September 23, 2014, 10:41:51 AM

Author Topic: My full street photography kit and why my 5dmk3 is perfect for street shooting.  (Read 15118 times)

RS2021

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I think 70-300 mm isnt a good street focal range too plus its really noticable carrying such a big lens around. It also looks like a phallic symbol. RUDE! :D

True, you don't want to be arrested for....exposing yourself.... ;)

I know, I know...I need to be.... shot...  ;D
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miah

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That is akin to sniping.
Find yourself a good place to hide and wait?
Sorry mate, but this voyeurism, not street photography.
Having the balls to get up close and personal to take the shot in the first place is the whole point of street photography...

ET

P-a-h-le-a-s-e: "sniping", "voyeurism?" "Having the balls to get up close?" You need to grow some manners there, Evil Ted. If not, you're the photographer who will give the rest of us a bad name.

Thanks for your thoughtful reply, Mark. To be clear, I'm not disparaging your preference for shorter focal lengths--not at all--that's why I stated that I only wanted to add an additional point of view. I personally choose not to so narrowly define "street shooting" that I refuse to use the best tool for the job when a particular situation arises. Longer focal lengths can be quite useful and don't necessarily preclude the environment or up-close story-telling aspect of the image. How an image is conceived and framed along with its chosen point of view are independent of focal length.

That said, I hear you loud and clear and agree with your overarching philosophy: close encounters are the best.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2013, 10:29:24 PM by miah »
T3i • 10-22 • 15-85 • 70-300DO *** 5D3 • 35 f/2 • 50 f/1.8 • 24-105L • 100L • 70-300L • 35-350L • 400L f/5.6

Mark Carey

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That is akin to sniping.
Find yourself a good place to hide and wait?
Sorry mate, but this voyeurism, not street photography.
Having the balls to get up close and personal to take the shot in the first place is the whole point of street photography...

ET

P-a-h-le-a-s-e: "sniping", "voyeurism?" "Having the balls to get up close?" You need to grow some manners there, Evil Ted. If not, you're the photographer who will give the rest of us a bad name.

Thanks for your thoughtful reply, Mark. To be clear, I'm not disparaging your preference for shorter focal lengths--not at all--that's why I stated that I only wanted to add an additional point of view. I personally choose not to so narrowly define "street shooting" that I refuse to use the best tool for the job when a particular situation arises. Longer focal lengths can be quite useful and don't necessarily preclude the environment or up-close story-telling aspect of the image. How an image is conceived and framed along with its chosen point of view are independent of focal length.

That said, I hear you loud and clear and agree with your overarching philosophy: close encounters are the best!



My main point about lenses for me  is an aesthetic one since I am generally 'not' trying to engage with my subjects so. I talk quite a lot about this in my posts on the psychology behind my own street photography.
http://www.markcareyphotography.com/2013/street-photography-technique-and-psychology-guide-post-3-image-2/

The aesthetic is what requires me to shoot close an wide because it is the perspective afforded by moderately wide lenses like the 35mm which is so appealing. The perspective is very close to what the human eye would see and so you feel like you are standing there, and, of course you are! Longer lenses crunch up perspective in a totally different way and depth of field becomes minuscule.  Its just a different look. Its a look that for me suits portraiture very well but I personally would find it less engaging for wider scenes because it would look unnatural due to that perspective.

Clearly in this instance you were shooting a funeral so your use of a long lens was totally understandable in my opinion.






pedro

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Intresting thread here. I don't know if it was this site who featured Markus Hartel. He does a lot of SP either using a 5D series body and an 28 prime lens attached to it. He also did a project on The Americans 2010. Revisiting Robert Frank's track. In this project he did a lot by using a Leica range finder, the same way Frank worked back in the 50s.

http://www.markushartel.com/blog/
If you scroll this first one quite down a bit you'll find the "learn from Markus" section, which is very helpful and inspiring: http://www.markushartel.com/blog/category/learn-from-markus

http://www.markushartel.com/

http://www.hydeparkphotography.net/interview-with-markus-hartel/
« Last Edit: March 29, 2013, 07:30:58 AM by pedro »
30D, EF-S 10-22/ 5DIII, 16-35 F/2.8 L USM II, 28 F/2.8, 50 F/1.4, 85 F/1.8, 70-200 F/2.8 classic,
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miah

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My main point about lenses for me  is an aesthetic one since I am generally 'not' trying to engage with my subjects so. I talk quite a lot about this in my posts on the psychology behind my own street photography.
http://www.markcareyphotography.com/2013/street-photography-technique-and-psychology-guide-post-3-image-2/

The aesthetic is what requires me to shoot close an wide because it is the perspective afforded by moderately wide lenses like the 35mm which is so appealing. The perspective is very close to what the human eye would see and so you feel like you are standing there, and, of course you are! Longer lenses crunch up perspective in a totally different way and depth of field becomes minuscule.  Its just a different look. Its a look that for me suits portraiture very well but I personally would find it less engaging for wider scenes because it would look unnatural due to that perspective.

Clearly in this instance you were shooting a funeral so your use of a long lens was totally understandable in my opinion.
Point taken, Mark. I had previously read your blog and found it quite interesting; thanks.

One issue I have, since I travel by dirt bike, is weight and bulk. I've found I have to leave a lot of gear at home and carry maybe two lenses: a 24-105 & 70-300. These cover a range for everything from landscapes to wildlife. I hate to leave my 100 macro behind, but tough choices must be made. Regarding 35 vs 50 vs 24-105 zoom, do you feel it would be worth the stretch to add a 35 or 50 to the mix, in addition to the 24-105, and if so, which focal length would be your hands-down favorite?

I'm returning to your neck of the woods for 3 months (Nov - Jan in Thailand, Laos, Cambodia & Viet Nam) and want to spend more time off my bike and on the street with camera in-hand. If you advise that a fast, short prime is a must, I might be able to find a nook or cranny to squeeze it in.

Intresting thread here. I don't know if it was this site who featured Markus Hartel. He does a lot of SP either using a 5D series body and an 28 prime lens attached to it. He also did a project on The Americans 2010. Revisiting Robert Frank's track. In this project he did a lot by using a Leica range finder, the same way Frank worked back in the 50s.
Thanks for the link, pedro. Good stuff!
T3i • 10-22 • 15-85 • 70-300DO *** 5D3 • 35 f/2 • 50 f/1.8 • 24-105L • 100L • 70-300L • 35-350L • 400L f/5.6

EvilTed

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That is akin to sniping.
Find yourself a good place to hide and wait?
Sorry mate, but this voyeurism, not street photography.
Having the balls to get up close and personal to take the shot in the first place is the whole point of street photography...

ET

Get over yourself and go out and shoot.
Once you learn something about the streets, please come back and share...

ET

P-a-h-le-a-s-e: "sniping", "voyeurism?" "Having the balls to get up close?" You need to grow some manners there, Evil Ted. If not, you're the photographer who will give the rest of us a bad name.

Thanks for your thoughtful reply, Mark. To be clear, I'm not disparaging your preference for shorter focal lengths--not at all--that's why I stated that I only wanted to add an additional point of view. I personally choose not to so narrowly define "street shooting" that I refuse to use the best tool for the job when a particular situation arises. Longer focal lengths can be quite useful and don't necessarily preclude the environment or up-close story-telling aspect of the image. How an image is conceived and framed along with its chosen point of view are independent of focal length.

That said, I hear you loud and clear and agree with your overarching philosophy: close encounters are the best!

distant.star

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That is akin to sniping.
Find yourself a good place to hide and wait?
Sorry mate, but this voyeurism, not street photography.
Having the balls to get up close and personal to take the shot in the first place is the whole point of street photography...

ET

Probably could be better said.

I'm not a big fan of "sniping" or "voyeurism" but in the quoted context, they're inappropriate terms. Grieving people can be sensitive, and there is no good reason to appear to possibly disrespect their rituals.

As for what is or is not "street photography," there are as many definitions as there are people with cameras. Generally considered it can be characterized as candid photography of people in public places. Beyond that, it's all up for grabs. A father at disneyworld taking pictures of his kids engaged in horsing around with one another can legitimately be considered street photography. Bruce Gilden jams a camera and flash in someone's face on the street, captures a startled look, and it's considered street photography. It's all over the map, and we get in trouble trying to define it for others.

Finally, balls are not what it really takes to get "up close and personal" in street photography. The first requirement is a care for other people and a desire to validate their lives. We are not alone, or as Donne wrote, "no man is an island," and our connections with others is, I think, the most powerful driving force for good street photography. Like asking for a first date, our early efforts at photographing people we don't know may be nerve-jarring. If you do it for the right reasons, eventually it becomes comfortable -- perhaps like the familiarity of a marriage.

There is an iconic image of protest during the Vietnam war (maybe from Kent State) where a protester puts the stem of a flower into the bore of a soldier's rifle during a confrontation. Perphas it would be equally helpful for street photograpers to tape a flower on our cameras. At worse, it might increase the smile quotient.
Walter: Were you listening to The Dude's story? Donny: I was bowling. Walter: So you have no frame of reference here, Donny. You're like a child who wanders into the middle of a movie and wants to know...

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Mark Carey

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My main point about lenses for me  is an aesthetic one since I am generally 'not' trying to engage with my subjects so. I talk quite a lot about this in my posts on the psychology behind my own street photography.
http://www.markcareyphotography.com/2013/street-photography-technique-and-psychology-guide-post-3-image-2/

The aesthetic is what requires me to shoot close an wide because it is the perspective afforded by moderately wide lenses like the 35mm which is so appealing. The perspective is very close to what the human eye would see and so you feel like you are standing there, and, of course you are! Longer lenses crunch up perspective in a totally different way and depth of field becomes minuscule.  Its just a different look. Its a look that for me suits portraiture very well but I personally would find it less engaging for wider scenes because it would look unnatural due to that perspective.

Clearly in this instance you were shooting a funeral so your use of a long lens was totally understandable in my opinion.
Point taken, Mark. I had previously read your blog and found it quite interesting; thanks.

One issue I have, since I travel by dirt bike, is weight and bulk. I've found I have to leave a lot of gear at home and carry maybe two lenses: a 24-105 & 70-300. These cover a range for everything from landscapes to wildlife. I hate to leave my 100 macro behind, but tough choices must be made. Regarding 35 vs 50 vs 24-105 zoom, do you feel it would be worth the stretch to add a 35 or 50 to the mix, in addition to the 24-105, and if so, which focal length would be your hands-down favorite?

I'm returning to your neck of the woods for 3 months (Nov - Jan in Thailand, Laos, Cambodia & Viet Nam) and want to spend more time off my bike and on the street with camera in-hand. If you advise that a fast, short prime is a must, I might be able to find a nook or cranny to squeeze it in.

Intresting thread here. I don't know if it was this site who featured Markus Hartel. He does a lot of SP either using a 5D series body and an 28 prime lens attached to it. He also did a project on The Americans 2010. Revisiting Robert Frank's track. In this project he did a lot by using a Leica range finder, the same way Frank worked back in the 50s.
Thanks for the link, pedro. Good stuff!


Weight is an important consideration for me. While Im travelling I find opportunities to shoot documentary stuff all the time and do so. I find I really miss my 24-70 for this and since the Canon  new 24-70 is such and amazing lens.
http://www.markcareyphotography.com/2012/jo-and-karim-canon-ef-24-70mm-f2-8-ii-usm-l-review/
...I really missed it on this trip. its lighter and just an all round better lens than the old one.

I can however get by the the 35 and 50 if I had to. Next time Ill probably ditch the 50 and take the 35 and 24-70 just to keep weight down and flexibility high. For street work I think the size of a 24-70 would spook too many people so it is 35mm f2 all the way.
I would definitely squeeze a 35mm f2 into your kit. The psychological aspects of shooting with such a small lens are not to be understated and its really small and light. It also shoots at f2 which can get you out of a few low-light scrapes....



Mark Carey

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That is akin to sniping.
Find yourself a good place to hide and wait?
Sorry mate, but this voyeurism, not street photography.
Having the balls to get up close and personal to take the shot in the first place is the whole point of street photography...

ET

Probably could be better said.

I'm not a big fan of "sniping" or "voyeurism" but in the quoted context, they're inappropriate terms. Grieving people can be sensitive, and there is no good reason to appear to possibly disrespect their rituals.

As for what is or is not "street photography," there are as many definitions as there are people with cameras. Generally considered it can be characterized as candid photography of people in public places. Beyond that, it's all up for grabs. A father at disneyworld taking pictures of his kids engaged in horsing around with one another can legitimately be considered street photography. Bruce Gilden jams a camera and flash in someone's face on the street, captures a startled look, and it's considered street photography. It's all over the map, and we get in trouble trying to define it for others.

Finally, balls are not what it really takes to get "up close and personal" in street photography. The first requirement is a care for other people and a desire to validate their lives. We are not alone, or as Donne wrote, "no man is an island," and our connections with others is, I think, the most powerful driving force for good street photography. Like asking for a first date, our early efforts at photographing people we don't know may be nerve-jarring. If you do it for the right reasons, eventually it becomes comfortable -- perhaps like the familiarity of a marriage.

There is an iconic image of protest during the Vietnam war (maybe from Kent State) where a protester puts the stem of a flower into the bore of a soldier's rifle during a confrontation. Perphas it would be equally helpful for street photograpers to tape a flower on our cameras. At worse, it might increase the smile quotient.


Your thoughts re Bruce Gilden are almost verbatim what I wrote on my FB page a few days ago responding to someone. I wrote this.....

..........'For example, I find Bruce Gildens off camera flash in your face, scaring the S___ out of you, photographing the result and saying how you 'know its a street photo if you can smell the street' - well, dubious at best. But some love it and most would call him a street photographer....'

Ewinter

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Quote
Having the balls to get up close and personal to take the shot in the first place is the whole point of street photography...
Wrong. Taking pictures on the street is the point of street photography

And whether I'm using 100mm or 35mm, it still doesn't matter if you don't know what you're doing. That was my point, not that 100mm is better than any shorter focal length

expatinasia

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It always makes me chuckle when I see people use tape to hide the Canon logo etc.

You are generally very safe in south east Asia, probably much more so than in many western countries, but the idea that putting tape on a camera is going to make you any less attractive to an opportune mugger, does not imvho make any sense. I would imagine that to most in need of a quick fix of cash - for whatever purpose - are perfectly happy with whichever brand of camera you may have. In fact, a smart mugger might even wonder why you had gone to the bother of trying to conceal the camera as something it is not (ie. non-branded, older, broken etc) and take even more interest in it.

Still this thread seems to be a good way for Mark to advertise his website. No harm there, I guess.
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archiea

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Yeah... just another day of street photography... don't mind me...  :o



Here's my kit!  granted with this glass I can do street photography from  a street in ANOTHER ZIP CODE from my subject... but hey..

EdB

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That is akin to sniping.
Find yourself a good place to hide and wait?
Sorry mate, but this voyeurism, not street photography.
Having the balls to get up close and personal to take the shot in the first place is the whole point of street photography...

ET

P-a-h-le-a-s-e: "sniping", "voyeurism?" "Having the balls to get up close?" You need to grow some manners there, Evil Ted. If not, you're the photographer who will give the rest of us a bad name.


Shooting with a long lens is just as disrespectful as getting up close. If you believe the people you are photographing don't want to be photographed in their grief then don't do it from any distance. That type of photography gives us just as much as a bad name.

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archiea

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This post is a supplement to my earlier blog post on the Psychology and technique in street photography.  I am an experienced street photographer shooting predominantly in India and South East Asia. I have for the last year or so moved over to a 5dmk3 as my main camera and the more I use it the more I like it.

If you are interested to see what I think of this camera, good and bad, and what other gear I use please take a look.

Thanks.
Mark.

http://www.markcareyphotography.com/2013/my-street-photography-kit/

C'mon mark, don't you want to walk around with one of these BIG WHITE-ZILLA LENSES in your travels....


Canon BLING at its best!!!!

RS2021

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It always makes me chuckle when I see people use tape to hide the Canon logo etc.

Still this thread seems to be a good way for Mark to advertise his website. No harm there, I guess.

+1

Ding ding ding ;)
“Sharpness is a bourgeois concept” - Henri Cartier-Bresson

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