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Tilt Shift Lenses - Looking for Advice

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Hector1970:
Hi All,
I'm really tempted to save all my money and buy a Canon TS-E 24mm II tilt shift lens.
Alot of people like the 17mm version and there is a 45mm and 90mm version.
I had a few questions.
a) Is 24mm more useful than 17mm or would the use of an extender actually make 17mm more useful
b) What would you use a 45mm TS-E for - is it designed with a particular type of photograph in mind
c) What would you use a 90mm TS-E for - A few of the minature videos or photographs I've seen have been done with this focal length but I assume thats not the real purpose of that focal length

What would I be using if for - I love sharpness I would like to achieve back to front sharpness for landscapes.
I might do a bit of architectural photography.
I do like the tilt (minature) effect (although its got quite common and the examples are getting worse).
If you use an extender with a 17mm is it then a bit restrictive as the maximum aperture is reduced?

I'd be interested in any advice.
The 24mm TSE would be my favourite at the moment.
I have a 50mm Flektogon Pentagon 6 on a Arax tilt mechanism.
It only tilts - it's like a hard to control Lensbaby.
I'd love a real tilt/shift lens.
I'd be interested too in those who have a tilt shift lens.
They are so expensive - do you actually use it alot afterwards.
It's a bit like a holy grail object.
I was like that with the 70-200 IS II - it even exceeded my expectation and I'm delighted I saved up for it.
Will I have the same sort of moment with a tilt shift lens.

Menace:
Would it be possible for you to rent it for the week end and really give it a good go? See how you like it.

shutterwideshut:

--- Quote from: Menace on February 21, 2013, 04:10:22 AM ---Would it be possible for you to rent it for the week end and really give it a good go? See how you like it.

--- End quote ---

I Agree. Tilt shift lenses are not for everyone. These lenses are manual focus, non zoom lenses which require care and attention to use. These lenses require slower workflow than the usual auto focus zoom/prime lenses. It's much better for you to rent and see for yourself if you and ts-e lens can get along in the real world.  :)

But if I were to suggest one focal length, I would suggest you take the Canon TS-E24mm f/3.5L II.

Hector1970:
I've no option to rent. I envy those who can. I'm used to manual lenses I have a few already.

rs:
The relatively new 17 and 24 II both have independent rotation of tilt/shift axis, which makes them much more useful that the previous generation TS-E lenses. While landscape and architecture can be taken with a wide range of focal lengths, usually you're looking at the wider end for those applications. The 24 TS-E is optically the best of the bunch, while the 21 year old 90 TS-E is also optically excellent, although it is typically used for product photography. The 17 TS-E isn't all that sharp wide open, and doesn't respond too well to TC's. Even stopped down to f11 with the 1.4x TC, its nowhere near as sharp as the 24 TS-E II is wide open:

http://www.the-digital-picture.com/Reviews/ISO-12233-Sample-Crops.aspx?Lens=487&Camera=453&Sample=0&FLI=1&API=4&LensComp=486&CameraComp=453&SampleComp=0&FLIComp=0&APIComp=0

Obviously ultimate sharpness is less important than having the correct focal length for your application, but the 24 TS-E is possibly the pick of the bunch for your requirements.

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