Gear Talk > Lenses

Do you use lens correction profiles when processing raw files or not with LR4

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RayValdez360:
Lightroom 4.  I  have been using raws all the time now and I finally checked the lens correction button and I noticed my images getting brighter and stretched (undistorted?) I mainly shoot in clubs and some  portraits. I honestly didn't noticed  the pincushion effect but now that I know about it I am wondering if  my images might be better in the long run   if I correct  them. I use a 24-70. I get slight pincushion on the long end. SOmeone help me thanks....

brianboru:
As "privatebydesign" mentioned, it's a style choice.  Obviously any transformation like distortion removal has the potential to soften detail to some extent as new pixels are being interpreted to allow for the correction.  The great thing with LR is that it's non destructive to your original so that if you decide in the future you need a version where ultimate sharpness is more important than distortion correction, you can undo it or create a new virtual copy without it.

Of note are the sliders at the bottom of the "Lens Corrections" pane where you can adjust the "Amount" to which the profile corrections are applied, so you can even find your own middle ground if you want.

dstppy:
I always use it, especially since going FF.  Depends how distorted the lens ends up being though.  My 200mm on crop seems to never need it . . .

sdsr:
I always use it, though I sometimes partially (or completely) undo the vignette "correction" (I never undo the distortion corrections); of course, sometimes the corrections make almost no visible difference. 

distant.star:
.
I use it most of the time. Once you know exactly what is affected by the "correction" in each lens, you can make a decision picture by picture. Many people I know will make it part of an auto preference, probably smarter so you can undo it for a particular picture.

There are times when I've had to just go manual and use the lens corrections manually instead of the profile -- usually with really wide architectural stuff where lines are badly bowed.

Anyway, it's fun to play with either way.

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