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Author Topic: Screw-in variable ND filters  (Read 8830 times)


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Re: Screw-in variable ND filters
« Reply #15 on: July 30, 2013, 02:04:30 PM »

tetten

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Re: Screw-in variable ND filters
« Reply #16 on: July 30, 2013, 04:14:38 PM »
I own a Vari-ND from Singh-Ray as well as a Lee Filter set. I mostly shoot landscapes and have only used my Vari-ND 2 or 3 times. The vignetting and the "X" as was already mentioned will all but kill most landscape use with a wide angle lens. They are starting to make "thin" versions of these filters but just going off of Singh-Ray's website the normal mount is 14.1mm and the thin is 10.5mm. This may help a small amount but you are still going to have a vignetting and the horrible "X" that will appear across your photos. The "X" mentioned can be avoided with careful positioning, but I found that even when shots appeared on the camera's LCD to not have the "X", when I imported them into Lightroom and looked at them on a 24" monitor the "X" really popped out. The best best if you want to do ultra long exposures is just suck it up/save up the money and get a square filter for the Lee system. I didn't want to wait for the Lee Big stopper so I picked up the Hitech 2nd gen version and it produces acceptable results as long as you set it up properly. (Lined up so the foam stops light leakage through the sides of the filter and blocking light from getting in the viewfinder)

On Singh-Ray's website they use waterfalls as an example of a good time to use a Vari-ND, however the folly of this example lies in the fact that waterfalls are best shot in times when skies are overcast or before the sun is hitting the waterfall on a clear day. Under these circumstances a simple polarizer should provide a long enough shutter length to blur the water while at the same time reducing reflections/boosting saturations.

Also, whatever you do , do NOT purchase a screw on high density non-variable ND filter, having to screw on and screw off the filter to make compositions of a scene is the last thing you want to do when working a location. This is just another good reason to save up/suck it up and get a filter system so you can easily install/remove filters.

AcutancePhotography

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Re: Screw-in variable ND filters
« Reply #17 on: July 31, 2013, 12:58:53 PM »
I too was undecided on whether to go with one variable ND filter or a set of fixed filters.  I ultimately decided on the Marumi Variable ND filter in 77mm.

Used it the other weekend to take some shots of a nice fountain.  I found it easy to use and liked the image quality.  A friend of mine recommended Marumi and I think it was a good recommendation.
I shoot with a Camera Obscura with an optical device attached that refracts and transmits light

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Re: Screw-in variable ND filters
« Reply #17 on: July 31, 2013, 12:58:53 PM »