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Author Topic: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?  (Read 30020 times)

Chuck Alaimo

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #135 on: June 01, 2013, 12:37:18 PM »
I once had my car break down on a busy freeway and since I had to wait for the repair service to come pick it up, ......It Didn't take long for the police to show up to question me what I was doing there either, so I guess the police just looks for unusual behaviour.

I think the police stopping by when your car breaks down is a good thing.  :)

Having worked for a Highway Patrol department in one state I'll tell you it's more than a "good thing."

Interstate highways (freeways in general) exist to move vehicles. Anytime a vehicle or pedestrian or dog, ladder, mattress, etc. is stopped anywhere on the highway, it is unsafe. At the very least, it's a distraction to drivers. At worst, it's an obstacle. With the prevalence of cell phones the last 20 years, every such instance floods a dispatch center with calls so everything is known. Officers are dispatched. Depending on where/what it is, they don't give it a high priority, but they'll eventually investigate. It's also gender specific. If a woman is reported to be sitting in a car on the side of a road, that's a higher priority than a man -- from days of yore when chivalry ruled, I suppose. Nevertheless, it's a reality.

These days I'm guessing if you stop on the shoulder AND get out and start taking pictures, officers will get there faster!

Last summer the first day I took my bike out, I didn't notice I was already on reserve. So drive few miles, the engine stalls as I ran out of gas. I rolled to stop and parked the bike, called AAA to bring me enough gas to get to a gas station. The neighborhood was fancier than average, not B. Gates style but still better than many around here.

It was nice day, so I laid down on the lawn next to the road while waiting for AAA. I was highly tempted to have a beer as I was carrying couple in the saddle bags, but eventually didn't. Give 15 minutes, a police car pulls over. I get up and go say hi to the officer, and explained the situation, and he drives off.

I was thinking to myself that maybe someone had reported a biker stopping at their nice neighborhood. That was quite remote spot for police just randomly go around. Don't know.

Not really sure how this went from street photography to rights and wrongs of the police...but ---

my 2 cents...

To protect and serve...more times than not the police take the protect roll to the extreme and forget about the serve roll.  I have had a mix of experiences with police, but for the most part i have been thankful for their presence.  From running out of gas and having them pick me up and give me a ride to call AAA (yeah, that was before the age of cell phones).  I just think we're conditioned to see those flashing lights and assume cuffs are next, where that's not always the case.  To protect and serve...yeah, that sometimes means hop in and I'll get you to the gas station. 
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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #135 on: June 01, 2013, 12:37:18 PM »

cayenne

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #136 on: June 01, 2013, 03:20:23 PM »

Not really sure how this went from street photography to rights and wrongs of the police...but ---

my 2 cents...

To protect and serve...more times than not the police take the protect roll to the extreme and forget about the serve roll.  I have had a mix of experiences with police, but for the most part i have been thankful for their presence.  From running out of gas and having them pick me up and give me a ride to call AAA (yeah, that was before the age of cell phones).  I just think we're conditioned to see those flashing lights and assume cuffs are next, where that's not always the case.  To protect and serve...yeah, that sometimes means hop in and I'll get you to the gas station.

Hmm..these days, I thought the motto had changed to "To collect and serve..."

Ellen Schmidtee

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #137 on: June 03, 2013, 02:34:50 AM »
Lol do cops think all criminal activity starts with taking a photo?

Buildings - "yeah am gonna blow it up. Better take a picture first to remember this moment"

<snip>

But seriously how did taking a photo get connected to crime?

Paparazzi is one example, e.g. paparazzi chasing lady Diana to her death.

Another is scenes shown at, as example, the last episodes of Criminal Minds, where the bad guy is shown following the good guys, taking their photos, developing the photos (apparently he hasn't gone digital), etc. It's a common trick to show the bad guy was following someone here and there and everywhere without actually showing the bad guy.

Kristofgss

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #138 on: June 03, 2013, 03:31:06 AM »

Not really sure how this went from street photography to rights and wrongs of the police...but ---


My bad  ;D

To get it on track again, I did play around with a 100D this weekend and they are so cute with the 40mm pancake; A lot better suited to street photography than the 5 or 7 series with grip. It looks like a point-and-shoot, so I'm guessing you could get away with taking pictures at a lot more places with that one (and am very tempted to get it as well, but I do miss the fact that you can't enter the color temperature in Kelvin by hand as I do mostly jpg

Ricku

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #139 on: June 23, 2013, 01:29:13 PM »
I think this video is highly relevant to this thread: http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=226_1371944841

He makes street shooting look so easy! ;D

tpatana

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #140 on: June 23, 2013, 03:11:54 PM »
People like that are the reason many people don't like photographers on public.

There's nice/proper public photography, and there's annoying/not-proper photography. That video was clearly the latter.

I'd be ashamed to act like that.

Don Haines

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #141 on: June 23, 2013, 04:36:35 PM »


The ONLY problems I've ever had, shooting documentaries all over the world and the country were in Louisiana - did 3 projects there.  Buncha crazy paranoids, I tell ya!  Maybe NO is different than the rest of the state (our crew mostly had run ins with police around Baton Rouge and then further south closer to Houma.  I'm sure you're a nice guy but honestly I spent almost a year there shooting those pieces and I don't care if I ever go back - beautiful scenery and the ladies are pretty too, but I really really was left with a bad impression of the people.
My goodness!!

I am so sorry to hear this, I really am. That just is not indicative of what is usually described about us....

Well, if you're every in the NOLA area, please drop me a line and I'll buy ya a couple of drinks....and who knows, bring your camera we *might* find something interesting to shoot in this town.

:)

C

Or come to Ottawa, Canada.... I've been on Parliament Hill, the seat of our nations government, with tripod and camera set up, merrily snapping away, and have had at least a dozen people come up to me, hand me a camera, and ask if I'd take their picture... Once, a pair of mounties (RCMP, Canada's national police force and providers of security on Parliament Hill), walked over to me and we started chatting about canoes... with a constant interruption from tourists who wanted their picture taken WITH the mounties.... Welcome to Canada, Eh?
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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #141 on: June 23, 2013, 04:36:35 PM »

distant.star

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #142 on: June 23, 2013, 06:49:09 PM »
Quote from: Ricku
I think this video is highly relevant to this thread:
He makes street shooting look so easy! ;D

I can't imagine the purpose of that video, but it's neither believable nor credible to me. Each scene looks contrived and acted.
Walter: Were you listening to The Dude's story? Donny: I was bowling. Walter: So you have no frame of reference here, Donny. You're like a child who wanders into the middle of a movie and wants to know...

distant.star

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #143 on: June 23, 2013, 06:57:46 PM »
Or come to Ottawa, Canada.... I've been on Parliament Hill, the seat of our nations government, with tripod and camera set up, merrily snapping away, and have had at least a dozen people come up to me, hand me a camera, and ask if I'd take their picture... Once, a pair of mounties (RCMP, Canada's national police force and providers of security on Parliament Hill), walked over to me and we started chatting about canoes... with a constant interruption from tourists who wanted their picture taken WITH the mounties.... Welcome to Canada, Eh?

Ottawa is amazing. I left a business meeting one day and went out for a walk around downtown at lunchtime. Standing on a corner waiting to cross the street I asked the man standing next to me what one of the government buildings was. He instantly took me on an extended tour of the government buildings and monuments -- with a generous side of Canadian history. He was some kind of government functionary and devoted his entire lunch period to my education.

Kindness like that is never wasted and is rarely forgotten!
« Last Edit: June 25, 2013, 11:44:46 AM by distant.star »
Walter: Were you listening to The Dude's story? Donny: I was bowling. Walter: So you have no frame of reference here, Donny. You're like a child who wanders into the middle of a movie and wants to know...

Kristofgss

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #144 on: June 25, 2013, 10:12:06 AM »
Well, I tried the 100D and pancake in some public places and even at ikea to take some shots of interior ideas and nobody commented on it. People seem to consider it as not much different from taking photos with a cellphone.

Hobby Shooter

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #145 on: June 25, 2013, 12:59:21 PM »


The ONLY problems I've ever had, shooting documentaries all over the world and the country were in Louisiana - did 3 projects there.  Buncha crazy paranoids, I tell ya!  Maybe NO is different than the rest of the state (our crew mostly had run ins with police around Baton Rouge and then further south closer to Houma.  I'm sure you're a nice guy but honestly I spent almost a year there shooting those pieces and I don't care if I ever go back - beautiful scenery and the ladies are pretty too, but I really really was left with a bad impression of the people.
My goodness!!

I am so sorry to hear this, I really am. That just is not indicative of what is usually described about us....

Well, if you're every in the NOLA area, please drop me a line and I'll buy ya a couple of drinks....and who knows, bring your camera we *might* find something interesting to shoot in this town.

:)

C

Or come to Ottawa, Canada.... I've been on Parliament Hill, the seat of our nations government, with tripod and camera set up, merrily snapping away, and have had at least a dozen people come up to me, hand me a camera, and ask if I'd take their picture... Once, a pair of mounties (RCMP, Canada's national police force and providers of security on Parliament Hill), walked over to me and we started chatting about canoes... with a constant interruption from tourists who wanted their picture taken WITH the mounties.... Welcome to Canada, Eh?
Don, I've spent several years in the expat community in South East Asia. Some of the nicest and most gracious people are you Canadians. I have yet to go, but really look forward to do that when some of those guys are back in Toronto. Although they did make me increase my beer consumtion  ;)

serendipidy

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #146 on: June 25, 2013, 05:58:13 PM »


The ONLY problems I've ever had, shooting documentaries all over the world and the country were in Louisiana - did 3 projects there.  Buncha crazy paranoids, I tell ya!  Maybe NO is different than the rest of the state (our crew mostly had run ins with police around Baton Rouge and then further south closer to Houma.  I'm sure you're a nice guy but honestly I spent almost a year there shooting those pieces and I don't care if I ever go back - beautiful scenery and the ladies are pretty too, but I really really was left with a bad impression of the people.
My goodness!!

I am so sorry to hear this, I really am. That just is not indicative of what is usually described about us....

Well, if you're every in the NOLA area, please drop me a line and I'll buy ya a couple of drinks....and who knows, bring your camera we *might* find something interesting to shoot in this town.

:)

C

Or come to Ottawa, Canada.... I've been on Parliament Hill, the seat of our nations government, with tripod and camera set up, merrily snapping away, and have had at least a dozen people come up to me, hand me a camera, and ask if I'd take their picture... Once, a pair of mounties (RCMP, Canada's national police force and providers of security on Parliament Hill), walked over to me and we started chatting about canoes... with a constant interruption from tourists who wanted their picture taken WITH the mounties.... Welcome to Canada, Eh?
Don, I've spent several years in the expat community in South East Asia. Some of the nicest and most gracious people are you Canadians. I have yet to go, but really look forward to do that when some of those guys are back in Toronto. Although they did make me increase my beer consumtion  ;)

A cute story from two decades ago.
I was taking a 4 day long (English language) ski class in the Alps trying to improve my intermediate ski skills. Made up mostly of Brits, Canadians, Americans and Australians. On the last day, we were all having lunch on the slopes at a quaint restaurant eating outside on picnic tables. An obviously American couple walked past being loud and a little ostentatious. The middle-aged British lady sitting next to me turned to me and said "Those Americans can sometimes be so loud and annoying...not like you nice Canadians." I smiled and said politely "Yes ma'am, I know what you mean." She never did learn that I was an American. :)
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Hobby Shooter

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #147 on: June 25, 2013, 10:47:28 PM »


The ONLY problems I've ever had, shooting documentaries all over the world and the country were in Louisiana - did 3 projects there.  Buncha crazy paranoids, I tell ya!  Maybe NO is different than the rest of the state (our crew mostly had run ins with police around Baton Rouge and then further south closer to Houma.  I'm sure you're a nice guy but honestly I spent almost a year there shooting those pieces and I don't care if I ever go back - beautiful scenery and the ladies are pretty too, but I really really was left with a bad impression of the people.
My goodness!!

I am so sorry to hear this, I really am. That just is not indicative of what is usually described about us....

Well, if you're every in the NOLA area, please drop me a line and I'll buy ya a couple of drinks....and who knows, bring your camera we *might* find something interesting to shoot in this town.

:)

C

Or come to Ottawa, Canada.... I've been on Parliament Hill, the seat of our nations government, with tripod and camera set up, merrily snapping away, and have had at least a dozen people come up to me, hand me a camera, and ask if I'd take their picture... Once, a pair of mounties (RCMP, Canada's national police force and providers of security on Parliament Hill), walked over to me and we started chatting about canoes... with a constant interruption from tourists who wanted their picture taken WITH the mounties.... Welcome to Canada, Eh?
Don, I've spent several years in the expat community in South East Asia. Some of the nicest and most gracious people are you Canadians. I have yet to go, but really look forward to do that when some of those guys are back in Toronto. Although they did make me increase my beer consumtion  ;)

A cute story from two decades ago.
I was taking a 4 day long (English language) ski class in the Alps trying to improve my intermediate ski skills. Made up mostly of Brits, Canadians, Americans and Australians. On the last day, we were all having lunch on the slopes at a quaint restaurant eating outside on picnic tables. An obviously American couple walked past being loud and a little ostentatious. The middle-aged British lady sitting next to me turned to me and said "Those Americans can sometimes be so loud and annoying...not like you nice Canadians." I smiled and said politely "Yes ma'am, I know what you mean." She never did learn that I was an American. :)
There are nice Americans too  :D . Especially abroad, those are the ones that not only learn about the states in geography but also about other continents and countries... It's all about perspective.

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #147 on: June 25, 2013, 10:47:28 PM »

Hobby Shooter

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #148 on: June 25, 2013, 10:57:13 PM »
This came out wrong. I would say almost all Americans I've met on my travels are very nice people. Nothing else.

serendipidy

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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #149 on: June 25, 2013, 11:18:42 PM »
This came out wrong. I would say almost all Americans I've met on my travels are very nice people. Nothing else.

I didn't take it wrong :) I think there are nice people (and not so nice people) in every culture, country,ethnic background, etc. There are a lot of not so nice Americans too (just look at the crime statistics). I've been to Canada...imo, a great country with a great people. 8)
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Re: How to not get beat up when photographing public places?
« Reply #149 on: June 25, 2013, 11:18:42 PM »