Gear Talk > PowerShot

P&S - Faster lens or bigger sensor?

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DanielW:

--- Quote from: neuroanatomist on February 27, 2013, 06:06:57 PM ---Personally, I'd get the S100 over the S110 - the improvements were marginal, IMO (unlike the S100 vs. the S95).

If I were to replace my S100 today, it would be with a Sony RX100 - same form factor with an even bigger sensor.

--- End quote ---
As I understand IQ is the same, the S100 will most likely be my choice between these two.
The Sony is sure a great camera, but a definite overkill in my wife's hands, who's a frame-and-then-press-the-little-round-button kind of photographer.
Many thanks :)

JerryKnight:

--- Quote from: elflord on February 27, 2013, 06:46:18 PM ---The bigger sensor will perform better in favourable lighting (e.g. when you don't have to crank up the ISO). In less than ideal lighting, it's a wash (though again the difference in maximum aperture may be smaller at the wide end in which case the camera with the larger sensor may still do better)

--- End quote ---

I'm not a P&S expert at all, but I think you got that backwards. A larger sensor, all else being equal, will perform better in low light than a smaller sensor. In bright light, every sensor tends to do well (again, not considering every other camera component). Even the microscopic sensor in my phone can produce decent images in full daylight.

DanielW:

--- Quote from: elflord on February 27, 2013, 06:46:18 PM ---The bigger sensor will perform better in favourable lighting (e.g. when you don't have to crank up the ISO). In less than ideal lighting, it's a wash (though again the difference in maximum aperture may be smaller at the wide end in which case the camera with the larger sensor may still do better)

--- End quote ---
If the bigger sensor wins in good lighting and it's a wash in low-light, well, that makes the decision a quite easy one.
Thanks!

JerryKnight:

--- Quote from: DanielW on February 27, 2013, 07:18:18 PM ---If the bigger sensor wins in good lighting and it's a wash in low-light, well, that makes the decision a quite easy one.
Thanks!

--- End quote ---

Yeah, you might want to check that claim first. I won't repeat my earlier post, but I claim that larger sensors make the biggest difference in low light.

pwp:
I went for the bright lens option in the form of the G15. This camera will be perfect for plenty of photographers. But it didn't really work for me and was moved along after just a couple of months. I should have gone for a bigger sensor. The G15 was neither here nor there. Not as compact and pocketable as an S100/S110 and failing to deliver on the IQ my fussy standards require. Compared to what I was used to (5D3 & 1D4), the limited dynamic range and shutter lag were the deal breakers. This won't apply to everyone. The G15 is a very cool little camera.

This is a roundabout way of saying that sensor size and lens brightness are not the only things to consider when choosing a compact. Being pocket or purse size means it will get more use. Demonstrably fast AF and minimal lag need to be considered if catching that magic moment is important to you.

RX100 anyone? Leica M9 for the cashed up?

-PW

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