December 20, 2014, 11:22:46 PM

Author Topic: Birds of the Philippines  (Read 6024 times)

reactionart

  • Power Shot G7X
  • **
  • Posts: 7
    • View Profile
Re: Birds of the Philippines
« Reply #15 on: March 25, 2013, 10:21:37 PM »
Fantastic shots man. I lived in the Philippines from birth to 14 years and seeing bits of nature from my birth country is something else.
Canon 70D | Tokina 11-16mm | Canon 17-55mm IS | Canon 50mm 1.4 | Canon 85mm 1.8 | Sigma 50-150mm HSM OS | Canon 430ex II and 580ex II | 3 Yongnuo YN-622C Triggers.

canon rumors FORUM

Re: Birds of the Philippines
« Reply #15 on: March 25, 2013, 10:21:37 PM »

dolina

  • 1D X
  • *******
  • Posts: 1106
    • View Profile
Re: Birds of the Philippines
« Reply #16 on: March 26, 2013, 09:23:30 PM »
Thanks reactionart.


Eurasian Tree Sparrow (Passer montanus) by alabang, on Flickr

The Old World sparrow genus Passer is a group of small passerine birds that is believed to have originated in Africa, and which contains 15–25 species depending on the authority.[10] Its members are typically found in open, lightly wooded, habitats, although several species, notably the House Sparrow (P. domesticus) have adapted to human habitations. Most species in the genus are typically 10–20 cm (4–8 in) long, predominantly brown or greyish birds with short square tails and stubby conical beaks. They are primarily ground-feeding seed-eaters, although they also consume invertebrates, especially when breeding.[11] Genetic studies show that the Eurasian Tree Sparrow diverged from the other Eurasian members of its genus relatively early, before the speciation of the House, Pegu and Spanish Sparrows.[12][13] The Eurasian species is not closely related to the American Tree Sparrow (Spizella arborea), which is an American sparrow.[14]

The Eurasian Tree Sparrow's binomial name is derived from two Latin words: passer, "sparrow", and montanus, "of the mountains" (from mons "mountain").[3] The Eurasian Tree Sparrow was first described by Carl Linnaeus in his 1758 Systema Naturae as Fringilla montana,[15] but, along with the House Sparrow, it was soon moved from the finches (family Fringillidae) into the new genus Passer created by French zoologist Mathurin Jacques Brisson in 1760.[16] The Eurasian Tree Sparrow's common name is given because of its preference of tree holes for nesting. This name, and the scientific name montanus, do not appropriately describe this species's habitat preferences: the German name Feldsperling ("field sparrow") comes closer to doing so.[17]

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurasian_Tree_Sparrow

Taken at http://www.villaescudero.com/birdwatching.php

Settings: 1/200 ƒ/4.5 ISO1,000 600mm
Visit my Flickr, Facebook & 500px and see my photos. :)

dolina

  • 1D X
  • *******
  • Posts: 1106
    • View Profile
Re: Birds of the Philippines
« Reply #17 on: March 31, 2013, 08:50:57 PM »

Black-crowned Night Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) by alabang, on Flickr

The scientific name, Nycticorax, means "night raven", and refers to this species' nocturnal habits and harsh crow-like call.

In the Falkland Islands, the bird is called "quark", which is an onomatopoeia similar to its name in many other languages, like "kwak" in Dutch and Frisian, "kvakoš noční" in Czech, "квак" in Ukrainian, "кваква" in Russian, "Vạc" in Vietnamese, "Kowak-malam" in Indonesian, and "Waqwa" in Quechua.

Source: Black-crowned Night Heron - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Taken at Villa Encarnation II, Valenzuela City, Philippines

Settings: 1/1600 ƒ/6.3 ISO400 420mm
Visit my Flickr, Facebook & 500px and see my photos. :)

dolina

  • 1D X
  • *******
  • Posts: 1106
    • View Profile
Re: Birds of the Philippines
« Reply #18 on: April 07, 2013, 03:29:32 PM »

Philippine Bulbul (Hypsipetes philippinus) by alabang, on Flickr

The Philippine Bulbul (Hypsipetes philippinus) is a songbird species in the bulbul family (Pycnonotidae). It is often placed in the genus Ixos, but is better retained in Hypsipetes as long as this is not entirely merged into Ixos, as it is quite closely related to the type species of Hypsipetes, the Black Bulbul (H. leucocephalus).[1]

It is endemic to the Philippines. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests; on Mount Kitanglad on Mindanao for example it is abundant in any kind of primary forest at least between 500 and 2,250 m ASL.[2]

Fledglings of the Philippine Bulbul were recorded on Mindanao in late April, but the breeding season seems to be prolonged as females with ripe ovarian follicles were still found in April and May. Territorial songs are heard at lower altitudes as late as May, while further upslope the birds are silent at that time of year and presumably engaged in breeding activity. The Besra (Accipiter virgatus) has been recorded as a predator of young Philippine Bulbuls, and this or other goshawks might also catch adult birds.[3]

A common and adaptable bird as long as sufficient forest remains, it is not considered a threatened species by the IUCN.[4]

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philippine_Bulbul

Taken: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ternate,_Cavite

Settings: 1/80 ƒ/5.6 ISO160 800mm
Visit my Flickr, Facebook & 500px and see my photos. :)

canon rumors FORUM

Re: Birds of the Philippines
« Reply #18 on: April 07, 2013, 03:29:32 PM »