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Author Topic: The Lumia 1020...final death blow to the Point and Shoot?  (Read 33656 times)

RLPhoto

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Re: The Lumia 1020...final death blow to the Point and Shoot?
« Reply #30 on: July 17, 2013, 11:13:12 AM »
I have to concur that Win-8 sucks big time on a desktop. Metro has no business on a PC machine...

but on a tablet device or a phone, Its far better than my Iphone. The only reason I haven't jumped ship is that the more and more stuff you buy on itunes and the app store, the more it ties you down on the system.  :P I couldn't switch if I wanted too with all my purchases.

canon rumors FORUM

Re: The Lumia 1020...final death blow to the Point and Shoot?
« Reply #30 on: July 17, 2013, 11:13:12 AM »

Mt Spokane Photography

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Re: The Lumia 1020...final death blow to the Point and Shoot?
« Reply #31 on: July 17, 2013, 11:44:48 AM »
I guess I'd like to keep things separated while batteries have just enough juice for one day on those huge screen phones. I'd rather shoot as much as I like, use the flash as much as I like, without having to think if I can get through the day. (These things change rather quickly, though.)

I make pretty heavy use of my Lumia each day, and it gets at least 9 hours of battery life. It doesn't have a Xenon flash, but it does have an exceptionally bright duel LED flash (very high MCD). I'm not sure that the screen is really the primary power draw anyway...the bigger draw is usually the LTE and WiFi, both of which I keep on at all times now since AT&T went the way of Verizon, and is now capping bandwidth at 5Gb/mo (I browse enough high def photography and videos on my phone that I can burn through that).

One of the things I like about Windows Phone 8 is that it is actually quite efficient, and when the battery drops below a certain threshold, you can configure it to enter a low-power mode where it will only turn on the LTE or WiFi if you actually need to use it. That usually extends my battery another three hours, so I can usually get 12 hours a day out of my 920.

Although I'm not a smart phone user, I bought my son a smartphone for his birthday last weekend.  He and I looked at the Samsung, Nokia, Motorola and Apple phones and the Nokia windows phones were very good, the display was excellent. 
 
I ended up buying him a used iphone for a couple of reasons.
1.  I did not want to be tied to a contract.
2.  He has been using a ipod for several years and has a big investment in music, which would be difficult to transfer to a different device.
 
If not for that, the Samsung Galaxy S4 and the Nokia phones are at the top of the class.
 
Although the average phone buyer does not place the camera at the top of his list of priorities, buyers are certainly aware of the camera capability, and those who are photographers are even more particular.
 
I went to my aunts 90th birthday and took the iphone along to try it out.  Although under the indoor conditions,  it certainly could not compete with a DSLR, or even a good point and shoot, it did a passable job in the situation, the main issue being the low shutter speed which caused a slight blur.
 
 

bchernicoff

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Re: The Lumia 1020...final death blow to the Point and Shoot?
« Reply #32 on: July 17, 2013, 02:30:25 PM »
I thought this was a good read on the camera module: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/07/15/nokia_lumia_1020_technical_walkthrough/

jrista

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Re: The Lumia 1020...final death blow to the Point and Shoot?
« Reply #33 on: July 17, 2013, 03:23:58 PM »
I have to concur that Win-8 sucks big time on a desktop. Metro has no business on a PC machine...

but on a tablet device or a phone, Its far better than my Iphone. The only reason I haven't jumped ship is that the more and more stuff you buy on itunes and the app store, the more it ties you down on the system.  :P I couldn't switch if I wanted too with all my purchases.

It did, I agree. I think Windows 8.1 fixes most of that, though. It still isn't ideal, but a hell of a lot better than what it was. That's Microsoft's MO, though. It always takes a couple versions for quirks to iron out. Also, keep in mind, people utterly HATED Windows XP when it first hit (I remember reading scathing, hateful articles months and months after its initial release), and it was over a year before it became the most used and most loved Windows OS ever. I don't suspect things will be any different for Windows 8...and it is a hell of a lot better release than Windows Vista was (so the next major release should be a pretty significant improvement even over Win8.1).

Microsoft has a different release MO. Apple builds up an unquenchable fervor by not releasing ANY details about its releases until the day they unveil. (Well, they did....seems that may change under Cook, and I guess we'll see whether that is to the detriment of apple in the long term.) Microsoft has always approached releases with lots of software leaks, beta versions, community technology previews, etc. I think that can be good and bad, but these days, it seems it gives people too much time to play with new products before they are even released, encounter all the pre-release bugs, and decide they don't like the product. I would prefer Microsoft take the old Apple/Jobs approach. Don't release anything until its done, and when its released, make sure its solid, and make it a big party. They wouldn't lose people in the beta and CTP phase that way, they wouldn't get a bunch of pre-release bad press, and they would gain the benefit of people being antsy and excited to see and use the next greatest Microsoft thing. People just end up bored with the bugs before new Windows versions are actually released, the excitement is gone, so the release suffers, and it takes longer to build momentum.

Maybe the MS reorg will change things...but I don't really trust Ballmer to be anything other than a raging tool...so....

distant.star

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Re: The Lumia 1020...final death blow to the Point and Shoot?
« Reply #34 on: July 17, 2013, 03:28:47 PM »
If I recall correctly, at least in the US...the sound was MANDATED by law, to foil upskirt photographers that were taking pics of chicks walking around in skirts without them knowing.

Apparently enough of a ruckus was raised and it was mandated that cameras on phones make a sound when they were activated.

C

That can't possibly be law/regulation. I have a Canon Powershot A1200 that has a fully silent shutter mode. No noise whatsoever. Canon would not sell a product that did not comply with law.
You're offended? Oh, really! Life IS offense -- get used to it.

RLPhoto

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Re: The Lumia 1020...final death blow to the Point and Shoot?
« Reply #35 on: July 17, 2013, 03:30:31 PM »
I have to concur that Win-8 sucks big time on a desktop. Metro has no business on a PC machine...

but on a tablet device or a phone, Its far better than my Iphone. The only reason I haven't jumped ship is that the more and more stuff you buy on itunes and the app store, the more it ties you down on the system.  :P I couldn't switch if I wanted too with all my purchases.

It did, I agree. I think Windows 8.1 fixes most of that, though. It still isn't ideal, but a hell of a lot better than what it was. That's Microsoft's MO, though. It always takes a couple versions for quirks to iron out. Also, keep in mind, people utterly HATED Windows XP when it first hit (I remember reading scathing, hateful articles months and months after its initial release), and it was over a year before it became the most used and most loved Windows OS ever. I don't suspect things will be any different for Windows 8...and it is a hell of a lot better release than Windows Vista was (so the next major release should be a pretty significant improvement even over Win8.1).

Microsoft has a different release MO. Apple builds up an unquenchable fervor by not releasing ANY details about its releases until the day they unveil. (Well, they did....seems that may change under Cook, and I guess we'll see whether that is to the detriment of apple in the long term.) Microsoft has always approached releases with lots of software leaks, beta versions, community technology previews, etc. I think that can be good and bad, but these days, it seems it gives people too much time to play with new products before they are even released, encounter all the pre-release bugs, and decide they don't like the product. I would prefer Microsoft take the old Apple/Jobs approach. Don't release anything until its done, and when its released, make sure its solid, and make it a big party. They wouldn't lose people in the beta and CTP phase that way, they wouldn't get a bunch of pre-release bad press, and they would gain the benefit of people being antsy and excited to see and use the next greatest Microsoft thing. People just end up bored with the bugs before new Windows versions are actually released, the excitement is gone, so the release suffers, and it takes longer to build momentum.

Maybe the MS reorg will change things...but I don't really trust Ballmer to be anything other than a raging tool...so....

Windows 2000/NT - Good

Windows ME - Bad

Windows XP - Good

Windows Vista - Bad

Windows 7 - Good

Windows 8 - Bad

Windows 9 - ? Fill the blank.

I love M$ products but not when they revamp something the first time. The second attempt is usually perfect.

jrista

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Re: The Lumia 1020...final death blow to the Point and Shoot?
« Reply #36 on: July 17, 2013, 03:41:23 PM »
I have to concur that Win-8 sucks big time on a desktop. Metro has no business on a PC machine...

but on a tablet device or a phone, Its far better than my Iphone. The only reason I haven't jumped ship is that the more and more stuff you buy on itunes and the app store, the more it ties you down on the system.  :P I couldn't switch if I wanted too with all my purchases.

It did, I agree. I think Windows 8.1 fixes most of that, though. It still isn't ideal, but a hell of a lot better than what it was. That's Microsoft's MO, though. It always takes a couple versions for quirks to iron out. Also, keep in mind, people utterly HATED Windows XP when it first hit (I remember reading scathing, hateful articles months and months after its initial release), and it was over a year before it became the most used and most loved Windows OS ever. I don't suspect things will be any different for Windows 8...and it is a hell of a lot better release than Windows Vista was (so the next major release should be a pretty significant improvement even over Win8.1).

Microsoft has a different release MO. Apple builds up an unquenchable fervor by not releasing ANY details about its releases until the day they unveil. (Well, they did....seems that may change under Cook, and I guess we'll see whether that is to the detriment of apple in the long term.) Microsoft has always approached releases with lots of software leaks, beta versions, community technology previews, etc. I think that can be good and bad, but these days, it seems it gives people too much time to play with new products before they are even released, encounter all the pre-release bugs, and decide they don't like the product. I would prefer Microsoft take the old Apple/Jobs approach. Don't release anything until its done, and when its released, make sure its solid, and make it a big party. They wouldn't lose people in the beta and CTP phase that way, they wouldn't get a bunch of pre-release bad press, and they would gain the benefit of people being antsy and excited to see and use the next greatest Microsoft thing. People just end up bored with the bugs before new Windows versions are actually released, the excitement is gone, so the release suffers, and it takes longer to build momentum.

Maybe the MS reorg will change things...but I don't really trust Ballmer to be anything other than a raging tool...so....

Windows 2000/NT - Good

Windows ME - Bad

Windows XP - Good

Windows Vista - Bad

Windows 7 - Good

Windows 8 - Bad

Windows 9 - ? Fill the blank.

I love M$ products but not when they revamp something the first time. The second attempt is usually perfect.

Yup, that's pretty much it! :D It would be nice if it became:

Windows 9: Good
Windows 10: Good
   .
   .
   .
Windows N: Good

I get the feeling it will probably be more along the lines of :

Windows 8: So-So
Windows 8.1: Better
Windows 8.2: Even Better
Windows 8.5: Good
Windows 9: Better than Good
Windows 9.1: Even Better than Good

And if there are six to eight months between each release, then reaching Even Better than Good could take years. Assuming they don't end up continuing to flipflop.

canon rumors FORUM

Re: The Lumia 1020...final death blow to the Point and Shoot?
« Reply #36 on: July 17, 2013, 03:41:23 PM »

cayenne

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Re: The Lumia 1020...final death blow to the Point and Shoot?
« Reply #37 on: July 17, 2013, 03:53:37 PM »
If I recall correctly, at least in the US...the sound was MANDATED by law, to foil upskirt photographers that were taking pics of chicks walking around in skirts without them knowing.

Apparently enough of a ruckus was raised and it was mandated that cameras on phones make a sound when they were activated.

C

That can't possibly be law/regulation. I have a Canon Powershot A1200 that has a fully silent shutter mode. No noise whatsoever. Canon would not sell a product that did not comply with law.

I was only talking towards camera phones...

cayenne

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Re: The Lumia 1020...final death blow to the Point and Shoot?
« Reply #38 on: July 17, 2013, 03:58:40 PM »
I have to concur that Win-8 sucks big time on a desktop. Metro has no business on a PC machine...

but on a tablet device or a phone, Its far better than my Iphone. The only reason I haven't jumped ship is that the more and more stuff you buy on itunes and the app store, the more it ties you down on the system.  :P I couldn't switch if I wanted too with all my purchases.

It did, I agree. I think Windows 8.1 fixes most of that, though. It still isn't ideal, but a hell of a lot better than what it was. That's Microsoft's MO, though. It always takes a couple versions for quirks to iron out. Also, keep in mind, people utterly HATED Windows XP when it first hit (I remember reading scathing, hateful articles months and months after its initial release), and it was over a year before it became the most used and most loved Windows OS ever. I don't suspect things will be any different for Windows 8...and it is a hell of a lot better release than Windows Vista was (so the next major release should be a pretty significant improvement even over Win8.1).

Microsoft has a different release MO. Apple builds up an unquenchable fervor by not releasing ANY details about its releases until the day they unveil. (Well, they did....seems that may change under Cook, and I guess we'll see whether that is to the detriment of apple in the long term.) Microsoft has always approached releases with lots of software leaks, beta versions, community technology previews, etc. I think that can be good and bad, but these days, it seems it gives people too much time to play with new products before they are even released, encounter all the pre-release bugs, and decide they don't like the product. I would prefer Microsoft take the old Apple/Jobs approach. Don't release anything until its done, and when its released, make sure its solid, and make it a big party. They wouldn't lose people in the beta and CTP phase that way, they wouldn't get a bunch of pre-release bad press, and they would gain the benefit of people being antsy and excited to see and use the next greatest Microsoft thing. People just end up bored with the bugs before new Windows versions are actually released, the excitement is gone, so the release suffers, and it takes longer to build momentum.

Maybe the MS reorg will change things...but I don't really trust Ballmer to be anything other than a raging tool...so....

Windows 2000/NT - Good

Windows ME - Bad

Windows XP - Good

Windows Vista - Bad

Windows 7 - Good

Windows 8 - Bad

Windows 9 - ? Fill the blank.

I love M$ products but not when they revamp something the first time. The second attempt is usually perfect.

Yup, that's pretty much it! :D It would be nice if it became:

Windows 9: Good
Windows 10: Good
   .
   .
   .
Windows N: Good

I get the feeling it will probably be more along the lines of :

Windows 8: So-So
Windows 8.1: Better
Windows 8.2: Even Better
Windows 8.5: Good
Windows 9: Better than Good
Windows 9.1: Even Better than Good

And if there are six to eight months between each release, then reaching Even Better than Good could take years. Assuming they don't end up continuing to flipflop.

I think windows 8.x would be likely received MUCH better, if they would give the user the choice, especially with respect to a real computer (laptop/tower) to completely divorce the Metro UI from the system and allow you to go fully and ONLY into a classic desktop only paradigm.

I think that's largely the main gripe about it, trying to use a tablet UI on a desktop (even if it had touch, not many want to keep their arms up off the desk a lot, constantly touching the screen)....

I hear Win8 is pretty snappy and does good things with memory management, but if they don't allow classic computer users to turn Metro OFF, I think they're gonna lose business. People are NOT in a rush to migrate off Win7, businesses certainly aren't going to migrate, heck, they're just now coming off XP still in many cases.

I mean, look at Apple...they don't have the same OS on the tablet/phone that they have on the computer...iOS vs OSX...different beasts. Sure, they are converging to some extent, but not to the same extent MS tried with Win8.

My $0.02,

cayenne

RLPhoto

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Re: The Lumia 1020...final death blow to the Point and Shoot?
« Reply #39 on: July 17, 2013, 04:05:40 PM »
^-------- My gripe with apple is this. In 2006, Ditched all my Apple computers for my first PC build thats still doing work for me today.

Buy a new Idevice, It needs a new itunes.
New Itunes needs a new OSX.
New OSX requires a New Machine.
Old Programs will not run on new OSX.
Buy new programs for the new OSX.
Rinse and Repeat every 24 months.

OSX - Windows - Linux.  Pick your poison.

:|

Mt Spokane Photography

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Re: The Lumia 1020...final death blow to the Point and Shoot?
« Reply #40 on: July 17, 2013, 04:06:19 PM »


I think windows 8.x would be likely received MUCH better, if they would give the user the choice, especially with respect to a real computer (laptop/tower) to completely divorce the Metro UI from the system and allow you to go fully and ONLY into a classic desktop only paradigm.

I think that's largely the main gripe about it, trying to use a tablet UI on a desktop (even if it had touch, not many want to keep their arms up off the desk a lot, constantly touching the screen)....

I hear Win8 is pretty snappy and does good things with memory management, but if they don't allow classic computer users to turn Metro OFF, I think they're gonna lose business. People are NOT in a rush to migrate off Win7, businesses certainly aren't going to migrate, heck, they're just now coming off XP still in many cases.

I mean, look at Apple...they don't have the same OS on the tablet/phone that they have on the computer...iOS vs OSX...different beasts. Sure, they are converging to some extent, but not to the same extent MS tried with Win8.

My $0.02,

cayenne

I have Windows 8, and I agree, turning Metro off would work for me, I have no intention of buying a 27 or 30 inch touch screen, its impractical to hold up my hands in any event.
 
 
Right now, there is a simple solution, its called Start 8 and costs $5.00.  It does away with the Metro screen, you boot right into the legacy screen, and the start menu is back!
 
A relative, who is a Microsoft manager also uses start 8 on all his PC's, it works very well.
 
On a tablet or cell phone, windows 8 is fine.
 
 

jrista

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Re: The Lumia 1020...final death blow to the Point and Shoot?
« Reply #41 on: July 17, 2013, 04:29:11 PM »
I have to concur that Win-8 sucks big time on a desktop. Metro has no business on a PC machine...

but on a tablet device or a phone, Its far better than my Iphone. The only reason I haven't jumped ship is that the more and more stuff you buy on itunes and the app store, the more it ties you down on the system.  :P I couldn't switch if I wanted too with all my purchases.

It did, I agree. I think Windows 8.1 fixes most of that, though. It still isn't ideal, but a hell of a lot better than what it was. That's Microsoft's MO, though. It always takes a couple versions for quirks to iron out. Also, keep in mind, people utterly HATED Windows XP when it first hit (I remember reading scathing, hateful articles months and months after its initial release), and it was over a year before it became the most used and most loved Windows OS ever. I don't suspect things will be any different for Windows 8...and it is a hell of a lot better release than Windows Vista was (so the next major release should be a pretty significant improvement even over Win8.1).

Microsoft has a different release MO. Apple builds up an unquenchable fervor by not releasing ANY details about its releases until the day they unveil. (Well, they did....seems that may change under Cook, and I guess we'll see whether that is to the detriment of apple in the long term.) Microsoft has always approached releases with lots of software leaks, beta versions, community technology previews, etc. I think that can be good and bad, but these days, it seems it gives people too much time to play with new products before they are even released, encounter all the pre-release bugs, and decide they don't like the product. I would prefer Microsoft take the old Apple/Jobs approach. Don't release anything until its done, and when its released, make sure its solid, and make it a big party. They wouldn't lose people in the beta and CTP phase that way, they wouldn't get a bunch of pre-release bad press, and they would gain the benefit of people being antsy and excited to see and use the next greatest Microsoft thing. People just end up bored with the bugs before new Windows versions are actually released, the excitement is gone, so the release suffers, and it takes longer to build momentum.

Maybe the MS reorg will change things...but I don't really trust Ballmer to be anything other than a raging tool...so....

Windows 2000/NT - Good

Windows ME - Bad

Windows XP - Good

Windows Vista - Bad

Windows 7 - Good

Windows 8 - Bad

Windows 9 - ? Fill the blank.

I love M$ products but not when they revamp something the first time. The second attempt is usually perfect.

Yup, that's pretty much it! :D It would be nice if it became:

Windows 9: Good
Windows 10: Good
   .
   .
   .
Windows N: Good

I get the feeling it will probably be more along the lines of :

Windows 8: So-So
Windows 8.1: Better
Windows 8.2: Even Better
Windows 8.5: Good
Windows 9: Better than Good
Windows 9.1: Even Better than Good

And if there are six to eight months between each release, then reaching Even Better than Good could take years. Assuming they don't end up continuing to flipflop.

I think windows 8.x would be likely received MUCH better, if they would give the user the choice, especially with respect to a real computer (laptop/tower) to completely divorce the Metro UI from the system and allow you to go fully and ONLY into a classic desktop only paradigm.

Why? Seriously, Why?

There are several reasons I don't see any reason to do that. First, if you don't want the new start menu, then you might as well stick with Windows 7. If you want that kind of desktop, then there is very little benefit to moving to Windows 8. Aside from doing away with a lot of the more fancy glass effects, which improve performance a smidge, and a slightly faster boot time...Windows 8 in desktop mode is nearly identical to Windows 7 in desktop mode. There isn't any compelling reason to move to Windows 8 if you loath the new Metro UI that much.

Second, Microsoft has long had the desire to move to a 2D immersive, interactive experience. They started with the "Office 2019" videos from a few years ago, and recently have a few new ones. For the latest, see the following link and click "Future Vision":

http://www.microsoft.com/office/labs/index.html

You can see the older videos here:

http://blogs.technet.com/b/next/archive/2011/10/25/looking-back-on-2019.aspx#.Ueb_kI3bPzw

There are some awesome concepts in those videos. The ubiquitous touch integration on all 2D surfaces, phones, tablets, and other devices that work in harmony, and allow instant transfer of data and responsibility, etc. I really want that. I can't wait until I can tap my phone on my glass coffee table in my living room, and see the days photos, my schedule, etc. all in a clean, pristine 2D touch interface. Windows 8 is the first real stepping stone I've seen towards this vision from Microsoft...and they first started releasing the Offie 2019 videos at least five or six years ago.

The way people complain about the new 2D UI...I think its just the fact that it is new and uncomfortable. I know too many people who have seen Corning's videos of ubiquitous touch computing, and said they would love such a thing...then say they hate Windows 8. Well, hey....pretty much ANY of the Office future concept UIs could be created on Windows 8 today. The parallax scrolling seen in the corporate agriculture apps could be done right now (actually, its already done on the Office Future Vision site I linked above, and it performs like fluid glass on IE10). The transfer of responsibility can already be done today with XBox Glass, which allows you to either remotely control an XBox, or transfer responsibility for playback of music or video from a tablet to a TV. And all people can do is complain about it. Sorry, but that just boggles my mind.

It's just a matter of time before better apps find their way into the Windows Store. Some already are...some of the fitness apps are already getting quite good (i.e. FitBit), and offer very advanced interactive UIs. I think it is also just a matter of time before the kind of advanced manufacturing and agriculture apps find their way into real-world corporations. They just need people to have the vision for them, and to develop them. I don't know when ubiquitous touch computing finds its way into tabletops, windows, walls, etc., but I can't wait.

I think that's largely the main gripe about it, trying to use a tablet UI on a desktop (even if it had touch, not many want to keep their arms up off the desk a lot, constantly touching the screen)....

I agree a bit here, touch shouldn't be the primary mode of interaction for a desktop. I think Windows 8.1 has already fixed a lot of that, and even that being said, Windows 8 started out with very good mouse and keyboard support. You never HAD to use touch for the start screen...it has always supported mouse and keyboard. For that matter, it also has great support for a remote control...I use Windows 8 on my Media PC, and use the remote to move around the tiles and run programs. The remote works well in most Microsoft Win8 apps as well...for example, I just hit the left or right buttons to scroll through news articles,  up and down to scroll through emails, etc.

I think the complaints about the new start screen not working on a desktop are overblown. I also think that Microsoft has done a poor job educating new users how easy it is to use the mouse to control the new UI. Closing an app, for example, often baffles people. It is actually a simple gesture...point to top of screen, click and hold, drag to bottom. It's a simple, fluid motion once you know it exists...most people don't...and that's the real problem. It's one of Microsofts fundamental problems...they have a severe gap in helping their users KNOW how to use their OS.

I hear Win8 is pretty snappy and does good things with memory management, but if they don't allow classic computer users to turn Metro OFF, I think they're gonna lose business. People are NOT in a rush to migrate off Win7, businesses certainly aren't going to migrate, heck, they're just now coming off XP still in many cases.

In Windows 8.1, you can't entirely decouple yourself from Metro, but you can get pretty close. You can boot directly into the classic desktop now, and do everything you used to do...with the exception that the restored start button still brings up the start screen, rather than the classic start menu. There are a myriad of third-party tools (really just registry hacks) that restore the classic start menu. You can do that, if that's what you want...but again, Why? You might as well stick with Windows 7 until it EOLs if that's really how you feel. If you are entirely uninterested in moving into a new era of computing, it isn't like Microsoft is holding a gun to your head. ;)

I mean, look at Apple...they don't have the same OS on the tablet/phone that they have on the computer...iOS vs OSX...different beasts. Sure, they are converging to some extent, but not to the same extent MS tried with Win8.

My $0.02,

cayenne

I guess I think that the dual-platform nature of Windows 8 is its strength against iOS. I think that is how most people feel as well. Windows RT is largely a flop. People don't WANT just Windows Metro, even just on a tablet. People, including myself, explicitly held out for Surface Pro, because we WANT that dual nature. I really love it. I waited years for the ability to run Lightroom on a tablet out in the middle of nowhere Colorado, where I can tether my DSLR to my fully mobile, fully featured PC that neatly rests in the palms of my hands, and effectively get a large screen view camera out of a lowly Canon 7D. I didn't need any extra accessories, custom cables, or anything like that to get it working, either. Personally, I think that is a highly valuable thing. That's something no other company has offered me yet, not even Apple.
« Last Edit: July 17, 2013, 04:33:58 PM by jrista »

magic koala

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Re: The Lumia 1020...final death blow to the Point and Shoot?
« Reply #42 on: July 17, 2013, 04:33:05 PM »
I actually like my HTC Windows Phone. The interface is consistent and simple and it is much easier to use than an Android phone (try giving an Android phone to somebody 60+ and over, I feel the Android phones are more for the tech-customizable-oriented people). I like the simplicity of iPhones as well but I think the Windows phones are quite easy to use. My HTC phone is also a lot thinner, lighter than the iPhone, and the LCD is fantastic. Battery life, admittedly, is so-so but I've just learned to have a lot of USB chargers laying around. Also their speech recognition still needs some work (as compared to Android - man, it is good).

As far as the camera capabilities, I think most people will admit that iPhone cameras can produce very good pics and even the camera in my HTC phone can produce great colors and picture quality - good enough for me to point on a monitor and ask people which one was taken by a DSLR and which one by phone (obviously we're talking outdoor pics). Sometimes I even use my phone as a lighting source when I want to take pics inside a dimly lit place. I just turn on the flashlight app, get a white paper napkin for diffusion and there you go.

I've always wondered why we don't have phones with the thickness of a Canon S95 and a proper zoom lens. I'd put that in a small case on my belt. It'd just be a multi-purpose device. Sorta like a p&s but you can have it upgraded to be a phone - linked to your regular cellular carrier.

Not sure why we would pick one brand over another - most cellphone makers wouldn't be in biz if they didn't perform to a minimum. Most of us switch cellphones as often as 6 months to one year so I just pick the model that has the right OS, price point and features.

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Re: The Lumia 1020...final death blow to the Point and Shoot?
« Reply #42 on: July 17, 2013, 04:33:05 PM »

LetTheRightLensIn

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Re: The Lumia 1020...final death blow to the Point and Shoot?
« Reply #43 on: July 17, 2013, 05:02:02 PM »
I have to concur that Win-8 sucks big time on a desktop. Metro has no business on a PC machine...

but on a tablet device or a phone, Its far better than my Iphone. The only reason I haven't jumped ship is that the more and more stuff you buy on itunes and the app store, the more it ties you down on the system.  :P I couldn't switch if I wanted too with all my purchases.

It did, I agree. I think Windows 8.1 fixes most of that, though. It still isn't ideal, but a hell of a lot better than what it was. That's Microsoft's MO, though. It always takes a couple versions for quirks to iron out. Also, keep in mind, people utterly HATED Windows XP when it first hit (I remember reading scathing, hateful articles months and months after its initial release), and it was over a year before it became the most used and most loved Windows OS ever. I don't suspect things will be any different for Windows 8...and it is a hell of a lot better release than Windows Vista was (so the next major release should be a pretty significant improvement even over Win8.1).

Microsoft has a different release MO. Apple builds up an unquenchable fervor by not releasing ANY details about its releases until the day they unveil. (Well, they did....seems that may change under Cook, and I guess we'll see whether that is to the detriment of apple in the long term.) Microsoft has always approached releases with lots of software leaks, beta versions, community technology previews, etc. I think that can be good and bad, but these days, it seems it gives people too much time to play with new products before they are even released, encounter all the pre-release bugs, and decide they don't like the product. I would prefer Microsoft take the old Apple/Jobs approach. Don't release anything until its done, and when its released, make sure its solid, and make it a big party. They wouldn't lose people in the beta and CTP phase that way, they wouldn't get a bunch of pre-release bad press, and they would gain the benefit of people being antsy and excited to see and use the next greatest Microsoft thing. People just end up bored with the bugs before new Windows versions are actually released, the excitement is gone, so the release suffers, and it takes longer to build momentum.

Maybe the MS reorg will change things...but I don't really trust Ballmer to be anything other than a raging tool...so....

Windows 2000/NT - Good

Windows ME - Bad

Windows XP - Good

Windows Vista - Bad

Windows 7 - Good

Windows 8 - Bad

Windows 9 - ? Fill the blank.

I love M$ products but not when they revamp something the first time. The second attempt is usually perfect.

Actually they are all sort of bad. It's a shame stuff like AmigaOS and such are forgotten and stuff like Windows hangs around.

Anyway, the above list is sort of accurate, but they also never did anything as radically silly as trying to think that a tablet interface is ideal for desktop usage. Like we really want to smear greasy fingers all over photo-editing monitors or hold arms up and lean up to reach 24-36" monitors (or worse if you hook it to an HDTV too).

jrista

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Re: The Lumia 1020...final death blow to the Point and Shoot?
« Reply #44 on: July 17, 2013, 05:02:56 PM »
I actually like my HTC Windows Phone. The interface is consistent and simple and it is much easier to use than an Android phone (try giving an Android phone to somebody 60+ and over, I feel the Android phones are more for the tech-customizable-oriented people). I like the simplicity of iPhones as well but I think the Windows phones are quite easy to use. My HTC phone is also a lot thinner, lighter than the iPhone, and the LCD is fantastic. Battery life, admittedly, is so-so but I've just learned to have a lot of USB chargers laying around. Also their speech recognition still needs some work (as compared to Android - man, it is good).

As far as the camera capabilities, I think most people will admit that iPhone cameras can produce very good pics and even the camera in my HTC phone can produce great colors and picture quality - good enough for me to point on a monitor and ask people which one was taken by a DSLR and which one by phone (obviously we're talking outdoor pics). Sometimes I even use my phone as a lighting source when I want to take pics inside a dimly lit place. I just turn on the flashlight app, get a white paper napkin for diffusion and there you go.

I've always wondered why we don't have phones with the thickness of a Canon S95 and a proper zoom lens. I'd put that in a small case on my belt. It'd just be a multi-purpose device. Sorta like a p&s but you can have it upgraded to be a phone - linked to your regular cellular carrier.

Not sure why we would pick one brand over another - most cellphone makers wouldn't be in biz if they didn't perform to a minimum. Most of us switch cellphones as often as 6 months to one year so I just pick the model that has the right OS, price point and features.

Speech recognition in Windows Phone 8 is phenomenal. It isn't as interactive as Siri, but it is flawless, and even works in noisy environments now. If you haven't tried it, its worth messing with a Windows Phone 8 device in a store somewhere...the voice control, voice texting, etc. is pretty nice.

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Re: The Lumia 1020...final death blow to the Point and Shoot?
« Reply #44 on: July 17, 2013, 05:02:56 PM »