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Author Topic: Show your Bird Portraits  (Read 1165306 times)

jrista

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5445 on: May 07, 2014, 04:03:47 PM »
You also seem to have some rather docile birds. I can never get as close as you do. :P
I´m not sure you would say that if you joined me on a trip. It often takes me a couple of hours of very careful movements and lots of sit-still-and-be-patient time to get them close enough. Some duck species are easy though

The other day I spotted an Eurasian Teal, which is rather rare this far north. It was too far away, but I thought he would come my way, so I sat patiently in a spot, very quiet and still. After a long time I heard a low whisper next to me and I had a giant male swan studying med from 4-5 feet away, with his head and wings held in their aggressive posture and I was sitting on my but, with the tripod and 600mm over my lap. You don´t mess with them! First instinct was to run, second was to sit still, which i did. After a while he lost interest and glided away. Puuhhh! An hour later I could conclude that I would not get an image of the Eurasian Teal ...

You and I seem to have similar tactics and experiences. :) I spend hours getting close. I've sat, covered in camo, on the muddy shores of various wetlands and ponds and lakes, for hours for birds to get comfortable and close. I think that's just the bird photographer's life...patience. To get the shots of the Ibis, I spent over an hour getting close and waiting for them to do interesting things. I spent about 40 minutes getting some shots of this beautiful Black-crowned Night Heron. It's just how it is...it takes time, and most of the time, you end up with nothing for your efforts.

My equipment is a pop-up hunting blind, a folding camp chair, a thermos of tea, and assorted camera gear. After a while they forget about the hunting blind....

I actually have the Ameristep Chair Blind: http://www.naturescapes.net/store/ameristep-tent-chair-ground-blind.html

It is wonderful when you have the right kind of background trees and foliage to hid it in. When I just set it up out in the open, it's conspicuous enough that the birds still stay away. Also, when it comes to getting the kind of low perspective I like, it just can't get low enough to the ground. I am usually laying flat, with my tripod either entirely flat, or at the next set of notches to flat. When I'm around wetlands, where the ground is always muddy, laying is the best approach...the chair feet just sink and get stuck, the chair ends up uneven, and I'm constantly having to get out and level it or fix it in some way...which kind of negates it's purpose. :P

The blind has proven more useful for wildlife...deer and prairie dogs. I am also hoping I can find a way to set it up near one of the Kingfisher hangouts so they will stop chattering at me and get down to the business of fishin'. :D

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5445 on: May 07, 2014, 04:03:47 PM »

scyrene

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5446 on: May 07, 2014, 04:44:41 PM »
You also seem to have some rather docile birds. I can never get as close as you do. :P
I´m not sure you would say that if you joined me on a trip. It often takes me a couple of hours of very careful movements and lots of sit-still-and-be-patient time to get them close enough. Some duck species are easy though

The other day I spotted an Eurasian Teal, which is rather rare this far north. It was too far away, but I thought he would come my way, so I sat patiently in a spot, very quiet and still. After a long time I heard a low whisper next to me and I had a giant male swan studying med from 4-5 feet away, with his head and wings held in their aggressive posture and I was sitting on my but, with the tripod and 600mm over my lap. You don´t mess with them! First instinct was to run, second was to sit still, which i did. After a while he lost interest and glided away. Puuhhh! An hour later I could conclude that I would not get an image of the Eurasian Teal ...

You and I seem to have similar tactics and experiences. :) I spend hours getting close. I've sat, covered in camo, on the muddy shores of various wetlands and ponds and lakes, for hours for birds to get comfortable and close. I think that's just the bird photographer's life...patience. To get the shots of the Ibis, I spent over an hour getting close and waiting for them to do interesting things. I spent about 40 minutes getting some shots of this beautiful Black-crowned Night Heron. It's just how it is...it takes time, and most of the time, you end up with nothing for your efforts.

My equipment is a pop-up hunting blind, a folding camp chair, a thermos of tea, and assorted camera gear. After a while they forget about the hunting blind....

I actually have the Ameristep Chair Blind: http://www.naturescapes.net/store/ameristep-tent-chair-ground-blind.html

It is wonderful when you have the right kind of background trees and foliage to hid it in. When I just set it up out in the open, it's conspicuous enough that the birds still stay away. Also, when it comes to getting the kind of low perspective I like, it just can't get low enough to the ground. I am usually laying flat, with my tripod either entirely flat, or at the next set of notches to flat. When I'm around wetlands, where the ground is always muddy, laying is the best approach...the chair feet just sink and get stuck, the chair ends up uneven, and I'm constantly having to get out and level it or fix it in some way...which kind of negates it's purpose. :P

The blind has proven more useful for wildlife...deer and prairie dogs. I am also hoping I can find a way to set it up near one of the Kingfisher hangouts so they will stop chattering at me and get down to the business of fishin'. :D

I got a chair hide, which is great but I can't easily carry it along with my big camera bag, so it's sat back at home for months (plus, I tend to be more mobile when chasing birds, rather than sitting in one place). It helps that a lot of the best places for birds in the UK have permanent bird hides (although they tend not to produce the best shots in my experience).
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scyrene

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5447 on: May 07, 2014, 04:45:48 PM »
I got a few nice bird portraits yesterday. Here's a tree sparrow (Passer montanus) sitting on the edge of a roof.

(5D3 + 500L II + 2x III; 1000mm, f/10, 1/500, ISO 1600).
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jrda2

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5448 on: May 07, 2014, 04:51:51 PM »
baby Great Horned Owl.... spring time is great

jrda2

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5449 on: May 07, 2014, 04:58:08 PM »
one more of the spring babies in the area....

Click

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5450 on: May 07, 2014, 05:04:02 PM »
Beautiful shots jrda2

kevinle4230

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5451 on: May 07, 2014, 06:08:07 PM »
Is this good enough for portrait?

Canon 1DX + 600mm lens.

K1DX1996-3 by kevinle4230, on Flickr

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5451 on: May 07, 2014, 06:08:07 PM »

Click

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5452 on: May 07, 2014, 06:38:25 PM »
Very nice shot ... And Welcome to CR  :)

serendipidy

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5453 on: May 07, 2014, 08:31:21 PM »
Glossy/White-faced Ibis Hybrid

Common to Colorado are the White-faced Ibis. They are beautiful birds, long slender necks, burgundy feathers with green wings and a patchwork of faintly colored feathers on their backs. These birds are fairly elusive here in Colorado, and they have been a target of mine for a couple years now. I've seen flocks flying overhead, usually at sunset, and only been able to get remote silhouette shots.

A couple days ago, at the Cottonwood Creek wetland, a good-sized flock of Ibis were hanging out, bathing and preening in the calmer backwaters of the wetland ponds. After some time carefully getting into position, I finally managed to get some nice shots of these beautiful waders. Once they were finally framed in my lens, I realized that at least one, if not a few, looked like Glossy Ibis. A VERY similar bird, the Glossy Ibis is endemic to the Everglades of Florida, and very rarely ventures anywhere else. The key difference is the very thin white border around the Glossies face, where as the White-faced has a much larger border that blends into their burgundy and green head and neck feathers. However the face on the Ibis in front of me was a thin and mottled white line...somewhat different from a Glossy.

The White-faced and Glossy Ibis have only a very small region of the Gulf Coast where they cohabitate a couple times a year. In my research to identify the bird I've captured here, the only photos that looked identical were labeled "White-faced/Glossy Ibis Hybrid". I'm honestly unsure how common a hybrid cross between White-faced and Glossy Ibis is, however given the small overlap in their ranges, I suspect it can't be that much more common in Colorado than the Glossy itself.

Hybridized Ibis
White-faced and Glossy

Cottonwood Creek Wetland
Cherry Creek, Colorado

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That is a beautiful bird and wonderful captured. Thank you for your very informative posts!

+100

Fantastic photos, jrista! :)
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serendipidy

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5454 on: May 07, 2014, 08:33:38 PM »
Is this good enough for portrait?

Canon 1DX + 600mm lens.

K1DX1996-3 by kevinle4230, on Flickr

Yup :)
Very nice.
EOS 5D miii, EOS 7D, 70-200mm f/2.8L IS ii, 100-400mmL IS

Click

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5455 on: May 07, 2014, 08:35:38 PM »
Glossy/White-faced Ibis Hybrid


Lovely shots Sir  8)

serendipidy

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5456 on: May 07, 2014, 08:37:51 PM »
It's been a while since I posted anything so here are a recent few. EXIf and more shots on my Flickr site. 7D, 100-400L, handheld, pp in DPP.

Young Juvenile BCN Heron by EricJ777, on Flickr

Young Juvenile BCN Heron by EricJ777, on Flickr

Young Juvenile BCN Heron by EricJ777, on Flickr
EOS 5D miii, EOS 7D, 70-200mm f/2.8L IS ii, 100-400mmL IS

Click

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5457 on: May 07, 2014, 08:39:42 PM »
Cool shots Serendipidy. I especially like the first one  :)

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5457 on: May 07, 2014, 08:39:42 PM »

serendipidy

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5458 on: May 07, 2014, 08:43:36 PM »
EOS 5D miii, EOS 7D, 70-200mm f/2.8L IS ii, 100-400mmL IS

serendipidy

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5459 on: May 07, 2014, 08:44:56 PM »
Cool shots Serendipidy. I especially like the first one  :)

Thanks, Click.
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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5459 on: May 07, 2014, 08:44:56 PM »