onto the Canon strap (thin part) and it supports the camera just fine.

I carry that combo around all day without any pain at all.  the StreetWalker Pro is also a minimalist backpack.  Pretty thin and is nice when you have to walk in tight quarters or at a wedding or sporting event.

To get stuff out of your backpack you have to "detach" the camera but it's worth the effort to save the neck and back. 

I have even carried my 5DIII with attached 300 2.8 in the backpack and strapped my 7D with 600 F4L to the backpack harness and felt reasonably comfortable walking in the woods.  Your legs get a bit tired from carrying that weight but from an ailment perspective I haven't had anything to complain about and it gets you in shape really fast!

KyleSTL

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Re: Physical Ailments From Heavy Gear
« Reply #23 on: February 12, 2013, 04:56:18 PM »
This post is in stark contrast to another one here:

I love big gear
http://www.canonrumors.com/forum/index.php?topic=12507.0

I agree with the sentiment here.  I used to carry an XTi with battery grip because it was taller and more comfortable to carry.  When I upgraded to a 30D, and eventually to my current 5D, I never once considered the BG because they were more comfortable to carry even without it.  I don't think I'd ever buy a '1D' type body.  I appreciate a smaller rig with good image quality over one with excellent image quality that is heavier.  I appreciate the fact that both Canon and Nikon are making smaller, lighter FF DSLRs made partially with plastic (gasp!).  I wish Canon would make more FF zoom lenses that are smaller and lighter than the current selection (like my 28-105mm II).  Here's a quick comparison of common standard zoom lenses:

Lens                                                          Dimensions        Filter        Weight
EF 28-80mm f/3.5-5.6 USM72 x 78mm58mm330g
EF 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5 USM73 x 70mm67mm380g
EF 28-105mm f/3.5-4.5 II USM72 x 75mm58mm375g
EF 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM78 x 97mm72mm549g
EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM84 x 107mm77mm670g
EF 24-70mm f/4L IS USM83 x 93mm77mm600g
EF 28-70mm f/2.8L USM83 x 118mm77mm880g
EF 24-70mm f/2.8L USM83 x 125mm77mm950g
EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM89 x 113mm82mm805g

Compared to my 28-105mm, the 28-135mm looks and feels large (I owed both and preferred the former so I kept it), and the 24-105mm is slightly bigger and heavier than it.  All the lenses above have Ring USM, metal mounts and at least Canon's mid-grade build quality.  Clearly smaller and lighter lenses are a real possibility (without going the cheapie route - i.e. 28-80mm, 28-90mm, 35-80mm, etc), whether or not Canon can make money on it is another issue entirely.

Also I still contend that Canon should make a smaller, lighter FF UWA lens than the current 17-40mm, similar in size and weight to the 20-35mm of yesteryear:

Lens                                             Dimensions        Filter        Weight
EF 20-35mm f/3.5-5.6 USM84 x 69mm77mm340g
EF 17-40mm f/4L USM84 x 97mm77mm475g
EF 20-35mm f/2.8L79 x 89mm72mm570g
EF 17-35mm f/2.8L USM84 x 96 mm77mm545g
EF 16-35mmf/2.8L USM84 x 103mm77mm600g
EF 16-35mmf/2.8L II USM89 x 112mm82mm640g

If Canon would introduce a new '24-85mm f/3.5-4.5'-like lens and a '20-35mm f/3.5-4.5'-like lens I would be first in line to order them.
Canon EOS 5D | Tamron 19-35mm f/3.5-4.5 | 24-105mm f/4L IS USM | 28-105mm f/3.5-4.5 USM | 70-300mm f4-5.6 IS USM
15mm f/2.8 Fisheye | 28mm f/1.8 USM | 50mm f/1.4 USM | 85mm f/1.8 USM | 3x 420EX | ST-E2 | Canon S90 | SD600 w/ WP-DC4

Zen

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Re: Physical Ailments From Heavy Gear
« Reply #24 on: February 12, 2013, 07:19:56 PM »
Hi everyone,

I sympathize with the OP big time. At age 76 and with genetically flat feet, significant arthritus and sciatica, I've looked for solutions to several of the same problems the OP and the others mention. I shoot a 5D3, and even with the lightest lenses, I simply cannot handle the weight on an ordinary neck strap.

So rather than going through a dozen or more shoulder/neck strap combinations that won't work anyway, all at significant expense, I've rejected that type of strap completely. Instead, I use a hand strap [currently a Canon, but with a Camdapter on the way] that gives good support to my right hand, yet allows easy use of my fingers.

Then, instead of trying to hold the camera constantly, I use a Lowe Pro Roller Attache X 50 bag. It's on wheels and easily handles my 5D3 with lens attached, a second lens, a flash, spare batteries and cards, and several other small accessories. If needed, I can stuff another mid sized lens in on top, but I seldom need one. The outer shell of the case is pretty stiff, making it easy to strap my tripod to the top whenever I want to take it along. What makes the case so convenient is that it opens at the top with a double slider zipper, hinges at the bottom, and with the zip undone all the way, the bag stays open without trouble. I generally leave the cam in the open case as I move around, then just grab it out of the top when I need it. If the terrain is rough, or there are others around and don't want the cam exposed to their view, I can close the zips a bit and close the compartment a little or all teh way. Thus, all the weight is in the bag except for the few minutes I actually hold the camera while shooting. Moreover, this thing is a convertible. That is, the part that actually contains the camera gear, can be lifted out of the roller base and converted to a shoulder bag, if needed. I've never needed it that way, though. When closed all the way, the bag easily fits in the carry on space on most [all?] planes.

This system works well for me and allows me more time with the camera. I'd suggest taking a look at this bag and a hand strap. Incidentally, one of the accessories I always carry is a bottle of Tylenol Arthritus Pain Relief 650mg strength.  ;D

Good luck to all. Whatever you do, I hope you can resolve the problems and avoid the aches and pains that  keep you away from doing what you want to do.

Zen

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Re: Physical Ailments From Heavy Gear
« Reply #25 on: February 13, 2013, 01:19:41 AM »
So rather than going through a dozen or more shoulder/neck strap combinations that won't work anyway, all at significant expense, I've rejected that type of strap completely. Instead, I use a hand strap [currently a Canon, but with a Camdapter on the way] that gives good support to my right hand, yet allows easy use of my fingers.
I've used a handstrap with my gripped bodies since forever, but I don't find them as comfortable with 'bare' bodies, what with the leeway because of the battery compartment. That Camdapter looks pretty good - and with quick release plate compatibility too! Could you keep us up to date on how that suits you?
5DIII, 17-40, 24-105, 70-200/4IS, 50/1.8II, 85/1.8 and a truckload of gimmicks and bits.

Zen

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Re: Physical Ailments From Heavy Gear
« Reply #26 on: February 13, 2013, 05:55:25 PM »
"That Camdapter looks pretty good - and with quick release plate compatibility too! Could you keep us up to date on how that suits you?"

Will be happy to report back. Give me a week to test it out.

Zen

samkatz

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Re: Physical Ailments From Heavy Gear
« Reply #27 on: February 13, 2013, 06:33:55 PM »
I have many back issues, not caused by my photography, but aggravated by prolonged shooting sessions.  since I'm not a pro, i can try to limit my time, but it's hard since I love shooting . I'm actually "trading down" in equipment, not for $$$ reasons, but for weight.  It's just a fact of life.  I use a carbon fiber monopod often to help me hold up the camera lens.  I use a Cotton Carrier Vest if I'm using a telephoto. not perfect. I rarely carry two kits at a time like I used to.

The problem isn't just weight. Having any weight hanging from the neck is bad, and the position of holding a camera steady w/arms close to the body, and focusing for a long time is very bad for our muscles..

I wish the camera and accessory mfrs. would take into account the number of aging or aching photographers, pro or amateur who have limitations. Like more DO type lenses, decent mid range SLR's that don't weigh a ton, etc.    As far as carry the stuff around, there are so many products, but none seem to hit the mark yet.


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Re: Physical Ailments From Heavy Gear
« Reply #27 on: February 13, 2013, 06:33:55 PM »

ScottyP

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Re: Physical Ailments From Heavy Gear
« Reply #28 on: February 13, 2013, 07:16:20 PM »
The problem with the heaviest lenses is no joke. 

I spent $12,000 on a 600mm f/4 lens and was getting some truly epic shots right out of the box.  But the sucker weighed 8.64 pounds, and it really took a toll on my health! 

Very soon I noticed a severe pain in my gut.  I disregarded it for several days, although it was accompanied by an audible "growling" in my abdomen.  After about 5 days, I noticed my skin was reddening and actually blistering as well.  It was very tender, and excruciatingly painful during daylight hours in particular. 

Finally I had to go to the doctor and I was startled by the diagnosis:  Malnutrition from having no money to eat, plus exposure/sunstroke from living under that very nice bridge near my old home! 

Reluctantly I sold my lovely, heavy lens (at a loss).  My symptoms went away almost immediately after I used the money to buy some groceries and pay the rent.

So watch out for the very heaviest lenses.  I could have died.
« Last Edit: February 13, 2013, 08:39:01 PM by ScottyP »
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androiduk

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Re: Physical Ailments From Heavy Gear
« Reply #29 on: February 13, 2013, 07:47:52 PM »
OP here. Thanks for all the input folks. It seems like there are plenty of people out there who are adversely affected by heavy gear and the industry would be well advised to address is at least somewhat considering the  over 40 crowd is making up a significant part of the population. There have been a number of suggestions about different straps but the one I'm using now is perfectly suited for street photography and it would take lots of pain for me to change it. As I mentioned before, it's a very long strap and the camera rests on my butt cheek. The strap (reflex E by kata-bags) is very slippery and provides the two things a street photographer needs most, stealth and speed. If you're walking towards me you can't even see the camera and a quick grab with my left hand brings it from my hip to shooting position in a second. Since I'm very happy with that setup and my new camera purchase (6D/24-105) is very close in weight to my old gear (T2i/tamron 18-270) I decided to concentrate on changing the way I shoot. When I'm out shooting I'm just so damn happy and content that I forget to sit/eat/drink,etc. That has to stop! Regular sit downs, snacks and drinks and a general pacing of myself will have to prevail. I probably should have done that before and I wouldn't have as many problems now. A good lesson if you're still young so you can keep shooting comfortably into old age. Thanks for all the replies.
« Last Edit: February 13, 2013, 07:50:27 PM by androiduk »

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Re: Physical Ailments From Heavy Gear
« Reply #29 on: February 13, 2013, 07:47:52 PM »