September 30, 2014, 07:08:44 PM

Author Topic: Very Stuck Filter  (Read 6311 times)

noisejammer

  • EOS M2
  • ****
  • Posts: 160
    • View Profile
Re: Very Stuck Filter
« Reply #15 on: May 31, 2013, 08:52:44 PM »
I had a better idea for protecting the front element - give it a couple of layers of gaffer tape. Any residual gunge will be far easier to remove than a scratch.

On the idea of a strap wrench - you might find one at a car parts place (They are often used to remove oil filters.) I have one that has a 10mm strap but you could try placing an elastic band on the filter so that the strap doesn't grip the lens body at the same time.

I once saw a very skilled toolmaker "hammer a ring into round." The guy quite literally did this with a lens in the middle... and did no damage.

I cringed.

canon rumors FORUM

Re: Very Stuck Filter
« Reply #15 on: May 31, 2013, 08:52:44 PM »

SirPhil

  • SX50 HS
  • **
  • Posts: 6
    • View Profile
Re: Very Stuck Filter
« Reply #16 on: May 31, 2013, 09:40:37 PM »
I've had success in freeing several friend's stuck filters (either due to dropping...or just stuck) by putting the lens in the freezer for a few minutes and then using the bottom of a Chaco (sandal) pressed firmly against the front to twist them off.  No damage is done to the lens.  And don't worry... a few minutes in the freezer won't cause any problems with the internals of your lens since... they're often spec'ed to work in below freezing conditions for much lengthier amounts of time.


Phil ;) :D
5D MKII, 5D Classic
EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS USM MKII; EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM; EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM;  EF 20-35mm f/2.8L

paul13walnut5

  • Guest
Re: Very Stuck Filter
« Reply #17 on: June 01, 2013, 04:09:37 PM »
+1

Removing the filter will simply remove the filter.

It won't fix whatever else has went wrong unseen inside.

Don Haines

  • Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS II
  • *******
  • Posts: 3241
  • Posting cat pictures on the internet since 1986
    • View Profile
Re: Very Stuck Filter
« Reply #18 on: June 03, 2013, 10:13:16 AM »
I really don't see how you can bend the filter to the point where it is REALLY stuck, without having bent/damaged the end of the lens. I would be sending the lens/filter back to Canon with a note explaining what happened... and I would expect that you will be paying for a new outer lens housing and recalibration of the lens.
The best camera is the one in your hands

bornshooter

  • 5D Mark III
  • ******
  • Posts: 703
  • Love L series glass
    • View Profile
    • my flickr
Re: Very Stuck Filter
« Reply #19 on: June 03, 2013, 11:45:33 AM »
Bornshooter... That was really a helpful reply for Hector? Thanks!!!

"This is why i dont use uv filters if the glass would have broke your lens would have been damaged anyway"

Hector...if you are not super handy and confident with tools...I think your best bet is to send the lens to Canon as some here have suggested.  Unfortunate situation...be then you can rest easy and they can check out the lens too just to make sure that it is operating properly.
i do apologise buy a filter removal tool hector.

jcollett

  • Rebel SL1
  • ***
  • Posts: 98
    • View Profile
Re: Very Stuck Filter
« Reply #20 on: June 03, 2013, 11:51:09 AM »
I'd be careful using a tool with a lever action as you may damage lens components accidentally since you can apply so much force.  Not sure if anyone mentioned these, but they are cheap and really help to remove metal rings and have been used in kitchens for decades.  Here is one example...

http://www.amazon.com/Fox-Run-Rubber-Jar-Opener/dp/B000GG9UP4

I got a round one as a promo item and it really helps to securely attach and remove filters.  It is nice to have and cheap, so get one if you do not already have one.

dgatwood

  • 5D Mark III
  • ******
  • Posts: 726
  • 300D, 400D, 6D
    • View Profile
Re: Very Stuck Filter
« Reply #21 on: June 03, 2013, 02:40:46 PM »
.
Seriously, bite the bullet. Send it to Canon. Give them a few dollars to remove the filter and check if the lens really is okay.

+1 - Chances are that the thread on your lens is damaged and needs replacing anyway, so why take the risk to remove it.

This.  If my memory is correct, on most lenses, you can remove the filter ring by itself independently of the glass.  If that's the case with your lens, I would remove it, throw it away, and buy a replacement filter ring.

The bigger reason for doing it this way is the concern that the bent filter ring might have resulted in the filter itself touching the glass of your lens, in which case removing the filter by unscrewing it might destroy your objective lens.  Better to remove the filter ring with the screws so you can slide the filter and the threaded ring straight out as a pair.  Then after the filter thread is no longer attached to your lens, you can try to separate them as much as you want, and if you fail, you can always order the part and replace it.
« Last Edit: June 03, 2013, 02:46:45 PM by dgatwood »

canon rumors FORUM

Re: Very Stuck Filter
« Reply #21 on: June 03, 2013, 02:40:46 PM »

Marsu42

  • Canon EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II
  • *******
  • Posts: 4666
  • ML-66d / 100L / 70-300L / 17-40L / 600rts
    • View Profile
    • 6D positive spec list
Re: Very Stuck Filter
« Reply #22 on: June 03, 2013, 03:06:41 PM »
I really don't see how you can bend the filter to the point where it is REALLY stuck, without having bent/damaged the end of the lens.

I know it's possible because it happened to me, though with a much cheaper lens - the filter acts like a bumper in front of a car and can take all damage if you're lucky.

I also know that it can be (nearly) impossible to remove the bent filter w/o specialized tools, I tried everything but failed, as a last resort I simply removed all broken filter glass, the filter thread is still on the lens...

noisejammer

  • EOS M2
  • ****
  • Posts: 160
    • View Profile
Re: Very Stuck Filter
« Reply #23 on: June 06, 2013, 02:18:11 PM »
I know it's possible because it happened to me, though with a much cheaper lens - the filter acts like a bumper in front of a car and can take all damage if you're lucky.

I also know that it can be (nearly) impossible to remove the bent filter w/o specialized tools, I tried everything but failed, as a last resort I simply removed all broken filter glass, the filter thread is still on the lens...
I've been shooting for nearly forty years and have dropped two lenses. In both cases, the filter glass was destroyed and the filter mount was bent over but the lens thread was not visibly damaged. I looked for scratching of the lens but did not see any. That said, my heart was in my mouth.

I was able to remove the filters in both cases without special tools (apart from the needle file and pliers I referred to in my previous post.) It can be done but it does take considerable care and patience.

On the use of filters - many people put them on when they anticipate being exposed to moisture (salt, snow, rain), blown sand or dust. My approach has been the opposite - I will remove the filter when the lens' front surface is being directly illuminated and they will materially degrade a shot.

Mt Spokane Photography

  • Canon EF 600mm f/4L IS II
  • ********
  • Posts: 8747
    • View Profile
Re: Very Stuck Filter
« Reply #24 on: June 06, 2013, 03:36:00 PM »
I'd be careful using a tool with a lever action as you may damage lens components accidentally since you can apply so much force.  Not sure if anyone mentioned these, but they are cheap and really help to remove metal rings and have been used in kitchens for decades.  Here is one example...

http://www.amazon.com/Fox-Run-Rubber-Jar-Opener/dp/B000GG9UP4

I got a round one as a promo item and it really helps to securely attach and remove filters.  It is nice to have and cheap, so get one if you do not already have one.

I' buy and sell used cameras and lenses.  Occasionally, I get one that has been dropped and bent so badly that it takes a lever type wrench to remove it.  Its still a flexible plastic strap, and its applied to the filter only.  Obviously, applying too much torque can potentially damage the lens, so common sense is needed.  If the glass is gone from the filter, its easy, I just pinch the edge of the filter with needle nose pliers and bend it with a twisting action, wrapping it around the nose of the plier and it pops right out.
I do agree with those who recommend sending a lens that has been dropped to be serviced.  There are too many internal things that can happen that do affect IQ but might not be obvious.

paul13walnut5

  • Guest
Re: Very Stuck Filter
« Reply #25 on: June 06, 2013, 06:07:44 PM »
I bought a used copy of the Sigma 18-50, it arrived -unusually- with a filter in place (I remember this from my photo retail days, staff got to keep the decent quality used filters off of lenses we bought in, so we could get the mark up on the crappy filters we sold)  I had to use the hacksaw method to get the filter free (I should have in actual fact rejected the lens, as time would tell)

About 8 months in the well performing but sloppy feeling lens broke.  Not dropped, no impact, just the zoom barrel slid out of it's helix and would not pop back in.  Right in the middle of a video shoot with no back up.

My used bargain lens required an £80 repair, to be fair it arrived with a new barrel and was exceptionally well calibrated (focus faster, sharper corners)

I know from experience that a dropped lens can appear fine but have a problem unseen that will manifest itself at the worst possible moment.

canon rumors FORUM

Re: Very Stuck Filter
« Reply #25 on: June 06, 2013, 06:07:44 PM »