Gear Talk > Software & Accessories

DxO Optics Pro

(1/3) > >>

lilmsmaggie:
Hi,
I’m relatively new to this forum.  In the past 8-12 mos., I’ve begun transitioning from film based photography to digital.  Even more recently, I purchased a 5D MK II.  I was already shooting with a Rebel T3i and the 24-105 f/4L.  While doing some research on the camera and the 24-105L f4, I happened to read SLRGear’s review on the later, where the reviewer mentions:

“Bottom line, the Canon 24-105mm f/4L is a really excellent optic, but once that struggles a bit along the edges and in the corners with full-frame bodies.  As such, it’s an almost ideal candidate for use with DxO Optics Pro, particularly if you’re shooting with a full-frame DSLR.”

I’ve completed a PC build that will be dedicated to image editing but I’ve loaded no software other than Windows 7 64-bit Professional.  I need to do some more work on the OS configuration and install all of those lovely windows security updates that I know are waiting for me.  In addition to Win 7, I have 16GB RAM (upgradeable to 32), 256GB SSD, and 2-2TB HDD’s.

Although I’ve used Photoshop CS3 in the past, I haven’t yet decided on purchasing the current version.     I do have a copy of Adobe LR4 but was curious about DxO Optics Pro. 

So now that I have the 24-105 and a full-frame DSLR, and in the process of installing image editing software, I was wondering how many of you out there include DxO Optics Pro as part of your image editing workflow?   Do you like the results you’re able to achieve with DxO Optics Pro as opposed to other software image editing tools that you currently use or have used?

Mt Spokane Photography:
I've tried it multiple times.
 
The good - It produces a very nice looking image without tinkering around.
 
The bad -
Its very s-l-o-w
You still need image management software
I do not like having all those xmp sidecar files that must be kept with the image file.
Lightroom 4 also corrects for distortion, and DPP has by far the best lens correction package, but you pay for it with a monster sized file.
 

lilmsmaggie:

--- Quote from: Mt Spokane Photography on March 24, 2013, 08:07:36 PM ---I've tried it multiple times.
 
The good - It produces a very nice looking image without tinkering around.
 
The bad -
Its very s-l-o-w
You still need image management software
I do not like having all those xmp sidecar files that must be kept with the image file.
Lightroom 4 also corrects for distortion, and DPP has by far the best lens correction package, but you pay for it with a monster sized file.

--- End quote ---

I've never used DPP -- and it's free!  I'll have to check it out. 

Thanks -- great advice.

pj1974:
I have been using DxO Optics Pro for some time now, and been through a number of upgrades / versions.

For my purposes, I really like it - batch processing - optimising my lens and camera outputs (I have 2 DSLR bodies and 5 lenses - all combinations of which are covered). It matches lenses and body combinations using modules, and produces high quality results. It's really targeted to doing batch work.

It's different to Photoshop.  I use Photoshop when I need to apply critical attention to individual photos (my 'favourite photos'  that I will upload, share, print, etc).  But in many cases DxO Optics Pro does a great enough job.

I use the latest version of DxO Optics Pro on a new 64bit quite fast PC - and it makes a noticeable difference (speed wise) operating under Windows 8 (64bit).  My photo management / view program is ACDSee. That way I feel I have the best of all worlds.

That's my take on it. Hope it's helpful!

Paul  :)

neuroanatomist:
I'm with Paul on this.  DxO's lens corrections and RAW conversion are excellent, IMO better than LR (slightly) and DPP in terms of output.  I use Aperture for library management.  DxO v8 is substantially faster than previous verisons.  If you're looking for an all-in-one solution, LR seems like a good choice.  I also use CS6 for creative image processing.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version