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Author Topic: Flash Newbie: Flash Photography Concept  (Read 4368 times)

emag

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Re: Flash Newbie: Flash Photography Concept
« Reply #15 on: June 17, 2013, 10:16:39 PM »
Among other sources, a good one for learning flash technique is    http://strobist(dot)blogspot(dot)com/

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Re: Flash Newbie: Flash Photography Concept
« Reply #15 on: June 17, 2013, 10:16:39 PM »

RLPhoto

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Re: Flash Newbie: Flash Photography Concept
« Reply #16 on: June 17, 2013, 10:23:28 PM »
Pretty much when you dive into the rabbit hole of flash, you'll always be setting your camera in manual.

eninja

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Re: Flash Newbie: Flash Photography Concept
« Reply #17 on: June 18, 2013, 12:57:05 AM »
Thanks for all the inputs.
In my context of Av mode, i refer to the feature of minimum shutter speed, and being able to use iso range automatically.
if i have 85mm lens, there's no way i can limit my shutter speed to faster than 1/90. Also iso is fixed, i dont have the luxury to preserve my iso settings. Thus i said Av is not advisable.

On sunny location, maybe i can make work around such that when it get dark, shutter speed will be above 1/90.
if this dont work,
I guess i will use manual.

I want the book. but i want it in PDF. If not, later on, i will surely buy this book.
in the mean time, i will play with my settings.

And yes, upon using manual using flash, i tend to use manual unconciously all the time.

Which is goid, because, u learn to tell the settings, just by being in the location.

eninja

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Re: Flash Newbie: Flash Photography Concept
« Reply #18 on: June 18, 2013, 01:08:31 AM »
Basically, what is the standard good practice when using a flash?
is it:

1. switch off the flash
2. take desired ambient light exposure (determine min shutter speed desired as well as iso n aperture.
3. switch on flash
4. take picture
5. adjust as desired

Can share us your standard practice or tips?

in my first post, i was actually asking for step 1 n 2, automatic way.

pensive tomato

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Re: Flash Newbie: Flash Photography Concept
« Reply #19 on: June 18, 2013, 08:45:12 AM »
Basically, what is the standard good practice when using a flash?
is it:

1. switch off the flash
2. take desired ambient light exposure (determine min shutter speed desired as well as iso n aperture.
3. switch on flash
4. take picture
5. adjust as desired

Can share us your standard practice or tips?

in my first post, i was actually asking for step 1 n 2, automatic way.

I started playing with flash myself not that long ago and quickly found out what many others have said, flash photography is its own world. If you're really starting, why not take a step back and try some basics? Perhaps do some test shots with a static subject in a room with existing light:

1. Mount your camera on a tripod with the flash on top. Place your subject nearby.
2. Set your camera to manual, try some middle of the road settings: f/8, 1/200 s (your camera will make 1/180 s automatically as this is the camera x-sync speed), and perhaps ISO 200 or 400.
3. Take some shots adjusting the intensity of your main light by using FEC.
4. Then work on your ambient light by adjusting your shutter speed and ISO if you want to keep your DoF constant.
5. Of course the direction of light from the flash may need to be improved, so you can always use a TTL cable, get your flash off camera and play around.
6. This will work the same outdoors, although HSS may come into place, and of course the direction and quality of ambient light can offer other creative possibilities and challenges.

Now disregard this post if you've already mastered the fundamentals and you're comfortable reading the existing light and adding new light sources.

+1 on the Speedliter's Handbook and the Strobist blog.
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emag

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Re: Flash Newbie: Flash Photography Concept
« Reply #20 on: June 18, 2013, 10:19:16 AM »
Seriously.....

Your camera is not stuck in Av mode, you are (I mean that in a friendly way  :D  Trying to stay with Av while using flash is like using cruise control on the race track, it's too limiting even though it is useful in some situations)  Manual mode is your friend.

1.  Go to the strobist blog  (it's free)

2.  Start with Lighting 101 Archive, get a feel for the basics, then bounce around and read up on some of the more advanced techniques to whet your appetite

3.  Smile as you discover the answers to many of your questions and begin to take your flash photography to the next level

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Re: Flash Newbie: Flash Photography Concept
« Reply #21 on: June 19, 2013, 01:31:38 AM »
+1 to the strobist blog.  You'll learn a lot from it, even go full manual on your flash setup.  I use TTL most of the time when flash is on-camera but if I want to be extra creative, I use full manual off-camera.  You can control the shadows and where would you want to put your light or how strong you want your flash this way.  Just refer to the pics you'll find in the blog to know what I mean.

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Re: Flash Newbie: Flash Photography Concept
« Reply #21 on: June 19, 2013, 01:31:38 AM »

cayenne

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Re: Flash Newbie: Flash Photography Concept
« Reply #22 on: June 19, 2013, 10:39:37 AM »
+1 to the strobist blog.  You'll learn a lot from it, even go full manual on your flash setup.  I use TTL most of the time when flash is on-camera but if I want to be extra creative, I use full manual off-camera.  You can control the shadows and where would you want to put your light or how strong you want your flash this way.  Just refer to the pics you'll find in the blog to know what I mean.

One of the best pieces of advice I've heard so far, with regard to TTL/ETTL...is from Syl Arena. He says he only uses ETTL, when the camera lens are subject are generally moving and changing distances from each other. Which kind of makes sense. 

If run and gun, it helps..but if you're taking time to set up shots, there's not much need for it...manual is the way to go.

C

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Re: Flash Newbie: Flash Photography Concept
« Reply #23 on: June 19, 2013, 11:26:19 PM »
+1 to the strobist blog.  You'll learn a lot from it, even go full manual on your flash setup.  I use TTL most of the time when flash is on-camera but if I want to be extra creative, I use full manual off-camera.  You can control the shadows and where would you want to put your light or how strong you want your flash this way.  Just refer to the pics you'll find in the blog to know what I mean.

One of the best pieces of advice I've heard so far, with regard to TTL/ETTL...is from Syl Arena. He says he only uses ETTL, when the camera lens are subject are generally moving and changing distances from each other. Which kind of makes sense. 

If run and gun, it helps..but if you're taking time to set up shots, there's not much need for it...manual is the way to go.

C

I gave the same advice about using ettl for dynamic lighting situations and where subject to light source distance keeps changing on a similar post and I got shot down in flames!

Yes it's useful but there are limitations and knowing how and when to use it is important. So is knowing how and when to use manual flash.

Syl's first book - speedlighter's handbook - explains these differences clearly. I also recommend his second and recent installment, though it repeats a lot of the same concepts.

For me, understanding how light behaves and how the camera meters light really helped. Then you start to wonder about power levels. In ettl mode you have no real clue what the power output is going to be. The flash could be firing at full power and you'd have no way to tell. This is where manual starts to become useful. You have more control and you learn about flash quicker and before you know it you'll be able to kinda guess how much power is needed.
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eninja

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Re: Flash Newbie: Flash Photography Concept
« Reply #24 on: June 19, 2013, 11:38:24 PM »
Thank you for the all the info, keep it coming, if it is regarding best practices for beginner.

Now I have these infos at the back of my head, it is time to apply and play with it.


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Re: Flash Newbie: Flash Photography Concept
« Reply #24 on: June 19, 2013, 11:38:24 PM »