October 25, 2014, 08:45:09 PM

Author Topic: Mechanicals  (Read 2753 times)

mrsfotografie

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Re: Mechanicals
« Reply #15 on: July 26, 2014, 05:37:23 AM »
Here's two that I took for practical reasons, but turned out to pretty good photography, too :)

Now thats funny, creating this thread I was thinking that I should try some macro of my bike wheel hubs, of some chain links and possibly of the cleats mechanism... you've beaten me to that.

...by 6 years ;)

These were actually not shot with a macro, but with a Tamron 28-75 f/2.8 on a 40D. That was an excellent lens with good close focusing ability. Too bad my copy started giving wrong focal lengths in the exif, and poor AF speed most likely due to exposure to humidity on a trip in Africa.

If you're interested, the pics show a venture into 'half step gearing' - a temporary solution I used to modify my roadbike for riding the 'Marmotte' bike ride  in the French Alps. It is normally set up for riding in the Netherlands (flat country), but by combining the 9 speed 11-32 cassette from my mountainbike with a 39t and 42t plus an old Suntour front derailleur that can handle the small step size of the front gears, I ended up having 17 gears of different step size which, despite a complicated shifting pattern, worked like a charm. See http://sheldonbrown.com/gear-theory.html and look for 'Half-Step Gearing'.
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Re: Mechanicals
« Reply #15 on: July 26, 2014, 05:37:23 AM »

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Re: Mechanicals
« Reply #16 on: July 26, 2014, 09:27:34 PM »
Nice images, keep them coming!

Personally, I also like it when my images show some wear and tear (or gunk)... Although this images from my daily job are not very strong artistically.

those are really neat, what kind of magnification? is that fibreglass or carbon and you analyze the failure points? i know a little bit of metalurgy, enough to know why something is broken, and i find the microscopic level of failure analysis fascinating, although its not really necessary for me to know.

the aluminum scratches experience came from trying to get a clean product shot of some industrial nozzle boxes, i wanted them to look nice to sell, but the reality is they are going in the back of service trucks and we dont bother to keep them pristine. i tried cloning them out but between the grain of the brushed aluminum and the variation in colour from the reflections i made zero progress. i'll see if i can track down an example. (cant find i think its on the work computer)

first a shot i kind of like and keep trying to improve upon, have to get in and get out before the camera gets coolant all over it, the shop is annoyingly dark too. i like this one because i managed to get a wisp of smoke and some motion blur at the same time. shutter speed was a hair too slow because i have camera shake too, but at least theres somewhere for improvement!

second shot is a brass bushing, really fun to take pictures of, the brass just glows under the right light.

It is fibreglass. The first one is about 1:1 and the micrograph is only about 35x taken on a scanning electron microscope.  I have some of up to 5000x, but not with me right now. I do material durability testing and those images are for analyzing failure modes.

I understand that for commercial shots, scratches and gunk are not strong selling points. I guess one really needs to start from a brand new part or rebuff it.

I like your image from the lathe turning the threaded bar and the brass does look good indeed.
What a mess, my camera's sensor is full of massless particules that keep on trying to behave like waves!

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Re: Mechanicals
« Reply #17 on: July 26, 2014, 09:38:27 PM »
Here's two that I took for practical reasons, but turned out to pretty good photography, too :)

Now thats funny, creating this thread I was thinking that I should try some macro of my bike wheel hubs, of some chain links and possibly of the cleats mechanism... you've beaten me to that.

...by 6 years ;)

These were actually not shot with a macro, but with a Tamron 28-75 f/2.8 on a 40D. That was an excellent lens with good close focusing ability. Too bad my copy started giving wrong focal lengths in the exif, and poor AF speed most likely due to exposure to humidity on a trip in Africa.

If you're interested, the pics show a venture into 'half step gearing' - a temporary solution I used to modify my roadbike for riding the 'Marmotte' bike ride  in the French Alps. It is normally set up for riding in the Netherlands (flat country), but by combining the 9 speed 11-32 cassette from my mountainbike with a 39t and 42t plus an old Suntour front derailleur that can handle the small step size of the front gears, I ended up having 17 gears of different step size which, despite a complicated shifting pattern, worked like a charm. See http://sheldonbrown.com/gear-theory.html and look for 'Half-Step Gearing'.

Intersting story, I'll check the link for sure. That Sheldon Brown site is a bible for cyclist isn't it. Personally I've been riding a fixed gearfor a few years as I mainly ride around the city and park in crowded bike racks where I've had my derailers bent a few time. Fixies are so much more reliable and give so much feedback when riden with cleats.

I've spent several months in NL in 2011 and it is flat indeed, although the wind can be quite strong along the Ijsselmeer. Needless to say that my Canadian home town now feels so unfriendly to bikers since I've been in NL though.
What a mess, my camera's sensor is full of massless particules that keep on trying to behave like waves!

mrsfotografie

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Re: Mechanicals
« Reply #18 on: July 27, 2014, 05:45:16 AM »
Intersting story, I'll check the link for sure. That Sheldon Brown site is a bible for cyclist isn't it. Personally I've been riding a fixed gearfor a few years as I mainly ride around the city and park in crowded bike racks where I've had my derailers bent a few time. Fixies are so much more reliable and give so much feedback when riden with cleats.

I've built a commuter bike based on a single speed mountainbike frame that addresses that by using an 8-speed internally geared hub. The first photo shows the hub when the bike was new (april 2004). At that time the bike looked like a proper mountainbike with nobby tires and without fenders. The photo was taken with my first digital camera - a Canon PowerShot A20.

The second photo shows the current state of affairs after 10 yrs, the bike has evolved into even more of a city bike with fenders, narrow slick tires and such. Still with the same hub though which now has more than 15000 km on the clock. This photo was taken with a Canon Powershot S90 that I now use for such 'practical' pictures.

I've spent several months in NL in 2011 and it is flat indeed, although the wind can be quite strong along the Ijsselmeer. Needless to say that my Canadian home town now feels so unfriendly to bikers since I've been in NL though.

Yes sometimes I say the wind is our hills. Sometimes the wind feels like a mountain too  :-\ NL is a very bicycle minded country, but for mountain biking and the spectacular nature I think I'd prefer to be in Canada ;)

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Re: Mechanicals
« Reply #19 on: July 27, 2014, 10:21:48 AM »
Thanks for the inspiration all.  I now need to go and find those Prost F1 gears and spark plug I have stored :D
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Re: Mechanicals
« Reply #20 on: July 27, 2014, 01:09:31 PM »
Intersting story, I'll check the link for sure. That Sheldon Brown site is a bible for cyclist isn't it. Personally I've been riding a fixed gearfor a few years as I mainly ride around the city and park in crowded bike racks where I've had my derailers bent a few time. Fixies are so much more reliable and give so much feedback when riden with cleats.

I've built a commuter bike based on a single speed mountainbike frame that addresses that by using an 8-speed internally geared hub. The first photo shows the hub when the bike was new (april 2004). At that time the bike looked like a proper mountainbike with nobby tires and without fenders. The photo was taken with my first digital camera - a Canon PowerShot A20.

The second photo shows the current state of affairs after 10 yrs, the bike has evolved into even more of a city bike with fenders, narrow slick tires and such. Still with the same hub though which now has more than 15000 km on the clock. This photo was taken with a Canon Powershot S90 that I now use for such 'practical' pictures.

I've spent several months in NL in 2011 and it is flat indeed, although the wind can be quite strong along the Ijsselmeer. Needless to say that my Canadian home town now feels so unfriendly to bikers since I've been in NL though.

Yes sometimes I say the wind is our hills. Sometimes the wind feels like a mountain too  :-\ NL is a very bicycle minded country, but for mountain biking and the spectacular nature I think I'd prefer to be in Canada ;)

That looks like a nice bike to ride around on. A friend of mine rides a 3-speeds Nexus hub and also has the front generator/brake hub on a vintage bike. He actually had his front fork breaking off at the shoulder as it was designed for a rim brake and the hub brake force had too much leverage. Luckily, it broke down when he was almost stopped so only minor bruises. I guess this front hub is better for replacing disks.

Here in Montreal, bike theft is such a plague that I'd rather have as inexpensive components as I can. Those Nexus are too expensive for my taste and I've been too frustrated having my stuff stolen. On the other hand, a fixie built on an old road bike fits the bill perfectly.
What a mess, my camera's sensor is full of massless particules that keep on trying to behave like waves!

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Re: Mechanicals
« Reply #21 on: July 27, 2014, 01:11:35 PM »
Thanks for the inspiration all.  I now need to go and find those Prost F1 gears and spark plug I have stored :D

I'll be very angry at you if you don't!
What a mess, my camera's sensor is full of massless particules that keep on trying to behave like waves!

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Re: Mechanicals
« Reply #21 on: July 27, 2014, 01:11:35 PM »

mrsfotografie

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Re: Mechanicals
« Reply #22 on: July 27, 2014, 01:16:45 PM »
Intersting story, I'll check the link for sure. That Sheldon Brown site is a bible for cyclist isn't it. Personally I've been riding a fixed gearfor a few years as I mainly ride around the city and park in crowded bike racks where I've had my derailers bent a few time. Fixies are so much more reliable and give so much feedback when riden with cleats.

I've built a commuter bike based on a single speed mountainbike frame that addresses that by using an 8-speed internally geared hub. The first photo shows the hub when the bike was new (april 2004). At that time the bike looked like a proper mountainbike with nobby tires and without fenders. The photo was taken with my first digital camera - a Canon PowerShot A20.

The second photo shows the current state of affairs after 10 yrs, the bike has evolved into even more of a city bike with fenders, narrow slick tires and such. Still with the same hub though which now has more than 15000 km on the clock. This photo was taken with a Canon Powershot S90 that I now use for such 'practical' pictures.

I've spent several months in NL in 2011 and it is flat indeed, although the wind can be quite strong along the Ijsselmeer. Needless to say that my Canadian home town now feels so unfriendly to bikers since I've been in NL though.

Yes sometimes I say the wind is our hills. Sometimes the wind feels like a mountain too  :-\ NL is a very bicycle minded country, but for mountain biking and the spectacular nature I think I'd prefer to be in Canada ;)

That looks like a nice bike to ride around on. A friend of mine rides a 3-speeds Nexus hub and also has the front generator/brake hub on a vintage bike. He actually had his front fork breaking off at the shoulder as it was designed for a rim brake and the hub brake force had too much leverage. Luckily, it broke down when he was almost stopped so only minor bruises. I guess this front hub is better for replacing disks.

Here in Montreal, bike theft is such a plague that I'd rather have as inexpensive components as I can. Those Nexus are too expensive for my taste and I've been too frustrated having my stuff stolen. On the other hand, a fixie built on an old road bike fits the bill perfectly.

On theft, I think here in the Netherlands, bicycles are almost considered public property so I make sure to use a good lock. If I think it's iffy I'll use an old crappy bike.
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Re: Mechanicals
« Reply #23 on: July 27, 2014, 02:45:50 PM »
Intersting story, I'll check the link for sure. That Sheldon Brown site is a bible for cyclist isn't it. Personally I've been riding a fixed gearfor a few years as I mainly ride around the city and park in crowded bike racks where I've had my derailers bent a few time. Fixies are so much more reliable and give so much feedback when riden with cleats.

I've built a commuter bike based on a single speed mountainbike frame that addresses that by using an 8-speed internally geared hub. The first photo shows the hub when the bike was new (april 2004). At that time the bike looked like a proper mountainbike with nobby tires and without fenders. The photo was taken with my first digital camera - a Canon PowerShot A20.

The second photo shows the current state of affairs after 10 yrs, the bike has evolved into even more of a city bike with fenders, narrow slick tires and such. Still with the same hub though which now has more than 15000 km on the clock. This photo was taken with a Canon Powershot S90 that I now use for such 'practical' pictures.

I've spent several months in NL in 2011 and it is flat indeed, although the wind can be quite strong along the Ijsselmeer. Needless to say that my Canadian home town now feels so unfriendly to bikers since I've been in NL though.

Yes sometimes I say the wind is our hills. Sometimes the wind feels like a mountain too  :-\ NL is a very bicycle minded country, but for mountain biking and the spectacular nature I think I'd prefer to be in Canada ;)

That looks like a nice bike to ride around on. A friend of mine rides a 3-speeds Nexus hub and also has the front generator/brake hub on a vintage bike. He actually had his front fork breaking off at the shoulder as it was designed for a rim brake and the hub brake force had too much leverage. Luckily, it broke down when he was almost stopped so only minor bruises. I guess this front hub is better for replacing disks.

Here in Montreal, bike theft is such a plague that I'd rather have as inexpensive components as I can. Those Nexus are too expensive for my taste and I've been too frustrated having my stuff stolen. On the other hand, a fixie built on an old road bike fits the bill perfectly.

On theft, I think here in the Netherlands, bicycles are almost considered public property so I make sure to use a good lock. If I think it's iffy I'll use an old crappy bike.

My two locks are the most expensive parts on my bike apart from the wheels. The thing is that you can't really lock your hubs and you can just unbolt them and rip the spokes off. Thief will go there here. It is amazing because Montreal is such a safe place otherwise.
What a mess, my camera's sensor is full of massless particules that keep on trying to behave like waves!

mrsfotografie

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Re: Mechanicals
« Reply #24 on: July 27, 2014, 02:53:56 PM »
My two locks are the most expensive parts on my bike apart from the wheels. The thing is that you can't really lock your hubs and you can just unbolt them and rip the spokes off. Thief will go there here. It is amazing because Montreal is such a safe place otherwise.

That's really extreme! Not much that can be done about such persistence.  :-\ Fortunately over here most people tend to see a bike more as one piece of kit. It always amazes me that people say their bike is 'broken' and mean the whole thing. Why they don't think of it as made of individual parts is beyond me...
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Re: Mechanicals
« Reply #25 on: September 07, 2014, 10:44:38 PM »
in amsterdam i saw a bike locked to a bridge by the frame, and EVERYTHING was stripped from it, right down to the headset and bottom bracket. stuff you need specialized tools to remove. i guess it wasn't so much a bike locked to the bridge anymore as a frame.  :o

here's a shot i thought was kind of neat, some skidplates for my toyota, and a cool view of all the suspension bits.

snip

My two locks are the most expensive parts on my bike apart from the wheels. The thing is that you can't really lock your hubs and you can just unbolt them and rip the spokes off. Thief will go there here. It is amazing because Montreal is such a safe place otherwise.

If you have 20mm front hubs guys used to make custom axles with a unique head, and a matching tool, that a normal wrench wont work on. rounded triangle like a fire hydrant works well. i think someone started selling them but that was 10+ years ago and i dont know if they ever took off.
« Last Edit: September 07, 2014, 10:47:36 PM by Logan »

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Re: Mechanicals
« Reply #25 on: September 07, 2014, 10:44:38 PM »