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Author Topic: Black blob problem  (Read 4650 times)

JonB8305

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Re: Black blob problem
« Reply #15 on: May 02, 2013, 06:03:17 PM »
Shooting a black object is not so much about pumping kwatts of light to it or raising shadows. Its all in the reflections /highlights. Play around with some reflectors and/or big softboxes and you'll see you can actually shoot anything black with great definition even in a dark room.

thanks for the help.

Will reflectors help me avoid the necessity of using a 4 light set up.

http://www.modelmayhem.com/education/photography/5959-building-your-set-softbox-by-softbox

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Re: Black blob problem
« Reply #15 on: May 02, 2013, 06:03:17 PM »

JonB8305

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Re: Black blob problem
« Reply #16 on: May 02, 2013, 06:04:51 PM »
1. better lighting
2. shoot raw and learn raw processing
3. learn what contrast means.

I realize my technique needs improvement, I'm just getting started with the studio lights.

I just started shooting raw as well and post processing has been very easy.


Aglet

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Re: Black blob problem
« Reply #17 on: May 02, 2013, 09:17:51 PM »
lighting technique, not just how much and what kind but from what angles

full manual exposure & lighting control for consistent results

shoot raw files, jpgs are too limited unless you've nailed the settings perfectly (in manual)

in a studio, you are in full control and should not be subject to the vagueries of in-camera metering from shot to shot.

play, learn.  don't get too bogged down by various exposure setting paradigms, the end results are to light and expose properly to not clip whites or crush dark shades to black.

Once you get a handle on what you need to do, you'll likely find full manual is the way to go for consistency.  This is where your custom user settings on your camera come in handy, saving all your studio settings for instant recall with a turn of the dial.  If you have enough custom memories, you can save setups for different configurations and have a good starting pont when you want to adapt something.

the range from dark black tux to shimmery white gown can be covered within almost any camera's dynamic range limitations, even Canon's ;)

privatebydesign

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Re: Black blob problem
« Reply #18 on: May 02, 2013, 11:55:29 PM »
Quote
the range from dark black tux to shimmery white gown can be covered within almost any camera's dynamic range limitations, even Canon's ;)
Quote
the end results are to light and expose properly to not clip whites or crush dark shades to black.
Not by everybody, it would appear.............http://www.canonrumors.com/forum/index.php?topic=12844.msg230714#msg230714

So many inconsistencies in such a short post.

For instance, I fail to see how, if you are shooting in manual as you advise, you are ever at  "the vagueries [sic] of in-camera metering from shot to shot." whether in a studio or not.

I would value your advice about the same as your wedding photography.
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dgatwood

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Re: Black blob problem
« Reply #19 on: May 04, 2013, 12:50:16 AM »
For instance, I fail to see how, if you are shooting in manual as you advise, you are ever at  "the vagueries [sic] of in-camera metering from shot to shot." whether in a studio or not.

Vagueries is a legal spelling, according to Wiktionary, albeit a fairly rare one.

I assume what the author means is that in-camera metering gives you an overall measurement of the shot as a whole, but it will vary from shot to shot as people change angles and their tuxes reflect more or less light.  Therefore, it isn't as ideal a tool as an intern walking around with a good light meter and taking measurements at various parts of your set.

That said, this is me speaking with my video hat on.  I have no idea how you would do the same thing when using flashes without really annoying the heck out of your subject.  :)

As for the other comment, the usual goal is to light and expose the shot properly so that you don't clip any important white detail and so that important dark detail doesn't get lost in the mud.  What constitutes "important" white/dark detail, however, varies....


Will reflectors help me avoid the necessity of using a 4 light set up.

Depends on the look you're trying to achieve.  I've seen a lot of nice portrait shots taken with only a key light and a fill.  That said, sometimes you want a backlight on the person and/or a light on the background.

I'd be surprised if a reflector were ever useful as an alternative to a backlight or a background light, but you might be able to get away with using a reflector instead of a fill light in some situations.  I'm not sure how well that would work in practice—it would depend in part on on the number of people in the shot, on how reflective the reflector is, and on whether you can come up with a position where it reflects enough of your key light or backlight to do any good without blocking the shot.
« Last Edit: May 04, 2013, 12:59:40 AM by dgatwood »

JonB8305

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Re: Black blob problem
« Reply #20 on: May 04, 2013, 12:24:40 PM »
For instance, I fail to see how, if you are shooting in manual as you advise, you are ever at  "the vagueries [sic] of in-camera metering from shot to shot." whether in a studio or not.

Vagueries is a legal spelling, according to Wiktionary, albeit a fairly rare one.

I assume what the author means is that in-camera metering gives you an overall measurement of the shot as a whole, but it will vary from shot to shot as people change angles and their tuxes reflect more or less light.  Therefore, it isn't as ideal a tool as an intern walking around with a good light meter and taking measurements at various parts of your set.

That said, this is me speaking with my video hat on.  I have no idea how you would do the same thing when using flashes without really annoying the heck out of your subject.  :)

As for the other comment, the usual goal is to light and expose the shot properly so that you don't clip any important white detail and so that important dark detail doesn't get lost in the mud.  What constitutes "important" white/dark detail, however, varies....


Will reflectors help me avoid the necessity of using a 4 light set up.

Depends on the look you're trying to achieve.  I've seen a lot of nice portrait shots taken with only a key light and a fill.  That said, sometimes you want a backlight on the person and/or a light on the background.

I'd be surprised if a reflector were ever useful as an alternative to a backlight or a background light, but you might be able to get away with using a reflector instead of a fill light in some situations.  I'm not sure how well that would work in practice—it would depend in part on on the number of people in the shot, on how reflective the reflector is, and on whether you can come up with a position where it reflects enough of your key light or backlight to do any good without blocking the shot.

Damn I'm really trying to avoid buying another Profoto Kit. I need some back light alternatives.

privatebydesign

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Re: Black blob problem
« Reply #21 on: May 04, 2013, 01:04:36 PM »
Jon,

Watch these videos to get an idea. If this guy can get a white seamless and subject illumination with ONE flashgun, I am sure, with a little more thought, you can achieve more with your current Profoto kit.

Relax, there is tons of info out there, but this place is basically Canon centric gearheads, not studio lighters.

http://www.zarias.com/white-seamless-tutorial-part-1-gear-space/
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Re: Black blob problem
« Reply #21 on: May 04, 2013, 01:04:36 PM »

privatebydesign

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Re: Black blob problem
« Reply #22 on: May 05, 2013, 07:03:00 PM »
Quote
Quote
"the vagueries [sic] of in-camera metering from shot to shot."

"Vagueries is a legal spelling, according to Wiktionary, albeit a fairly rare one."

There can be little doubt that in the context of the use by Aglet, he meant to write vagarities (irregularity) rather than vagueries (the condition of being vague). After all the light meter is never vague, it always reports the same thing, the exposure needed to achieve 18% grey. It could be considered to give irregular exposures if you don't understand what, exactly, it is metering; and certainly manual mode will overcome any irregularity in exposure values suggested by a reflective meter when shooting moving predominantly large light or dark subjects.
« Last Edit: May 05, 2013, 08:20:38 PM by privatebydesign »
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dgatwood

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Re: Black blob problem
« Reply #23 on: May 05, 2013, 10:44:36 PM »
Damn I'm really trying to avoid buying another Profoto Kit. I need some back light alternatives.

If you were doing video shooting, I'd suggest picking up a $30 halogen work lamp from Home Depot and clamping it to a mic stand.  Unfortunately, as soon as you add flashes into the mix, that sort of setup probably won't be very user-friendly.

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Re: Black blob problem
« Reply #23 on: May 05, 2013, 10:44:36 PM »