August 28, 2014, 11:52:35 PM

Author Topic: Decaying Nature close up...  (Read 4343 times)

Sporgon

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Re: Decaying Nature close up...
« Reply #15 on: August 28, 2013, 07:18:31 AM »
I can see what you have been aiming to do in these pictures. I wouldn't have any issues with the composition. The problem is the light. You've taken these in really flat light with no modeling, and it shows in the end result. Pitty 'cos they have potential.

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Re: Decaying Nature close up...
« Reply #15 on: August 28, 2013, 07:18:31 AM »

Famateur

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Re: Decaying Nature close up...
« Reply #16 on: August 28, 2013, 05:57:13 PM »
@Ivan: As a first pass, I tend to agree with others that the images were kinda "blah", like I was looking for the punchline. Then, as I got to looking at the detail of them, it reminded me of times I've been in the deep woods hunting elk and notice things that later in photos just don't look that interesting but still capture the memory. It makes sense that these pictures for you are more documentary and less about images with a "wow" factor. I appreciate that from my own experience.

For example, in the first image, I notice the new life growing up through the dead wood. This image captures the memory (if that's what caught your eye). The second image shows an interesting repeating pattern that would be uncommon and something to catch the eye and want to remember. The last image I actually like aesthetically because it shows a brilliant contrast between the gray, weathered exterior and the rich rust/brown interior of the decaying log. Cool.

Astute point about often benefiting more from advice about a "bad" photo than from praise of a "good" photo. I might just learn more by posting some of my "bad" photos...

@VerySimpleJason: Great idea! What an excellent way to take otherwise ordinary (looking) photos and create art. Maybe I can resurrect some of my own "blah" snapshots. :)

@Sporgon: Brilliant observation. I'll bet in less flat light that these same images would have more impact (although I understand that "impact" is not the OP's intention). Add some depth with more angular light, and these photos would probably shed most of the "blah" initial impression.

@anybody: This thread made me think about interest and closeness. I often hear people say, "If your photos aren't interesting, get closer." (If someone famous said that, forgive my ignorance of the source. :) ) It occurs to me that what makes this true so often (and maybe the primary draw into the world of close-ups and macro photography) is that we walk around every day with most everything at arm's or leg's length (or further). Go in close, and ordinary, everyday things suddenly become interesting. Why? For me, it's because I see things (textures, shapes, colors) that I may have had no idea were even there.

Anyway, fun stuff...and interesting thread (at least to me).

Ivan Muller

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Re: Decaying Nature close up...
« Reply #17 on: August 29, 2013, 02:39:40 AM »
@Ivan: As a first pass, I tend to agree with others that the images were kinda "blah", like I was looking for the punchline. Then, as I got to looking at the detail of them, it reminded me of times I've been in the deep woods hunting elk and notice things that later in photos just don't look that interesting but still capture the memory. It makes sense that these pictures for you are more documentary and less about images with a "wow" factor. I appreciate that from my own experience.

For example, in the first image, I notice the new life growing up through the dead wood. This image captures the memory (if that's what caught your eye). The second image shows an interesting repeating pattern that would be uncommon and something to catch the eye and want to remember. The last image I actually like aesthetically because it shows a brilliant contrast between the gray, weathered exterior and the rich rust/brown interior of the decaying log. Cool.

Astute point about often benefiting more from advice about a "bad" photo than from praise of a "good" photo. I might just learn more by posting some of my "bad" photos...

@VerySimpleJason: Great idea! What an excellent way to take otherwise ordinary (looking) photos and create art. Maybe I can resurrect some of my own "blah" snapshots. :)

@Sporgon: Brilliant observation. I'll bet in less flat light that these same images would have more impact (although I understand that "impact" is not the OP's intention). Add some depth with more angular light, and these photos would probably shed most of the "blah" initial impression.

@anybody: This thread made me think about interest and closeness. I often hear people say, "If your photos aren't interesting, get closer." (If someone famous said that, forgive my ignorance of the source. :) ) It occurs to me that what makes this true so often (and maybe the primary draw into the world of close-ups and macro photography) is that we walk around every day with most everything at arm's or leg's length (or further). Go in close, and ordinary, everyday things suddenly become interesting. Why? For me, it's because I see things (textures, shapes, colors) that I may have had no idea were even there.

Anyway, fun stuff...and interesting thread (at least to me).

thanks! you have said it very well. Sometimes the 'wow' photos tire quickly and the softer photos outlast them..think of a portrait of a kid or anyone with a huge grin on their face..as a personal image of family or  friends it will work and of course never become tiresome...but for the rest of us that don't know the person  the photographs where the smile is more gentle or just a straight level gaze are the ones with staying power, the ones that grow on you...and if well done where the character is revealed...

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Re: Decaying Nature close up...
« Reply #17 on: August 29, 2013, 02:39:40 AM »