September 19, 2014, 01:53:27 PM

Author Topic: Birds of the Philippines  (Read 5500 times)

dolina

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Birds of the Philippines
« on: March 04, 2013, 02:17:01 PM »

Philippine Duck (Anas luzonica) by alabang, on Flickr

Anas luzonica is endemic to the Philippines, being recorded from all the major islands and eight smaller islands. Records since 1980 derive from c.30 localities, most on Luzon and Mindanao. Records from Siquijor and the Sulus remain unsubstantiated. A steep population decline was evident by the mid-1970s, with high numbers recorded at only a few sites in the following decade, e.g. Candaba Marsh (Luzon) which probably supported many thousands in the early 1980s. Subsequent local extinctions and near-disappearances have occurred in several significant sites, including Candaba Marsh and Buguey wetlands (where several thousand were recorded in 1983). Important current areas include Polillo Island (240 seen and an estimated 3,000 present in 1996), Subic Bay (600 seen in 1997), Magat dam (2,000 were seen in 2001) and Malasi lakes (1,320 were recorded in 2002), Luzon. Other recent records come from Mangatarem, Pangasinan (east of Zambales Mountains IBA) where 70 individuals were counted on the Barabac River inside the Manleluag Spring National Park, Cantilan mangroves in Surigao del Sur and from a mangrove fishpond in Bicol Region, Southern Luzon (B. Tabaranza in litt. 2007). In 1993, its population was estimated at 10,000-100,000, but by 2002 fewer than 10,000 birds were thought to remain.

Source: http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/speciesfactsheet.php?id=439

Settings: 1/160 ƒ/8 ISO320 800mm

These uncaptive birds were recorded in Candaba Wetlands, Pampanga, Philippines
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Birds of the Philippines
« on: March 04, 2013, 02:17:01 PM »

dolina

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Re: Birds of the Philippines
« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2013, 01:31:59 PM »

Great Egret (Ardea alba) by alabang, on Flickr

With its long, white breeding plumes, orange-yellow bill, and green facial skin, the Great Egret at the height of the breeding season is stunning to behold. Even at other times of the year, when it loses its plumes and its face and bill return to their typical dull yellow, this large, white wader is difficult to overlook. Male and female Great Egrets are similar (38 inches) at all times of the year. The Great Egret is widely distributed across warmer parts of the globe. In North America, the Great Egret breeds primarily in the southeastern United States, with smaller pockets of breeding territory in the Great Plains, the northeast, and in the west. Most of the Great Egrets in the southeast are permanent residents, but those in cooler climates migrate south for the winter, where they may be found along the coast of California, in the southwest, and in Texas. This species also breeds in Eurasia from southern Europe east to east Asia, wintering in North Africa, India, and Southeast Asia. Populations also exist in South America, Australia and New Zealand. Great Egrets live in and around small bodies of water. In summer, Great Egrets nest in colonies, called ‘rookeries,’ in trees surrounding lakes and ponds. This species utilizes similar habitats during the winter. Great Egrets mainly eat fish, but may also take crustaceans and small vertebrates (such as frogs, lizards, and mice) when the opportunity arises. Great Egrets may be best observed wading in shallow water, where they may be seen plunging their bills into the water to catch fish. It is also possible to see Great Egrets at their rookeries, especially when they return to roost at sunset, or while flying with their feet extended and their necks pulled in. Great Egrets are primarily active during the day.

Source: http://eol.org/pages/1178488/overview

Taken at the International Rice Research Institute, Los Baños, Philippines

Settings: 1/2000 ƒ/6.3 ISO640 800mm
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dolina

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Re: Birds of the Philippines
« Reply #2 on: March 10, 2013, 05:34:17 PM »

Little Egret (Egretta garzetta) by alabang, on Flickr

The little egret is an opportunistic hunter (5), feeding mainly during the day whilst walking through shallow, open water, stabbing prey with its bill (5) (6). It is highly dependent on visual cues when hunting and therefore its feeding is highly affected if the water is not clear (5) (6). It feeds primarily on small fish, which are usually around 1.2 to 6 centimetres in length, but bivalves, crustaceans, and other invertebrates are also consumed (5).

Little egrets breed at different times of the year depending on location. Those populations based in Europe and Asia breed during spring and summer, whilst the breeding seasons of more tropical populations coincide with rainy seasons (5). Little egrets nest in mixed or single species colonies, and lay four to six eggs in single clutch, with the chicks hatching three weeks later and fledging at four weeks old. The chicks will spend a further month in their parents' care before leaving the nest and dispersing (7).

Source: Little egret videos, photos and facts - Egretta garzetta - ARKive

Taken at the International Rice Research Institute, Los Baños, Philippines

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rcarca

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Re: Birds of the Philippines
« Reply #3 on: March 11, 2013, 07:37:36 PM »
Nice series.
5DMkiii, 7D, loads of glass

dolina

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Re: Birds of the Philippines
« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2013, 01:29:19 AM »
Thank you rcarca.


Purple-throated Sunbird (Leptocoma sperata) by alabang, on Flickr

has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). The population trend appears to be stable, and hence the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.

Source: http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/speciesfactsheet.php?id=8273

Taken at UP Los Banos, Philippines

Settings: 1/30 ƒ/5.6 ISO1600 800mm
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dolina

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Re: Birds of the Philippines
« Reply #5 on: March 14, 2013, 08:07:53 PM »

Chestnut Munia, (Lonchura atricapilla) by alabang, on Flickr

he Chestnut Munia, (Lonchura atricapilla) (formerly considered as a  subspecies of the Tricoloured Munia Lonchura malacca atricapilla) also  known as Black-headed Munia, is a small passerine bird. This estrildid  finch is a resident breeding bird in Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia,  China, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Burma, Nepal, Philippines,  Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, Vietnam and Hawaii. Known as mayang pula  ("red maya", to distinguish it from the predominantly brownish Tree  Sparrow which is also called maya) in the Philippines, perhaps because  of its brick red patch on the lower back that shows only when it flies.  The Black-headed Munia is the former national bird of the Philippines  (the Philippine national bird is now the Philippine eagle).

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chestnut_Munia

Taken at Candaba, Philippines

Settings: 1/640 ƒ/5.6 ISO640 800mm


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dolina

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Re: Birds of the Philippines
« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2013, 08:15:48 PM »

Brown Shrike (Lanius cristatus) by alabang, on Flickr

This shrike is mainly brown on the upper parts and the tail is rounded. The black mask can be paler in winter and has a white brow over it. The underside is creamy with rufous flanks and belly. The wings are brown and lack any white "mirror" patches. Females tend to have fine scalloping on the underside and the mask is dark brown and not as well marked as in the male. The distinction is not easy to use in the field but has been tested with breeding birds in Japan where the female can be identified from the presence of a brood patch. The use of multiple measurements allows discrimination of the sex of about 90% of the birds Subspecies lucionensis has a grey crown shading into the brown upperparts and the rump appears more rufous than the rest of the upperback. The tail is more brownish and not as reddish as in the Red-backed Shrike. Younger birds of lucionensis have brown crown and lacks the grey on the head. Supspecies superciliosus has a broad white supercilium and richer reddish crown. The tail is redder and tipped in white.

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown_Shrike

Taken at UP Los Banos

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Re: Birds of the Philippines
« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2013, 08:15:48 PM »

AprilForever

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Re: Birds of the Philippines
« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2013, 09:25:20 PM »
Thanks for sharing, and keep it coming!!!
What is truth?

dolina

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Re: Birds of the Philippines
« Reply #8 on: March 15, 2013, 08:18:49 AM »
Thank you April.


Long-tailed Shrike (Lanius schach) by alabang, on Flickr

This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). The population trend is not known, but the population is not believed to be decreasing sufficiently rapidly to approach the thresholds under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.

Source: http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/106007758/0

Taken in Muntinlupa City

Settings: 1/160 ƒ/5.6 ISO400 800mm
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dolina

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Re: Birds of the Philippines
« Reply #9 on: March 17, 2013, 06:21:23 PM »

Black-crowned Night Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) by alabang, on Flickr

Despite being fairly ubiquitous on a global level, the slightly unusual nocturnal habit of the black-crowned night heron renders it less conspicuous than most other herons (2) (3) (4). Of moderate size for a heron, this stockily built species has short legs and a short neck, with the male, on average, being the slightly larger of the sexes (2) (5). As its name suggests, the adult black-crowned night heron has a glossy, black cap that extends down the upper back, while the rest of the body plumage generally ranges from white to ashy grey (2) (5). The nape is adorned with two to three long, white plumes reaching up to 25 cm in the breeding season (5). The stout bill is black in colour, the eyes, a piercing crimson, and the legs, yellow-green for most of the year but becoming pink during the breeding season (2) (5). Juveniles are mostly brown, with heavy striping and pale spots, but as they grow towards the adult plumage, become more solidly dark above and pale below (2). Four subspecies that differ subtly in appearance and occupy different ranges are currently recognised: Nycticorax nycticorax nycticorax, N. n. hoactli, N. n. obscurus and N. n. falkandicus (2) (5).(5)[/URL][/SUP].

Source: http://www.arkive.org/black-crowned-night-heron/nycticorax-nycticorax/

Taken in Valenzuela City, Philippines

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dolina

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Re: Birds of the Philippines
« Reply #10 on: March 18, 2013, 07:56:20 PM »

Blue-tailed Bee-eater (Merops philippinu) by alabang, on Flickr

This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence 30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.

Source: http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/speciesfactsheet.php?id=1179

Taken at Candaba, Pampanga, Philippines

Settings: 1/800 ƒ/8 ISO800 800mm
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dolina

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Re: Birds of the Philippines
« Reply #11 on: March 19, 2013, 11:12:00 PM »

Yellow-vented Bulbul (Pycnonotus goiavier) by alabang, on Flickr

The Yellow-vented Bulbul (Pycnonotus goiavier) is a member of the bulbul family of passerine birds. It is resident breeder in southeast Asia from southern Thailand and Cambodia south to Borneo and the Philippines.

It is found in a wide variety of open habitats, but not deep forest. It is one of the most common birds in cultivated areas. They appear to be nomadic, roaming from place to place regularly.

The Yellow-vented Bulbul builds a well-camouflaged but fragile, loose, deep, cup-shaped nest from grass, leaves, roots, vine stems, and twigs. The nest is untidy on the outside, but it is neatly lined with plant fibers. It may be built in a wide range of places from low bushes to high trees. This is a species adapted to humans and may even nest in gardens. The Yellow-vented Bulbul lays 2-5 eggs in February to June.

The Yellow-vented Bulbuls eats berries and small fruits. They also sip nectar, nibble on young shoots, and take some insects.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellow-vented_Bulbul

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dolina

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Re: Birds of the Philippines
« Reply #12 on: March 20, 2013, 07:22:35 PM »

Spotted Munia (Lonchura punctulata) by alabang, on Flickr

The Scaly-breasted Munia or Spotted Munia (Lonchura punctulata), known in the pet trade as Nutmeg Mannikin or Spice Finch, is a sparrow-sized estrildid finch native to tropical Asia. A species of the genus Lonchura, it was formally described and named by Carl Linnaeus in 1758. Its name is based on the distinct scale-like feather markings on the breast and belly. The adult is brown above and has a dark conical bill. The species has 11 subspecies across their range and differ slightly in size and colour.

This Munia eats mainly on grass seeds apart from berries and small insects. They forage in flocks and communicate with soft calls and whistles. The species is highly social and may sometimes roost with other species of munias. This species is found in tropical plains and grasslands. Breeding pairs construct dome-shaped nests using grass or bamboo leaves.

The species is endemic to Asia and occurs from India and Sri Lanka east to Indonesia and the Philippines. It has been introduced into many other parts of the world and feral populations have established in Puerto Rico and Hispaniola as well as parts of Australia and the United States of America. The bird is listed as of Least Concern by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scaly-breasted_Munia

Taken in the Muntinlupa City, Philippines

Settings: 1/1000 ƒ/4 ISO250 600mm
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Re: Birds of the Philippines
« Reply #12 on: March 20, 2013, 07:22:35 PM »

dolina

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Re: Birds of the Philippines
« Reply #13 on: March 21, 2013, 09:15:38 PM »

Pied Fantail (Rhipidura javanica) by alabang, on Flickr

Pied Fantails are named for their habit of fanning out their beautiful long tails. It has been suggested that by revealing the white tips of the tail, insects are startled into movement.

Pied Fantails eat mainly insects. Unlike their relatives the flycatchers, Fantails forage close to the ground in the dark understorey, perching on a root or low branch, teetering at the ready to launch into flight. They catch their prey on the wing and rarely miss. Their broad bill is ringed with spines (rictal bristles) which may help them catch insects even in the dim light of the understorey.

They move actively in the undergrowth, lurching from perch to perch; dashing in acrobatic flights. They make short flights from one cover to the next. They are generally quite inquisitive and not shy. They hunt alone or in pairs.

Source: pied fantail (rhipidura javanica): info fact sheet, photos

Take at Muntinlupa City, Philippines

Settings: 1/2000 ƒ/4.5 ISO10,000 600mm
« Last Edit: March 21, 2013, 10:12:44 PM by dolina »
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dolina

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Re: Birds of the Philippines
« Reply #14 on: March 25, 2013, 08:24:39 PM »

Indigo-banded Kingfisher (Alcedo cyanopectus) by alabang, on Flickr

The Indigo-banded Kingfisher (Alcedo cyanopectus) is a species of bird in the Alcedinidae family. It is endemic to the Philippines, where it is a generally uncommon but locally common resident of the northern and central islands. There are two subspecies, the nominate race, which occurs on Luzon, Polillo, Mindoro, Sibuyan and Ticao, and A. c. nigriostris, which is found in Panay, Negros and Cebu. It forms a superspecies with the Silvery Kingfisher of the southern Philippines.[1]

The Indigo-banded Kingfisher feeds on fish and aquatic insects. It perches on rocks and overhanging branches and foliage and dives steeply into the water to catch its prey. Once caught, it returns the prey to the perch where it is beaten and swallowed. Little is known about its breeding behaviour, although it is known to nest in tunnels dug into the banks of streams and rivers.[1]

Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical mangrove forests.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indigo-banded_Kingfisher

Taken at http://www.villaescudero.com/birdwatching.php

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Re: Birds of the Philippines
« Reply #14 on: March 25, 2013, 08:24:39 PM »