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Author Topic: Do you trust your camera?  (Read 8218 times)

RGF

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #15 on: May 09, 2013, 03:30:35 PM »
I may trust the camera but I don't trust the photographer (me) so I always take a few extra as insurance.

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #15 on: May 09, 2013, 03:30:35 PM »

brad goda

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #16 on: May 09, 2013, 04:46:03 PM »
trust in camera or what you see.
if critical image making I use capture mode (capture one pro) and view image on at least a 20" monitor... yes on location.   
for an important image there are usually more than just my eyes that need to scrutinize the image making process.

rihanishtiaq

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #17 on: May 11, 2013, 08:15:43 AM »
I rather don't trust my hands when I am at a shutter speed less than 1/60s.

I always take multiple shots for these kinds of scenarios.
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sandymandy

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #18 on: May 11, 2013, 08:22:01 AM »
I dont trust my 50mm 1.8 II. It seriously fucks up focussing sometimes. Using the center point only it gave me back focus in a daylight scene 3 times in a row. I mean...really? I checked after every shot and moved a little and also focussed a little different but ALWAYS the same. So i said screw it and kept the backfocus shots :P

pdirestajr

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #19 on: May 11, 2013, 09:03:01 AM »
I believe the majority of "focusing issues" are user errors and not gear related. The key is knowing exactly how your tools work in any given situation, then trust yourself.
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3kramd5

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #20 on: May 11, 2013, 11:05:26 AM »
I tend to trust my center AF. The others are fine for landscape, but hit and miss for portraiture (unfortunately).
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bornshooter

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #21 on: May 11, 2013, 11:48:19 AM »
I didn't trust my 5DII - I always took multiple shots so I could pick the the best.

I trust my 1D X - I always take multiple shots because I leave it set to 12 fps, and even a brief press of the shutter fires off 2-3 frames.  ;)  I agree that sorting through them is a bit annoying, as I really don't need to delete due to missed focus. But with kids, it helps because I almost always get one with no blinks.
I just watched a video on youtube with jeff cable he does the same i guess that is the only problem sorting through them all.

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #21 on: May 11, 2013, 11:48:19 AM »

neuroanatomist

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #22 on: May 11, 2013, 11:59:47 AM »
I didn't trust my 5DII - I always took multiple shots so I could pick the the best.

I trust my 1D X - I always take multiple shots because I leave it set to 12 fps, and even a brief press of the shutter fires off 2-3 frames.  ;)  I agree that sorting through them is a bit annoying, as I really don't need to delete due to missed focus. But with kids, it helps because I almost always get one with no blinks.
I just watched a video on youtube with jeff cable he does the same i guess that is the only problem sorting through them all.

Doesn't take long. Aperture can automatically 'stack' photos taken within a given time interval, so I can open the whole burst with one click. Then I can pick the one to keep, running the loupe over them if needed to help select, and delete the rest with a keystroke.
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Daniel Flather

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #23 on: May 11, 2013, 12:06:56 PM »
I'm always shooting F1.2-1.4 at close range, so I over run it a little.
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Stewbyyy

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #24 on: May 11, 2013, 01:12:30 PM »
I shoot with 2 1D Mark IIN's and no, I don't really trust them. I always have the two of them with me in case one kicks out, and I always take multiple photos with each. Even though my keeper rate is about 98% I never trust the AF to be perfect as it's cost me 1 or 2 important shots in my history with the camera.

When I still had a 40D as a backup camera (until about a month ago) I never trusted it. My keeper rate was about 15%, it was terrible. I couldn't use or trust the camera at all, everything was always slightly soft (maybe it was just that I was used to the significantly better APS-H IQ...). I really only had it for the very worst case scenario.

I always trusted my old 60D and 500D before that. Trusted them 100%. It was only when I got more serious with photography that I started trusting my gear less.

bornshooter

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #25 on: May 11, 2013, 01:59:44 PM »
I didn't trust my 5DII - I always took multiple shots so I could pick the the best.

I trust my 1D X - I always take multiple shots because I leave it set to 12 fps, and even a brief press of the shutter fires off 2-3 frames.  ;)  I agree that sorting through them is a bit annoying, as I really don't need to delete due to missed focus. But with kids, it helps because I almost always get one with no blinks.
I just watched a video on youtube with jeff cable he does the same i guess that is the only problem sorting through them all.

Doesn't take long. Aperture can automatically 'stack' photos taken within a given time interval, so I can open the whole burst with one click. Then I can pick the one to keep, running the loupe over them if needed to help select, and delete the rest with a keystroke.
What do you think of aperture?i use lightroom and on occasion go into photoshop.

neuroanatomist

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #26 on: May 11, 2013, 02:04:38 PM »
What do you think of aperture?i use lightroom and on occasion go into photoshop.

I like Aperture - a great UI and excellent for library management.  But not a great RAW converter - I triage in Aperture, use DxO for RAW conversions, then bring the jpgs into Aperture.  I use CS6 for creative editing.
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sdsr

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #27 on: May 11, 2013, 03:20:32 PM »
I trust the camera more than I trust myself.   That said, I've owned and rented several different DSLRs over the past few years and my success rate is higher than warrants the number of "just in case" shots I take.  But it does vary with different body/lens combinations.  One of the factors that persuaded me to switch from my Pentax K5 to a 5DII was the superior performance mechanically of the Canon lenses I tried; a much smaller proportion of the photos I took were out of focus after I made the switch, smaller still when I added a 6D (and smaller than my experiences with Nikon D3100 and D600).  I find the fail rate of the 6D + 70-300L combination satisfyingly close to zero.  If I'm in a situation where the fail rate is likely to be higher - e.g. very shallow depth of focus such that the slightest movement by me or the subject will screw it up - then I'll take more.  (I only ever shoot hand-held; the answer might be different if I regularly used a tripod.)

[I must say, though, that my mirrorless camera - Olympus OMD - is in a completely different class in terms of accuracy than any DSLR I've used; if it thinks it has focused accurately, it has (like DSLRs it occasionally won't focus at all, but that's a different matter).  Whether this is because mirrorless focusing mechanisms are inherently more accurate, because you can place the focus point anywhere on the image, because the lenses are well designed, because of something in specifically in the design of the OMD, or some combination of these factors, I can't say; but if it weren't for habit I doubt I would be taking "just in case" shots with it except in special cases (e.g. when I'm using a macro lens).]

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #27 on: May 11, 2013, 03:20:32 PM »

FunPhotons

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #28 on: May 11, 2013, 03:46:23 PM »
5DmII.

I trust it to get a detailed image with good colors, because I force the colors on it by doing on location WB and post process camera color calibration. I partially trust its metering because it does a pretty OK job here usually, but I'll often shoot manual. I don't trust AF as half the time it will get it either wrong, or will just hunt for focus.

alexanderferdinand

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #29 on: May 11, 2013, 04:07:39 PM »
Yes to the cameras, no to the humans. This is me and my errors, and the erratic behaviour of humans, growing logarithmic with their number.
Closed (and espacially halfclosed) are the classic non- keepers.

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Re: Do you trust your camera?
« Reply #29 on: May 11, 2013, 04:07:39 PM »