July 29, 2014, 06:24:54 PM

Author Topic: Show your Bird Portraits  (Read 632287 times)

CTJohn

  • EOS M2
  • ****
  • Posts: 198
    • View Profile
Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #1035 on: April 07, 2013, 10:22:49 PM »
Wow, John, you nailed that one.  What's the megadata for that photo?
Thanks.  7D, 70-300f/4-5.6 L lens, 1/640th sec, f/5.6, ISO 100
EOS 6D * EOS 7D * Powershot S110 * EF 24/105 f/4L * EF 70-300 f/4-5.6L * EF 100 f/2.8L Macro

canon rumors FORUM

Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #1035 on: April 07, 2013, 10:22:49 PM »

Rienzphotoz

  • Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS II
  • *******
  • Posts: 3321
  • Peace unto all ye Canon, Nikon & Sony shooters
    • View Profile
Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #1036 on: April 08, 2013, 09:04:51 AM »
Osprey from the Everglades
Perfect
Canon 5DMK3 70D | Nikon D610 | Sony a7 a6000 | RX100M3 | 16-35/2.8LII | 70-200/2.8LISII | 100/2.8LIS | 100-400LIS | 40/2.8 | 50/1.4 | 85/1.8 | 600EX-RTx2 | ST-E3-RT | 24/3.5 T-S | 10-18/4 OSS 16-50 | 24-70/4OSS | 55/1.8 | 55-210 OSS | 70-200/4 OSS | 28-300VR | HVL-F43M | GoPro Black 3+ & DJI Phantom

Don Haines

  • Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS II
  • *******
  • Posts: 2818
  • Posting cat pictures on the internet since 1986
    • View Profile
Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #1037 on: April 08, 2013, 09:46:40 AM »
I had asked a while ago for advice on photographing Chickadees. I got lots of useful advice on setting up blinds, use of long lenses, remote triggers, etc. It turns out that what I needed was a pocket full of sunflower seeds.

Taken with a 60D, 100L macro lens, ISO320....while using the camera one handed :) This is the full picture, no cropping.
The best camera is the one in your hands

TWI by Dustin Abbott

  • 1D X
  • *******
  • Posts: 1533
    • View Profile
    • dustinabbott.net
Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #1038 on: April 08, 2013, 10:10:21 AM »
6D x 2 | EOS-M w/22mm f/2 + 18-55 STM + EF Adapter| Rokinon 14mm f/2.8 | Tamron 24-70 f/2.8 VC | 35mm f/2 IS | 40mm f/2.8 | 100L | 135L | 70-300L -----OLD SCHOOL----- SMC Takumar 28mm f/3.5, Super Takumar 35mm f/3.5, SMC Takumar 55mm f/1.8, Helios 44-2 and 44-4, Super Takumar 150mm f/4

Slashp

  • Power Shot G16
  • **
  • Posts: 30
    • View Profile
Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #1039 on: April 08, 2013, 10:25:15 AM »
Close up on a duck

5D Mark III, 24-105L, 135L, 85 1.8, Sigma 70-300 f4-5.6

atosk930

  • Power Shot G16
  • **
  • Posts: 47
    • View Profile
Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #1040 on: April 08, 2013, 10:33:40 AM »
I had asked a while ago for advice on photographing Chickadees. I got lots of useful advice on setting up blinds, use of long lenses, remote triggers, etc. It turns out that what I needed was a pocket full of sunflower seeds.

Taken with a 60D, 100L macro lens, ISO320....while using the camera one handed :) This is the full picture, no cropping.

this is awesome, nothing like having them eat out of the palm of your hand
Rebel xTi and 18-55, 28-135 IS, 50 1.8 II, 75-300...70-200 2.8 IS II

rpt

  • Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS II
  • *******
  • Posts: 2123
  • Could not wait for 7D2 so I got the 5D3
    • View Profile
Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #1041 on: April 08, 2013, 10:42:47 AM »
I had asked a while ago for advice on photographing Chickadees. I got lots of useful advice on setting up blinds, use of long lenses, remote triggers, etc. It turns out that what I needed was a pocket full of sunflower seeds.

Taken with a 60D, 100L macro lens, ISO320....while using the camera one handed :) This is the full picture, no cropping.

this is awesome, nothing like having them eat out of the palm of your hand
So Don is a bird whisperer too! Wow! We have at least two on this forum. Gary Samples was the first I thought.  :)
I hope I am not missing any one...

canon rumors FORUM

Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #1041 on: April 08, 2013, 10:42:47 AM »

bjd

  • EOS M2
  • ****
  • Posts: 229
    • View Profile
Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #1042 on: April 08, 2013, 11:26:12 AM »
I had asked a while ago for advice on photographing Chickadees. I got lots of useful advice on setting up blinds, use of long lenses, remote triggers, etc. It turns out that what I needed was a pocket full of sunflower seeds.

Taken with a 60D, 100L macro lens, ISO320....while using the camera one handed :) This is the full picture, no cropping.
Hi, I've managed it with Blue Tits, Great Tits, Thrushes and I'm now working on a Robin.
For most birds Mealyworms are the way to go, obviously they must be insect eaters.

I get the birds to associate me with food and can call some with a whistle (through my lips).
Some even sit on the patio and call me if there is no other food out.

The best time is coming up when they are in feeding stress with their young, then they are easier
to "Persuade". Keep fairly quiet, provide a safe place for them to feed (where you sit) and try to give
them a reproducable situation at the start, makes them less nervous.

A good way to start is a white saucer with a few worms on it under/near  the normal feeding spot,
they'll notice the movement pretty quickly. Then you move the saucer gradually in your direction.
Going onto my hand was a big step for most birds, but they would fairly quickly sit in the bush next
to me and take worms out of my hands, while still sat on a branch.

And in the end you keep hold of the worm, meaning it gets torn apart between your fingers, but keeping
the bird closer for a longer period.

Here's fluffy, been a around a while now.

Cheers
« Last Edit: April 08, 2013, 11:28:42 AM by bjd »

Don Haines

  • Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS II
  • *******
  • Posts: 2818
  • Posting cat pictures on the internet since 1986
    • View Profile
Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #1043 on: April 08, 2013, 12:56:53 PM »
I had asked a while ago for advice on photographing Chickadees. I got lots of useful advice on setting up blinds, use of long lenses, remote triggers, etc. It turns out that what I needed was a pocket full of sunflower seeds.

Taken with a 60D, 100L macro lens, ISO320....while using the camera one handed :) This is the full picture, no cropping.

this is awesome, nothing like having them eat out of the palm of your hand
It works on Grey Jays too.... And no, I am NOT going to try this with the eagles at work.......
The best camera is the one in your hands

MaxPower

  • Power Shot G16
  • **
  • Posts: 29
    • View Profile
Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #1044 on: April 08, 2013, 01:38:52 PM »
Eagle  8)
6D - 15-85mm - 60mm Macro USM - 40mm f/2.8 STM - Sigma 35 1.4 - Canon 100mm Macro - 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM - 70-200mm f/2.8 L IS II USM - 100-400mm L IS USM - some Speedlites...
www.flickr.com/photos/damuellen/

dolina

  • 1D Mark IV
  • ******
  • Posts: 969
    • View Profile
Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #1045 on: April 08, 2013, 01:41:49 PM »
Wow Don! That's one surprising photo! Wish the birds here were as friendly!


Luzon Hornbill (Penelopides manillae) by alabang, on Flickr

The Luzon Hornbill (Penelopides manillae), sometimes called Luzon Tarictic Hornbill, is a species of hornbill in the Bucerotidae family. It is endemic to forests on Luzon and nearby islands in the northern Philippines. As is the case with all Philippine tarictic hornbills, it has been considered a subspecies of P. panini.[2]

There are two subspecies of the Luzon Hornbill: The relatively widespread nominate, and subniger from the islands of Polillo and Patnanongan.[2] It was hunted for meat, but now is considered to be safe as a new hunting ban has been enforced.

Source: Luzon Hornbill - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Taken: Ternate, Cavite - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Settings: Exif | Luzon Hornbill (Penelopides manillae) | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
Visit my Flickr, Facebook & 500px and see my photos. :)

DominoDude

  • PowerShot G1 X II
  • ***
  • Posts: 64
    • View Profile
Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #1046 on: April 08, 2013, 01:50:57 PM »
Here are 2 of my bird portraits (slightly cropped and downsized). The Rook is shot with the 400/5.6L and the Black-headed Gull's shot with the 70-200/4L IS. Both were taken on my Canon 7D.
My wishlist is longer than my gearlist...

Atonegro

  • PowerShot G1 X II
  • ***
  • Posts: 74
  • It's not the gear, it's the eye.
    • View Profile
Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #1047 on: April 08, 2013, 03:09:16 PM »
It's a baby-owl.
DCS 3c, D2000, 1DS, 1DS2, 1DS3, D800e and now waiting for the 1DS-X.....or a Nikon D4X...

English is not my native language, I learned  it only a few years ago. If you don't like my spelling, I will be happy to write it in Dutch for you.

canon rumors FORUM

Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #1047 on: April 08, 2013, 03:09:16 PM »

Rienzphotoz

  • Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS II
  • *******
  • Posts: 3321
  • Peace unto all ye Canon, Nikon & Sony shooters
    • View Profile
Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #1048 on: April 08, 2013, 04:00:10 PM »
I had asked a while ago for advice on photographing Chickadees. I got lots of useful advice on setting up blinds, use of long lenses, remote triggers, etc. It turns out that what I needed was a pocket full of sunflower seeds.

Taken with a 60D, 100L macro lens, ISO320....while using the camera one handed :) This is the full picture, no cropping.
Hi, I've managed it with Blue Tits, Great Tits, Thrushes and I'm now working on a Robin.
For most birds Mealyworms are the way to go, obviously they must be insect eaters.

I get the birds to associate me with food and can call some with a whistle (through my lips).
Some even sit on the patio and call me if there is no other food out.

The best time is coming up when they are in feeding stress with their young, then they are easier
to "Persuade". Keep fairly quiet, provide a safe place for them to feed (where you sit) and try to give
them a reproducable situation at the start, makes them less nervous.

A good way to start is a white saucer with a few worms on it under/near  the normal feeding spot,
they'll notice the movement pretty quickly. Then you move the saucer gradually in your direction.
Going onto my hand was a big step for most birds, but they would fairly quickly sit in the bush next
to me and take worms out of my hands, while still sat on a branch.

And in the end you keep hold of the worm, meaning it gets torn apart between your fingers, but keeping
the bird closer for a longer period.

Here's fluffy, been a around a while now.

Cheers
Don & bjd ... AWESOME!
Canon 5DMK3 70D | Nikon D610 | Sony a7 a6000 | RX100M3 | 16-35/2.8LII | 70-200/2.8LISII | 100/2.8LIS | 100-400LIS | 40/2.8 | 50/1.4 | 85/1.8 | 600EX-RTx2 | ST-E3-RT | 24/3.5 T-S | 10-18/4 OSS 16-50 | 24-70/4OSS | 55/1.8 | 55-210 OSS | 70-200/4 OSS | 28-300VR | HVL-F43M | GoPro Black 3+ & DJI Phantom

rpt

  • Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS II
  • *******
  • Posts: 2123
  • Could not wait for 7D2 so I got the 5D3
    • View Profile
Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #1049 on: April 08, 2013, 09:06:57 PM »
I had asked a while ago for advice on photographing Chickadees. I got lots of useful advice on setting up blinds, use of long lenses, remote triggers, etc. It turns out that what I needed was a pocket full of sunflower seeds.

Taken with a 60D, 100L macro lens, ISO320....while using the camera one handed :) This is the full picture, no cropping.
Hi, I've managed it with Blue Tits, Great Tits, Thrushes and I'm now working on a Robin.
For most birds Mealyworms are the way to go, obviously they must be insect eaters.

I get the birds to associate me with food and can call some with a whistle (through my lips).
Some even sit on the patio and call me if there is no other food out.

The best time is coming up when they are in feeding stress with their young, then they are easier
to "Persuade". Keep fairly quiet, provide a safe place for them to feed (where you sit) and try to give
them a reproducable situation at the start, makes them less nervous.

A good way to start is a white saucer with a few worms on it under/near  the normal feeding spot,
they'll notice the movement pretty quickly. Then you move the saucer gradually in your direction.
Going onto my hand was a big step for most birds, but they would fairly quickly sit in the bush next
to me and take worms out of my hands, while still sat on a branch.

And in the end you keep hold of the worm, meaning it gets torn apart between your fingers, but keeping
the bird closer for a longer period.

Here's fluffy, been a around a while now.

Cheers
Wow! Thanks for sharing. This is fantastic!

canon rumors FORUM

Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #1049 on: April 08, 2013, 09:06:57 PM »