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Author Topic: Do you trust your camera?  (Read 7993 times)

Marsu42

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Do you trust your camera?
« on: May 06, 2013, 06:07:02 PM »
When shooting scenes that I consider to be "keepers", with my 60d I am always taking multiple shots because I fear the af won't be spot on. The actual "real" af misses are maybe 5%, however more often the large af points miss slightly when trying to af on small points for example the eyes of a horse looking towards me.

Another issue is IS which only improves statistically so even with good IS systems like 100L and 70-300L I always take multiple shots because in my experience there are visible differences even with the same settings.

That's part of the reason why I'm now @120k shutter cycles, apart from running focus stacks and bracketing. Also sorting through very similar shots and deciding which is a little better than the other is annoying and time-consuming.

I'm wondering: Am I doing something wrong or different than other people? If you have a 60d or other cameras (what about 6d/5d3), do you trust your af and lenses so much that you  take just one shot even of important scenes?
« Last Edit: May 06, 2013, 06:08:52 PM by Marsu42 »

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Do you trust your camera?
« on: May 06, 2013, 06:07:02 PM »

RLPhoto

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #1 on: May 06, 2013, 06:08:32 PM »
Yes, I trust my 5d3 using single point AF on Any cross-type point's @ Any Aperture on a still subject.

Moving subjects I will always take a few extra shots if shooting Sub F/2.8.
« Last Edit: May 06, 2013, 06:10:18 PM by RLPhoto »

Drizzt321

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #2 on: May 06, 2013, 06:34:37 PM »
I trust my camera, but only to a certain point. I just learn the limitations, and where it starts to no longer function quite as desired, and then figure out a workaround if necessary.

Granted, I have a 5d3, but was shooting a 5d2 before. Really it comes down to experience with your equipment, regardless of what it is. Once you have the requisite experience, and know the strengths and weaknesses, you have trust that you can get the image you want with what you have. It sounds like you've shot a lot of photos, but have you really thought about what you are doing and why during certain types of subjects and situations you are photographing? Have you tried shooting one way, then shooting a different way in similar situations and see if one way gives you better images (subject to what you consider a better image)?

One thing which would help you (if Canon would implement it) is AFMA which can help avoid AF misses due to slight front/back focusing problems. Your idea to take multiple shots is a good one, especially if you are working with a low shutter speed since your 2nd or 3rd photo will likely when you are in a more stable position, instead of slightly moving the camera as you press the shutter button.
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neuroanatomist

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #3 on: May 06, 2013, 06:44:56 PM »
I didn't trust my 5DII - I always took multiple shots so I could pick the the best.

I trust my 1D X - I always take multiple shots because I leave it set to 12 fps, and even a brief press of the shutter fires off 2-3 frames.  ;)  I agree that sorting through them is a bit annoying, as I really don't need to delete due to missed focus. But with kids, it helps because I almost always get one with no blinks.
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Mt Spokane Photography

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #4 on: May 06, 2013, 07:02:34 PM »
I've had most Canon DSLR's and a few from Nikon.  The only one that did not turn out mostly good photos was the D800, it required good light and then it was excellent.
 
I do try to pay attention to my settings, if I set them wrong, its not the fault of the camera.  I find a very low rate of poor images. 

bholliman

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #5 on: May 06, 2013, 07:36:46 PM »
I trust my camera, but only to a certain point.

I generally trust both my 6D and 7D, but never enough to only take one shot of something important.
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Marsu42

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #6 on: May 06, 2013, 08:00:49 PM »
Once you have the requisite experience, and know the strengths and weaknesses, you have trust that you can get the image you want with what you have.

With the 60d I somehow doubt this :-o I still find it so damn hard to af on a tiny spot you can barely see in the crop vf or with a thin dof in macro. And I have been getting so much better during the last two years, but the af problem persists - that's why I'm asking now in this thread.

Have you tried shooting one way, then shooting a different way in similar situations and see if one way gives you better images (subject to what you consider a better image)?

Absolutely, I have been trying everything imaginable and now have some grasp of what is easy or hard and what I have to get right in camera and what can be fixed in post if necessary.

Also I should note that I am trying to get good shots @100% crop just for the sake of gaining experience, if I was aiming for a specific downsized res I wouldn't make such a fuzz.

One thing which would help you (if Canon would implement it) is AFMA which can help avoid AF misses due to slight front/back focusing problems.

Afma isn't the problem, except maybe with the 100L @macro distance and f2.8.

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #6 on: May 06, 2013, 08:00:49 PM »

docholliday

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #7 on: May 06, 2013, 08:08:50 PM »
Coming from large format and medium format, I learn to trust my cameras quite well. When you have 1, 2 or 12 frames max per roll, you tend to be careful when hitting the release. That's carried over and I learn the limitations of my 1D/1Ds 3's and still treat them like it was film. Of course, I still carry a L-758 when I'm really worried about exposure and when I switch over to the 1VHS, it comes in nice to keep the good habits!

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #8 on: May 06, 2013, 08:35:22 PM »
Generally yes, no problems at all. I have a 5D3. Depending on what I am shooting I will sometimes take multiple exposures, the camera will miss focus sometimes, but mostly it's me that messes things up. Normally that I forget to change settings to get the exposure right. I had a portrait shoot on Sunday afternoon and as it got darker I had to keep up with the fading light, I cam out fine in the end but missed some shots due to myself not compensating for the changing conditions quick enough.

Aglet

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #9 on: May 06, 2013, 08:53:20 PM »
Of all the cameras I trusted, my 60D is still one of the best for getting that shot, it's my go-to camera if I'm running out of the house to catch something.  Unless it was fast action or other serious focus challenges in which case the 7D did a better job.  (no 1D for me) 40D and Rebels' AF was adequate for most of what I used them for and rarely let me down.
That said, I've never really had to worry much about AF issues with any of my cameras and the only one that ever gave me exposure grief was my 5D2 which could be all over the place tho usually under by varying amounts.  HATED that camera.  My 40D could miss exposure too sometimes but since I use manual whenever possible, these are not common issues.
Some AF misses with the D800 in challenging conditions but otherwise very solid performer that meets my expectations very well.  The little d5100, considering its sparse AF coverage and only 1 cross type in the center performs well beyond my expectations.
Pentax K52s is a quirky beast I'm still getting used to, AF performance varies greatly from lens to lens.  AE performance is often pretty good but I had some odd metering behavior begin with it the other day that I have to test out.

That said, I RARELY shoot multiples of images.  I only machine-gun the subject when it's living, then you have a better chance of getting a good expression.  I'd now prefer to miss a shot here or there than have to constantly wade thru too many.  A leftover from film-shooting days.

Don Haines

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #10 on: May 06, 2013, 09:37:54 PM »
I don't trust my camera.... that's why I never leave it home alone... who knows what it will be up to.

Seriously though, I trust it for landscape shooting, but when it comes to wildlife I just seem to keep shooting.... the little varmints move so it's hard to know what will be a good shot until you get it home and look at it on a big screen.
I was out in the canoe on saturday and came back with 240 or so turtle pictures... you know how it is....

I find that the 100L and the 70-200, and even the 50F1.8 are just bang-on focus every time.... it is amazing! I have an 18-200 that has about a 90% hit rate and a Sigma 120-400 that has about a 80% hit rate. For me it's not a question of trusting the camera (60D), it's a question of trusting the lens.
« Last Edit: May 06, 2013, 09:41:31 PM by Don Haines »
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Dylan777

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #11 on: May 06, 2013, 09:57:01 PM »
Yes, I trust my 5d3 using single point AF on Any cross-type point's @ Any Aperture on a still subject.

+1.... and when the kids start running, I use AI Servo with 8points exp mode, option #2. Keeper is very high. Another reason to love CF Lexar 1000X.
« Last Edit: May 06, 2013, 09:58:34 PM by Dylan777 »
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sanj

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #12 on: May 06, 2013, 10:03:59 PM »
It all depends upon the situation. If all was well before I clicked: exposure, focus etc I TOTALLY trust the camera.

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #12 on: May 06, 2013, 10:03:59 PM »

agierke

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #13 on: May 06, 2013, 11:56:58 PM »
i cant say that i ever really trusted anything in photography. so many things can go wrong or malfunction or under perform. its why we tend to have backups to almost everything.

i trust myself after i have done all the pre prep that i can. my trust doesn't extend to a machine.
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Vossie

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #14 on: May 09, 2013, 03:10:48 PM »
I trust my camera so I am not afraid of taking single shots (for static objects). When taking pictures from people (especially kids) I do, however, take multiple shots as facial expression is never the same in a sequence. Sifting out the best is indeed not the most fun part of the process.
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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #14 on: May 09, 2013, 03:10:48 PM »