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Author Topic: Very Stuck Filter  (Read 6478 times)

Hector1970

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Very Stuck Filter
« on: May 31, 2013, 05:50:34 AM »
Hi All,
I dropped a 70-200MM F2.8 II a pretty heavy lens head first onto a wooden floor.
There wasn't much damage, the lens itself seems to be functioning pretty well.
The UV filter however is dented and rigidly stuck in place.
I've tried all the normal methods of filter removal.
ie: Rubber Band, A Lens Filter Wrench (which I especially bought to remove it - These weren't great. They don't grip that much, with the filter there isn't that much to grip anyway), by hand, shoving it into a rubber mat and twisting etc.
I even put it in a freezer to see if that made any difference.
I had settled on just leaving it there stuck, the glass in the filter is fine.
My problem is I can't attach my 10 stop filter to it - and I'd like to be able to do that.


Anyone got a good idea about what to try next?
I've seen a Youtube demonstration of scoring the glass tapping it and removing it and then hacksawing the filter to weaken it and then removing it. This seems fraught with danger to the lens.

I can't be the first person this happened too. I am hoping somebody has a winning suggestion.
The filter is a Hoya so I assume it's aluminum (but not sure).
I was told if it was brass I might have had some chance.

Your in hope
Fergal

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Very Stuck Filter
« on: May 31, 2013, 05:50:34 AM »


bornshooter

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Re: Very Stuck Filter
« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2013, 06:47:34 AM »
Hi All,
I dropped a 70-200MM F2.8 II a pretty heavy lens head first onto a wooden floor.
There wasn't much damage, the lens itself seems to be functioning pretty well.
The UV filter however is dented and rigidly stuck in place.
I've tried all the normal methods of filter removal.
ie: Rubber Band, A Lens Filter Wrench (which I especially bought to remove it - These weren't great. They don't grip that much, with the filter there isn't that much to grip anyway), by hand, shoving it into a rubber mat and twisting etc.
I even put it in a freezer to see if that made any difference.
I had settled on just leaving it there stuck, the glass in the filter is fine.
My problem is I can't attach my 10 stop filter to it - and I'd like to be able to do that.


Anyone got a good idea about what to try next?
I've seen a Youtube demonstration of scoring the glass tapping it and removing it and then hacksawing the filter to weaken it and then removing it. This seems fraught with danger to the lens.

I can't be the first person this happened too. I am hoping somebody has a winning suggestion.
The filter is a Hoya so I assume it's aluminum (but not sure).
I was told if it was brass I might have had some chance.

Your in hope
Fergal
This is why i dont use uv filters if the glass would have broke your lens would have been damaged anyway,i hope you get it off :)

mog

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Re: Very Stuck Filter
« Reply #3 on: May 31, 2013, 07:41:38 AM »
Purchase a (motor vehicle) oil filter removal chain attachment for socket set.
machinemart.co.uk/images/library/product/huge/04/040210243.jpg
Clamp the socket handle and chain to a secure base.
Protect the lens body in some way (tape).
Very carefully wrap the chain around the protruding filter edge until tight.
Turn the lens!

More effective than rubber mats/lens wrench. Only possible if enough of filter edge remains to get a purchase.
Less scary than breaking filter glass and saw.

Spooky

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Re: Very Stuck Filter
« Reply #4 on: May 31, 2013, 07:53:49 AM »
Only a brief thought - if you are very careful! With the lens horizontal, or better, facing down, to avoid the swarf, try cutting two opposite slots on the filter edge along the lens axis, just wide enough to take something like a steel ruler and use the ruler to unscrew it (the hacksaw blade could be used but could snap!). Doing this carefully should not cause any more damage. You may need to cut several slots if there is any tight / distorted points. Just watch that you don't end up trying to turn the lens element retainer and damaging anything there.
It may be better to return to Canon who may be able to remove the end components whole... The drop may have distorted the 'roundness' and it could be impossible to unscrew, and if you did get the filter off, you may not get another one on!

Martin

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Re: Very Stuck Filter
« Reply #5 on: May 31, 2013, 08:49:31 AM »
.
Find your nearest shade tree mechanic, one who has a 16-pound sledge and have him hammer away until it breaks off.

Seriously, bite the bullet. Send it to Canon. Give them a few dollars to remove the filter and check if the lens really is okay.

In my experience, you'll be a lot more careful with lenses after taking a financial hit to service one that shouldn't have needed service to start with.
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paul13walnut5

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Re: Very Stuck Filter
« Reply #6 on: May 31, 2013, 08:53:52 AM »
I used the hacksaw method.

I would get that lens serviced, serviced and sold, or just plain ole sold.

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Re: Very Stuck Filter
« Reply #6 on: May 31, 2013, 08:53:52 AM »

noisejammer

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Re: Very Stuck Filter
« Reply #7 on: May 31, 2013, 09:30:42 AM »
It's not impossible but it does take a little effort. Here's how I did it while I was away in Africa - expect it to take 20-30 mins.

1. First check your lens very thoroughly. If it shows signs of some elements being decentered, the IS behaving strangely, zoom stiffness or focus issues, you should send it back to mummy. Also, if the filter is a B+W or another in which the glass is removed from the lens side, I recommend you send it to Canon...

If it's not a B+W filter (and you're feeling brave), you can proceed... If it is a B+W and you're still feeling brave, you can proceed too but you are going to break the filter glass which is hazardous for you and your lens.
 
2. First you need to remove the filter glass from the structure. If the filter is secured with a clip, you can pry the clip out and remove the glass. If it's secured using a threaded ring, get a lens wrench. These are available from a lot of places - I use this one http://www.ebay.com/itm/Spanner-Wrench-3-Tips-For-Camera-DSLR-DC-Lens-Repair-Repairing-Open-Tools-DC313-/190835498564 . This should let you unscrew the ring without damaging your lens.

3. It will help if you rig a vacuum cleaner to suck all the filings away as you work.
NB - I do not recommend a Dremel for this job.

Cover the objective with something to prevent it getting scratched - you could trim an EZ Off but be careful grit does not get under it. Next, try Spooky's suggestion cutting slots. This is best done with a needle file. You get one that is about a millimetre thick and 5 wide, with a square edge - something like the fourth file in this image http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/9f/NeedleFiles.jpg/200px-NeedleFiles.jpg .

If this works and you can unscrew the ring, great. If not, go to step 4...

4. Continue filing the slots until you are just about to break through the lower surface to the lens' filter mounting thread. This takes some patience but it can be done. Now make another slot about 1 cm away from one of the others. This needs to be just as deep. Again, you need to be really careful that you don't scratch the front surface of the objective or get crud into the mechanism.

5. Once part 4 is done, pick up a decent size pair of pliers and gently wiggle the thin section back and forth. This is where the filter glass would break - you need to get it all away from the lens and then install some protection. The idea is to fatigue the thin section that remains where you could not get to it with the file. Eventually, the filter ring will snap. Once it does, you can carefully lift out the filter ring.

6. Vacuum the entire lens, your self, your bench and tools before you attempt to blow the grit off. This minimises the amount of crud you will spread around with compressed air.

infared

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Re: Very Stuck Filter
« Reply #8 on: May 31, 2013, 09:36:12 AM »
Bornshooter... That was really a helpful reply for Hector? Thanks!!!

"This is why i dont use uv filters if the glass would have broke your lens would have been damaged anyway"

Hector...if you are not super handy and confident with tools...I think your best bet is to send the lens to Canon as some here have suggested.  Unfortunate situation...be then you can rest easy and they can check out the lens too just to make sure that it is operating properly.

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monikayip

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Re: Very Stuck Filter
« Reply #9 on: May 31, 2013, 09:55:47 AM »
I've used a bicycle inner tube combined with a wrench with some kind of teeth.  Worked really well for me.  Wrap the inner tube around the stuck filter, grab it with a wrench -- you may need to do this on both the filter and the lens to stabilize & increase your torque-- and turn.

mb66energy

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Re: Very Stuck Filter
« Reply #10 on: May 31, 2013, 10:26:05 AM »
Another method:

What is the material of the lens' filter thread? If it is plastic you might have a chance to cool down the METAL parts of the FILTER for 1 minute or so and you can try to remove it with your filter wrench. If the filter thread of the 70 200 mk ii is made of metal you can use the same procedure but you have to find out the timing when the filter thread is cool and the lens thread is warmer.

To cool down the filter thread I would suggest to cool down a thick sheet of aluminum (e.g. the base of a cooking pot) to -20 degree centigrade and keep the lens at 20 or 30 degree centigrade. To cool down the filter thread you put the lens with the filter thread onto the metal sheet and wait - let's say 60 seconds - before you try to remove it. Perhaps you have to repeat the procedure with different timings ...

This procedure is not too dangerous (as far as I see it, no guaranties!) for the lens  - if this doesn't work, I would send it to Canon - as a lot of contributors have said.
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Faaier

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Re: Very Stuck Filter
« Reply #11 on: May 31, 2013, 10:58:16 AM »
.
Seriously, bite the bullet. Send it to Canon. Give them a few dollars to remove the filter and check if the lens really is okay.

+1 - Chances are that the thread on your lens is damaged and needs replacing anyway, so why take the risk to remove it.

Unless you find heating/cooling and WD40 an option... you then could also drill in the outer rim with a Dremel and thread an aramid/glass yarn to pull it hard... but it wouldn't be my choice !

Hector1970

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Re: Very Stuck Filter
« Reply #12 on: May 31, 2013, 01:31:57 PM »
Thanks for all the kind replies. I'm in Ireland sending back to Canon isn't a straight forward option.
The lens is working perfectly (thank god). I might wait until the filter gets further  damaged and hack saw it off when there is no choice.
I found a reply from a similar query written by Mt Spokane . He used a thing that pushed back the dent ( I can't remember the actual name. It was like a filter repair tool. It was on the Microtools site. It was unavailable in Europe and out of stock in the US.

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Re: Very Stuck Filter
« Reply #12 on: May 31, 2013, 01:31:57 PM »

Jim Saunders

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Re: Very Stuck Filter
« Reply #13 on: May 31, 2013, 06:12:09 PM »
I got one off by nudging the bent corner of the filter ring back into shape with some pliers, then using filter wrenches.  If yours isn't that obviously out of round though then I'd ship it back.

Jim
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Re: Very Stuck Filter
« Reply #14 on: May 31, 2013, 08:02:14 PM »
Hector, search for strap wrench on Amazon.  You can get a tool that will remove the filter.  Those simple filter wrenches are for slightly stuck filters, you need a better tool.
 
Something like this one:
 
http://www.amazon.com/Klein-S-6H-Grip-It--5-Inch-Capacity/dp/B0000DIN9P/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1370044814&sr=8-9&keywords=strap+wrench
 

 
 

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Re: Very Stuck Filter
« Reply #14 on: May 31, 2013, 08:02:14 PM »