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Author Topic: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?  (Read 28834 times)

distant.star

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #105 on: May 28, 2013, 03:24:13 PM »
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Cayenne --

I hope you will not take any action based on discussions here. It's fun to sling the bull about, but qualified legal counsel should be consulted if you have questions that can get you into legal trouble.

B&H recently offered a video on copyright that is the best general info I've seen (again, it's not intended as personal legal counsel for your situation). While it's sort of a long, hard slog, (and one guy is a touch obnoxious), it's worth watching if you really want to learn something about this area:

The Copyright Zone Guys Small | Large


Personally, this was a lot of my MJ training long ago so it interests me enough to watch. Another thing, you probably don't have to actually "watch" the video. I just listened while doing other things (like post process images).
Walter: Were you listening to The Dude's story? Donny: I was bowling. Walter: So you have no frame of reference here, Donny. You're like a child who wanders into the middle of a movie and wants to know...

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #105 on: May 28, 2013, 03:24:13 PM »

PureAmateur

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #106 on: May 28, 2013, 03:51:55 PM »
Google Glass Photographer Small | Large


Google glass would be the answer :P

m

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #107 on: May 28, 2013, 04:31:54 PM »
how are they going to prevent me from selling that image?

Being in a different country does not necessarily prevent you from getting sued.
I don't think they will, but that's not the point.

cayenne

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #108 on: May 28, 2013, 04:55:45 PM »
how are they going to prevent me from selling that image?

Being in a different country does not necessarily prevent you from getting sued.
I don't think they will, but that's not the point.

Thanks for the input, and I'll watch the video listed above later this evening...
But seriously...how can someone "copyright" a public building?!?!

I just can't see how that would stand up in court.....

C

tpatana

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #109 on: May 28, 2013, 05:01:39 PM »
I don't understand guests at weddings who get all fancy dresses, makeup, haircuts, expensive suites and then don't want to be photographed. A lot of times they see that I am taking pictures of them and then turn their back to me. I know that i am shooting with Canon, but c'mon it does not hurt ;)

I had that too. I guess some people really don't want they pictures taken.

serendipidy

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #110 on: May 28, 2013, 05:03:25 PM »
how are they going to prevent me from selling that image?

Being in a different country does not necessarily prevent you from getting sued.
I don't think they will, but that's not the point.

Thanks for the input, and I'll watch the video listed above later this evening...
But seriously...how can someone "copyright" a public building?!?!

I just can't see how that would stand up in court.....

C

My understanding:
The building is not copyrighted...it's the light display at night which, under French law, is considered a work of art and, if used commercially, requires license fee. Daytime photos of the Eiffel Tower...shoot away all you want.

edit- source:Wikipedia
Image copyright claims

The tower and its representations have long been in the public domain. However, a French court ruled, in June 1990, that a special lighting display on the tower in 1989, for the tower's 100th anniversary, was an "original visual creation" protected by copyright. The Court of Cassation, France's judicial court of last resort, upheld the ruling in March 1992.[53] The Société d'exploitation de la tour Eiffel (SETE) now considers any illumination of the tower to be under copyright.[54] As a result, it is no longer legal to publish contemporary photographs of the tower at night without permission in France and some other countries.

The imposition of copyright has been controversial. The Director of Documentation for what was then the Société nouvelle d'exploitation de la tour Eiffel (SNTE), Stéphane Dieu, commented in January 2005, "It is really just a way to manage commercial use of the image, so that it isn't used in ways we don't approve." However, it also potentially has the effect of prohibiting tourist photographs of the tower at night from being published,[55] as well as hindering non-profit and semi-commercial publication of images of the tower. Besides, French doctrine and jurisprudence traditionally allow pictures incorporating a copyrighted work as long as their presence is incidental or accessory to the main represented subject,[56] a reasoning akin to the de minimis rule. Thus, SETE could not claim copyright on photographs or panoramas of Paris incorporating the lit tower.
« Last Edit: May 28, 2013, 05:14:49 PM by serendipidy »
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serendipidy

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #111 on: May 28, 2013, 05:05:57 PM »
I don't understand guests at weddings who get all fancy dresses, makeup, haircuts, expensive suites and then don't want to be photographed. A lot of times they see that I am taking pictures of them and then turn their back to me. I know that i am shooting with Canon, but c'mon it does not hurt ;)

I had that too. I guess some people really don't want they pictures taken.

LOL...I'll bet these same people have facebook or other websites and publish photos of themselves all the time :)
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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #111 on: May 28, 2013, 05:05:57 PM »

tpatana

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #112 on: May 28, 2013, 05:06:40 PM »
Few months ago I was shooting a school building. I was told it'd be empty, but there was some after school basketball tournament no-one told me about. I checked in at the office, they knew I was supposed to be there, and they gave me a visitor badge to wear. And every 5 minutes one of the teacher came to me, asking why I'm taking pictures of the kids. I tried to explain I was hoping the building was empty, as I didn't want people on the pics. Most took the explanation, but one older lady was really pressing me if I was really supposed to be there, and that was I really taking pictures of the building and not the kids.

cayenne

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #113 on: May 28, 2013, 05:07:22 PM »
how are they going to prevent me from selling that image?

Being in a different country does not necessarily prevent you from getting sued.
I don't think they will, but that's not the point.

Hmm..ok, Well, I take a picture, and redo the color in PS and voila!! It is them my original work of art.
:)

Copyrighting light? Sheesh...seems a stretch there too, but again...daytime shots or PS edited nighttime ones should be ok, eh?


Thanks for the input, and I'll watch the video listed above later this evening...
But seriously...how can someone "copyright" a public building?!?!

I just can't see how that would stand up in court.....

C

My understanding:
The building is not copyrighted...it's the light display at night which, under French law, is considered a work of art and, if used commercially, requires license fee. Daytime photos of the Eiffel Tower...shoot away all you want.

jebrady03

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #114 on: May 28, 2013, 05:08:25 PM »
I plan to handle it via monologue...

"Wow... so @holes like you really do exist.  You know, I read a thread on Canon Rumors one time where people discussed what to do if some jerk comes up and begins demanding that you throw away your legally protected rights because they're uneducated and insecure for some reason.  It went on for several pages.  The recommendations varied from smiling and apologizing - for what, I'm not sure, since I have the legal right to do what I'm doing - to flashing you this gun I have here in my camera bag, to swirling 4 lbs of metal and glass around my head like Crocodile Dundee and lodging it inside your ignorant @$$ head.  What you do next is going to determine what happens.  You can either tuck your tail and walk away or you can live the rest of your life as a vegetable.  I'll calmly await your decision with my gun in one hand and my camera strap in the other..."

At least... that's how it goes in my head when I ponder what I'd do... lol

cayenne

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #115 on: May 28, 2013, 05:51:17 PM »
Few months ago I was shooting a school building. I was told it'd be empty, but there was some after school basketball tournament no-one told me about. I checked in at the office, they knew I was supposed to be there, and they gave me a visitor badge to wear. And every 5 minutes one of the teacher came to me, asking why I'm taking pictures of the kids. I tried to explain I was hoping the building was empty, as I didn't want people on the pics. Most took the explanation, but one older lady was really pressing me if I was really supposed to be there, and that was I really taking pictures of the building and not the kids.

Wow.
When did it become 'illegal' to take pictures of kids? What gives them special 'rights' the rest of us don't seem to have?

Drizzt321

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #116 on: May 28, 2013, 06:37:32 PM »
Few months ago I was shooting a school building. I was told it'd be empty, but there was some after school basketball tournament no-one told me about. I checked in at the office, they knew I was supposed to be there, and they gave me a visitor badge to wear. And every 5 minutes one of the teacher came to me, asking why I'm taking pictures of the kids. I tried to explain I was hoping the building was empty, as I didn't want people on the pics. Most took the explanation, but one older lady was really pressing me if I was really supposed to be there, and that was I really taking pictures of the building and not the kids.

Wow.
When did it become 'illegal' to take pictures of kids? What gives them special 'rights' the rest of us don't seem to have?

It's the fear that has been propagated by the media that everyone is out to kidnap and abuse your kids, or use them for some other nefarious reason. Especially men, they are teh debil, and obviously just looking for an excuse.

This is very unfortunate, as it could be a great challenge to shoot kids at a playground or something since they're moving all around so fast and always are doing something.
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tpatana

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #117 on: May 28, 2013, 06:55:04 PM »
Few months ago I was shooting a school building. I was told it'd be empty, but there was some after school basketball tournament no-one told me about. I checked in at the office, they knew I was supposed to be there, and they gave me a visitor badge to wear. And every 5 minutes one of the teacher came to me, asking why I'm taking pictures of the kids. I tried to explain I was hoping the building was empty, as I didn't want people on the pics. Most took the explanation, but one older lady was really pressing me if I was really supposed to be there, and that was I really taking pictures of the building and not the kids.

Wow.
When did it become 'illegal' to take pictures of kids? What gives them special 'rights' the rest of us don't seem to have?

It's the fear that has been propagated by the media that everyone is out to kidnap and abuse your kids, or use them for some other nefarious reason. Especially men, they are teh debil, and obviously just looking for an excuse.

This is very unfortunate, as it could be a great challenge to shoot kids at a playground or something since they're moving all around so fast and always are doing something.

I did think to myself if they would have made such in case of female photographer. Most likely not. Kinda sad, and the media is really the one to blame for creating such hysteria.

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #117 on: May 28, 2013, 06:55:04 PM »

distant.star

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #118 on: May 28, 2013, 07:19:04 PM »
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The paranoia runs especially deep (at least here in the U.S.) when it comes to children -- at least taking photographs of them (we don't seem to get quite as upset when they're shot!).

I found myself surrounded by four police officers (township and county) demanding to know why I was taking pictures of kids on school buses. I was standing on the street waiting for a bus, and to kill time I was taking pictures -- a few school buses went by and big yellow things make colorful pictures. I didn't give it a lot of thought or look for much from the pictures.

Apparently someone who should be seeing a therapist called the cops and told them someone was taking pictures of kids on school buses. Police, equally paranoid, sprang into action; not much else going on mid-afternoon, I suppose.

It can be tough when you carry a camera!
Walter: Were you listening to The Dude's story? Donny: I was bowling. Walter: So you have no frame of reference here, Donny. You're like a child who wanders into the middle of a movie and wants to know...

cayenne

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #119 on: May 28, 2013, 08:13:07 PM »
.
The paranoia runs especially deep (at least here in the U.S.) when it comes to children -- at least taking photographs of them (we don't seem to get quite as upset when they're shot!).

I found myself surrounded by four police officers (township and county) demanding to know why I was taking pictures of kids on school buses. I was standing on the street waiting for a bus, and to kill time I was taking pictures -- a few school buses went by and big yellow things make colorful pictures. I didn't give it a lot of thought or look for much from the pictures.

Apparently someone who should be seeing a therapist called the cops and told them someone was taking pictures of kids on school buses. Police, equally paranoid, sprang into action; not much else going on mid-afternoon, I suppose.

It can be tough when you carry a camera!

Wow..that's amazing.

Seems stupid to me too...I mean, if you WERE wanting to kidnap some kids or something, WTF would you want to be photographing them so brazenly in public beforehand??  Just doesn't make sense....

Then again...of late, it seems the world has really changed in so many significant ways in the past couple decades in ways that are truly sad, and one of them is in how we think of and treat other people.

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #119 on: May 28, 2013, 08:13:07 PM »