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Author Topic: Wedding where you can't move  (Read 3104 times)

brianleighty

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Wedding where you can't move
« on: August 26, 2013, 10:00:49 PM »
So I have my first wedding coming up in a few months where I can't move position. There'll be both me and my wife so at least there'll be some variety but I'm definitely used to moving around for variety. My question for those that have dealt with this is should I try to get as much of a focal range as possible to vary things or just focus more on just catching the best moments? Also, I haven't done a site scout yet but if I am super far back, do I rent something longer than the 70-200 I normally rent or just have wider shots instead? Appreciate the advice.
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Wedding where you can't move
« on: August 26, 2013, 10:00:49 PM »

Jim Saunders

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Re: Wedding where you can't move
« Reply #1 on: August 26, 2013, 10:58:54 PM »
If you can employ one, a 300 f/4 is no more to look at than your 70-200.  A 300 /2.8 might be a bit of a distraction.

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brianleighty

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Re: Wedding where you can't move
« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2013, 11:49:10 PM »
Yeah, was looking at the 300. I'm assuming you're talking about the 300 f/4 IS correct? My main question was do I go with the 70-200 with an extender or on a crop body for the zoom flexibility or go with the 300 f/4 for the better image quality and faster AF( if I'm using an extender).
If you can employ one, a 300 f/4 is no more to look at than your 70-200.  A 300 /2.8 might be a bit of a distraction.

Jim
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brianleighty

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Re: Wedding where you can't move
« Reply #3 on: August 27, 2013, 12:01:53 AM »
If you can employ one, a 300 f/4 is no more to look at than your 70-200.  A 300 /2.8 might be a bit of a distraction.

Jim
Since you brought up the 300, another option I've been toying with is the 100-400. Obviously not quite as good optically but it does have a broad range. For around $19 more than renting the 70-200 I could rent the 100-400 and 135mm f/2 or perhaps even better the 85mm 1.2 to bring back some of the 70-100 range lost by not having the 70-200. Been wanting to try that one out as well but always stick with the 70-200 for it's versatility.
« Last Edit: August 27, 2013, 12:15:15 AM by brianleighty »
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Re: Wedding where you can't move
« Reply #4 on: August 27, 2013, 12:12:29 AM »
Also, I haven't done a site scout yet but if I am super far back, do I rent something longer than the 70-200 I normally rent or just have wider shots instead? Appreciate the advice.
I would use a wide focal length range for some variety, perhaps 24mm to 200mm, or even 16mm to 200mm.  As for needing anything longer than a 70-200 -- that depends entirely on the location. 

brianleighty

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Re: Wedding where you can't move
« Reply #5 on: August 27, 2013, 12:16:21 AM »
Also, I haven't done a site scout yet but if I am super far back, do I rent something longer than the 70-200 I normally rent or just have wider shots instead? Appreciate the advice.
I would use a wide focal length range for some variety, perhaps 24mm to 200mm, or even 16mm to 200mm.  As for needing anything longer than a 70-200 -- that depends entirely on the location.
Thanks for the input. I understand it depends on location. Would you say if you can get full body head to feet that that's tight enough or is more needed?
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Re: Wedding where you can't move
« Reply #6 on: August 27, 2013, 01:01:24 AM »
Can you hide a camera or two and use a remote trigger?

Any chance of just doing an re-enactment?  Bride should know what you're working within, so as long as expectations are set, you should be fine.
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Re: Wedding where you can't move
« Reply #6 on: August 27, 2013, 01:01:24 AM »

adhocphotographer

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Re: Wedding where you can't move
« Reply #7 on: August 27, 2013, 01:29:26 AM »
Sounds tough...  what i don't understand is why you can't move?

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Re: Wedding where you can't move
« Reply #8 on: August 27, 2013, 01:32:15 AM »
In my experience, you can usually move even when they say you can't. It's rare that a coordinator will actually go out of their way during the ceremony and stop you in your tracks, and if so, at least you tried. You're doing your job and as long as you're not distracting, no one should care. Sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do to get the shot.

brianleighty

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Re: Wedding where you can't move
« Reply #9 on: August 27, 2013, 10:27:47 AM »
Can you hide a camera or two and use a remote trigger?

Any chance of just doing an re-enactment?  Bride should know what you're working within, so as long as expectations are set, you should be fine.
Yeah, I'm going to meet with the coordinator to see if I can have a remote camera somewhere. Not a bad idea with the re-enactment but we only have one hour before hand (don't want to see each other) and 30 minutes after during which we'll running to try and get the formals done. Sigh people seem to underestimate how formals take. Yes, they are aware of it but I'll reiterate after I found out what I'm actually working with.
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brianleighty

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Re: Wedding where you can't move
« Reply #10 on: August 27, 2013, 10:34:19 AM »
Sounds tough...  what i don't understand is why you can't move?
Catholic church. I'm assuming they want the bride and groom to be the focus. They also have limitations on flash which will be fun as I'm used to working with on camera flash. I can still do flash but it has to be from the back of the sanctuary.
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ablearcher

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Re: Wedding where you can't move
« Reply #11 on: August 27, 2013, 11:47:10 AM »
Two things: 1. Discuss location limitations with the bride and make sure you have this in your contract (the Clients confirm they are aware of location limitations for photography). Clients need to have reasonable expectations. The location is their choice and they need to discuss this stuff with coordinators, priests, etc. They can expect certain shots from the back but they should not be expecting say low right angle shots from the first row, or side shots, etc. These are the limitations of the location which they picked, so they need to have a good understanding of this stuff before the wedding day.
2. Scout the location and have a chat with the priest. Speculating regarding lenses before that is really pointless.

Also, when i work with limited movement situations, I do bring primes but having zooms is a must.

30 minutes for formals is not enough. By the time everyone gets out of the church, all hugs and kisses, etc, etc and you will have 15 minutes left. Are you doing formals right next to the church? Are you doing formals of the wedding party or family shots? Family shots take longer. Well posed formals take longer. What if the weather is bad and you need to drive to an indoor location? Talk to the priest and maybe he will allow  posed wedding party shots inside the church with the flash after the ceremony is done.  More importantly - discuss this with the bride so she has a clue of the impact of time limitations.

Planning is the key, especially if you are just starting with weddings.

Good luck!
« Last Edit: August 27, 2013, 11:56:54 AM by ablearcher »
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brianleighty

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Re: Wedding where you can't move
« Reply #12 on: August 27, 2013, 11:50:31 AM »
Two things: 1. Discuss location limitations with the bride and make sure you have this in your contract (the Clients confirm they are aware of location limitations for photography). Clients need to have reasonable expectations. The location is their choice and they need to discuss this stuff with coordinators, priests, etc. They can expect certain shots from the back but they should not be expecting say low right angle shots from the first row, or side shots, etc. These are the limitations of the location which they picked, so they need to have a good understanding of this stuff before the wedding day.
2. Scout the location and have a chat with the priest. Speculating regarding lenses before that is really pointless.

Also, when i work with limited movement situations, I do bring primes but having zooms is a must.

Good luck!

Good points. Thanks. I already have something in my contract about not being able to get all the pictures the client may want but I could probably expand this to include explaining being limited by location or staff.
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Re: Wedding where you can't move
« Reply #12 on: August 27, 2013, 11:50:31 AM »

distant.star

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Re: Wedding where you can't move
« Reply #13 on: August 27, 2013, 02:59:24 PM »
.
Well put, Archie. A couple of thoughts:

1. From experience, Catholic churches always have policies like this. Generally, they view anything outside the liturgical ritual an unwanted distraction. However, not all priests agree -- you may have a presiding priest who doesn't give a damn what you do. Last time I did pictures in a Catholic church I talked with the priest beforehand and all he had to say was "Make sure you get my good side."

2. I see two choices. First, either make it explicit in the contract and make sure bride (and whoever is paying the bills) understands they may not get what they want because of this policy. Then do the best you can given the location. Second choice, once the ceremony starts, do whatever you need to do. They're not going to interrupt things and tell you to sit down. Be reasonable in your movements, but be where you need to be. In the unlikely event the priest gives you hell afterward, tell him you'll see him in Confession! I strongly believe in the adage, "Asking forgiveness is easier than seeking permission."

3. I immediately thought of the remote cameras idea. That may be a good alternative, especially if you can get something reasonably close and WA.

4. Given the church itself, it may be a great place for formals. You'll need to have a good lighting setup ready to go. Second shooter or assistant a must.

5. Just for background, the Catholics have been at war with funeral directors over this sort of thing for a while now. The Church feels the funeral directors are trying to take over the funeral mass. The funeral directors don't like being told they can't do what they believe they need to do. It's gotten quite unpleasant in some places. Perhaps this is bleeding over (so to speak) into the weddings realm.

Good luck.




Two things: 1. Discuss location limitations with the bride and make sure you have this in your contract (the Clients confirm they are aware of location limitations for photography). Clients need to have reasonable expectations. The location is their choice and they need to discuss this stuff with coordinators, priests, etc. They can expect certain shots from the back but they should not be expecting say low right angle shots from the first row, or side shots, etc. These are the limitations of the location which they picked, so they need to have a good understanding of this stuff before the wedding day.
2. Scout the location and have a chat with the priest. Speculating regarding lenses before that is really pointless.

Also, when i work with limited movement situations, I do bring primes but having zooms is a must.

30 minutes for formals is not enough. By the time everyone gets out of the church, all hugs and kisses, etc, etc and you will have 15 minutes left. Are you doing formals right next to the church? Are you doing formals of the wedding party or family shots? Family shots take longer. Well posed formals take longer. What if the weather is bad and you need to drive to an indoor location? Talk to the priest and maybe he will allow  posed wedding party shots inside the church with the flash after the ceremony is done.  More importantly - discuss this with the bride so she has a clue of the impact of time limitations.

Planning is the key, especially if you are just starting with weddings.

Good luck!
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Re: Wedding where you can't move
« Reply #14 on: August 27, 2013, 04:39:47 PM »
Also, I haven't done a site scout yet but if I am super far back, do I rent something longer than the 70-200 I normally rent or just have wider shots instead? Appreciate the advice.
I would use a wide focal length range for some variety, perhaps 24mm to 200mm, or even 16mm to 200mm.  As for needing anything longer than a 70-200 -- that depends entirely on the location.
Thanks for the input. I understand it depends on location. Would you say if you can get full body head to feet that that's tight enough or is more needed?
Yes, that would be tight enough for me.  I would not rent a longer lens in that situation.  This comes down to your own preference:  do you really want a tight shot (like upper body only) from the back of the church?  Normally, you would have it.  But it's not essential in every case, especially when so restricted.  And, depending on the camera, cropping can help.

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Re: Wedding where you can't move
« Reply #14 on: August 27, 2013, 04:39:47 PM »