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Author Topic: Show your Bird Portraits  (Read 971122 times)

jrista

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #2250 on: August 15, 2013, 09:47:39 AM »
Thanks for the complements and suggestions, guys.  Jrista, I was reading a recent thread about back button focus and have started to look into that.  I'm not exactly sure yet how to achieve the desired effects.  There have been so many shooting opportunities lately that I'm hard pressed to find time to read up on technicalities.  Winter will change all that up here.  And thanks for the pointers on AI servo, I'll make a point of trying to personally evaluate all three modes to see how they behave relative to my situations.

Yes I only use the center point with what I've been doing lately.  Once I noticed other points going momentarily red when a bird moved (I did not have them enabled), would that have been due to AI Servo operation?

The other points lighting would probably just be because you are using all AF points. You should manually select just the center point to guarantee focus occurs where you want it to. AI Servo simply continuously reevaluates focus at the given point...it won't switch to using other points. In the 7D, 5D III, and 1D X you have flexible point selection modes...you can select an expansion, which will include the points surrounding the selected one, or zone, which will include even more points, which is useful for tracking subjects (which is only really possible with AI Servo, no other mode will track effectively.) A single selected point, usually center, is best for learning, however.

For me personally I appreciate the shortcomings being pointed out since otherwise I'll go on blindly doing the same old thing.  In DPP one can brighten or darken the raw file and as I've fiddled with that I've wondered just how I would judge if it's over-exposed - just comes with experience or are there any guidelines??

Experience definitely helps. The goal is to reproduce reality, but also avoid subjects becoming too bright such that they start to look washed out or otherwise unnatural. The wood perch in the last waxwing photo is what gives away the overexposure. Colors are also richest when they span the high shadows, midtones, and low highlights. Push them too deep into shadow or highlight, and you start losing color fidelity.

My friend printed one of the nicer hummingbird shots of mine with his Canon printer 13x19 tonight and I was pretty pleased.  You can look from 5 inches and not see a flaw or grain - thrilled actually.  However, it seems when a picture is physically there in front of you that it somehow presents differently.  For example, the background that I thought was fine on the computer monitor doesn't seem quite so wonderful - any thoughts?

Print tends to have a lesser gamut than computer screens. Color extent is usually similar, or even higher, with Canon and Epson printers these days. Maximum bright white and deepest dark black tend to be much less than on a computer screen, however. Detail in the blacks, and crispness of the highlights, will usually be lost in print unless you are using a high dMax (black point) paper with a bright white point. Papers with the broadest range from black point to white point are usually more on the glossy side, and usually have OBAs, or optical brightening agents. Such papers usually result in very vibrant prints, however prints with OBAs have shorter lifetimes than natural fiber papers that have low acid and no OBA.

Print is a whole 'nother hobby in and of itself. There are a huge variety of papers, various types of canvas, a wide range of printers with different types of ink (Epson has UltraChrome, UltraChrome K3, UltraChrome HDR, UltraChrome HDR+White; Canon has Lucia, Lucia EX, ChromaLife). The quality of output from a printer depends on how well the selected paper is calibrated with that ink set (each printer only supports one ink set, btw). Noise in photos is usually not a real problem in print. Print pixel density is usually at least 3x higher than it is on a normal computer screen, assuming a 300ppi (360ppi for Epson) print resolution. Even if noise is visible on screen, it is usually invisible in print, and often helps smooth gradients and blurry backgrounds, eliminates posterization that might occur during color space conversion, etc. I always try to keep a little bit of noise around in my photos when I print them, and if I denoise, I'll add just a small amount back into the backgrounds to ensure my prints come out best.

There is a lot to know about print. If you really want to get into it, there is some good material out there. Otherwise, you can let a professional take care of it for you.

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #2250 on: August 15, 2013, 09:47:39 AM »

neuroanatomist

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #2251 on: August 15, 2013, 10:29:13 AM »
Marsh wren and cormorant (pretty ratty looking wings on this fellow!).  Both with EOS 1D X, EF 600mm f/4L IS II + EF 1.4x III Extender. 
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schill

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #2252 on: August 15, 2013, 10:39:28 AM »
In another thread, there has been some discussion of the benefits of higher fps.  Here's an example of a moment that I might have missed with slower than the 8fps of my 7D.  Of course, I might have caught it with a single shot, too.  I figure my chances were better with the 8fps. :)

7D, 70-200/2.8, cropped a bit.

Harris Hawk (or mouse in flight), Cincinnati Zoo Bird Show

rpt

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #2253 on: August 15, 2013, 12:28:21 PM »
In another thread, there has been some discussion of the benefits of higher fps.  Here's an example of a moment that I might have missed with slower than the 8fps of my 7D.  Of course, I might have caught it with a single shot, too.  I figure my chances were better with the 8fps. :)

7D, 70-200/2.8, cropped a bit.

Harris Hawk (or mouse in flight), Cincinnati Zoo Bird Show

Deadly! No pun intended! Fantastic picture. That is a scrawny mouse! The hawk must be very hungry.

Jack Douglas

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #2254 on: August 15, 2013, 12:51:57 PM »
Thanks Jrista for taking the time to give that very informative reply.  It all makes sense, but initially a guy is swimming in a sea of information. 

I almost only ever use center spot focus, other than for small birds flying quickly in the sky.

Thankfully by hook or crook a fair number of impressive shots come out of the process and it's virtually impossible to get discouraged.  For those I miss, there is always something that to me is awesome.  Of course my critical sense is rising and I'm more aware of the shortcomings but peoploe around me are still blown away by what I have to show.  For birds and me it's mainly extreme patience and luck but I won't broadcast that too much.  ;)

Here's one from back in May.

6D  300F2.8 II  1000th F2.8 ISO 2000
6D  24-70 F4  70-200 F2.8 II  300 F2.8 II  1.4X III  2X III

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #2255 on: August 15, 2013, 12:54:30 PM »
In another thread, there has been some discussion of the benefits of higher fps.  Here's an example of a moment that I might have missed with slower than the 8fps of my 7D.  Of course, I might have caught it with a single shot, too.  I figure my chances were better with the 8fps. :)

7D, 70-200/2.8, cropped a bit.

Harris Hawk (or mouse in flight), Cincinnati Zoo Bird Show


Good timing. Well done Sir!

schill

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #2256 on: August 15, 2013, 01:07:43 PM »
In another thread, there has been some discussion of the benefits of higher fps.  Here's an example of a moment that I might have missed with slower than the 8fps of my 7D.  Of course, I might have caught it with a single shot, too.  I figure my chances were better with the 8fps. :)

7D, 70-200/2.8, cropped a bit.

Harris Hawk (or mouse in flight), Cincinnati Zoo Bird Show


Good timing. Well done Sir!

Here's another from a couple weeks later.  Same hawk, same gear.  This is a crop of the right side of a landscape view (almost the entire height).

Both of these cases are misses, where she didn't catch the mouse in midair.  Normally she does.


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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #2256 on: August 15, 2013, 01:07:43 PM »

GuyF

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #2257 on: August 15, 2013, 01:09:09 PM »
5D3 300mm f2.8 with Kenko 1.4x TC

AlanF

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #2258 on: August 16, 2013, 03:17:18 PM »
5DIII + 300mm f/2.8 II + 2xTC III @f/5.6 1/320 iso 1250, hand held. It's difficult to get detailed images of kingfisher's plumage, but the 2xTC III performed well.
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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #2259 on: August 16, 2013, 03:18:54 PM »
5DIII + 300mm f/2.8 II + 2xTC III @f/5.6 1/320 iso 1250, hand held. It's difficult to get detailed images of kingfisher's plumage, but the 2xTC III performed well.

That's a beautiful shot Alan. Well done.

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #2260 on: August 16, 2013, 04:00:57 PM »
5DIII + 300mm f/2.8 II + 2xTC III @f/5.6 1/320 iso 1250, hand held. It's difficult to get detailed images of kingfisher's plumage, but the 2xTC III performed well.

Nice shot!
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serendipidy

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #2261 on: August 17, 2013, 06:00:43 AM »
5DIII + 300mm f/2.8 II + 2xTC III @f/5.6 1/320 iso 1250, hand held. It's difficult to get detailed images of kingfisher's plumage, but the 2xTC III performed well.

That's a beautiful shot Alan. Well done.
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Northstar

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #2262 on: August 17, 2013, 12:29:26 PM »
300mm 2.8 with 2xiii

Egret decided last second he didn't want his picture taken. ::)

I'm not sure but I think these are wood ducks?
« Last Edit: August 17, 2013, 12:42:38 PM by Northstar »
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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #2262 on: August 17, 2013, 12:29:26 PM »

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #2263 on: August 17, 2013, 12:36:33 PM »
300mm 2.8 with 2xiii

not sure but I think these are wood ducks?

Yes they are.  :)

GuyF

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #2264 on: August 17, 2013, 02:32:22 PM »
5D3 300mm f2.8 with Kenko 1.4x TC

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #2264 on: August 17, 2013, 02:32:22 PM »