August 01, 2014, 07:51:44 AM

Author Topic: Choosing the right tripod  (Read 4861 times)

Drizzt321

  • 1D X
  • *******
  • Posts: 1668
    • View Profile
    • Aaron Baff Photography
Re: Choosing the right tripod
« Reply #15 on: September 25, 2013, 03:19:29 PM »
I've got a pretty nice Benro carbon fiber that wasn't too much. Specced for 17 pounds, and boy am I glad I went for a bit higher weight as I end up using it mostly for my Mamiya RB67, and that's one heavy camera! Add 10 pounds above her expected weight for future accessories/lens/camera growth.

Definitely get a head that's Acra-Swiss compatible. Probably the most popular, and works quite well. With screw clamp you can use it with anyone's version, while really RRS and someone else only puts to extremely fine tolerance that the quick release lever will work well for.

Oh, and the 70-200 is great, but if she's focusing on portraits the 135L is a great buy for that, and she can use the 24-105 for 50 & 85mm if she doesn't want to get those primes (85 f/1.8 is a great deal too). Not saying she shouldn't get the 70-300L, but she can probably save some money by not getting it if she doesn't actually need the telephoto end right now.
5D mark 2, 5D mark 3, EF 17-40mm f/4L,  EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM, EF 135mm f/2L, EF 85mm f/1.8
Film Cameras: Mamiya RB67, RB-50, RB-180-C, RB-90-C, RB-50, Perkeo I folder, Mamiya Six Folder (Pre-WWII model)
http://www.aaronbaff.com

canon rumors FORUM

Re: Choosing the right tripod
« Reply #15 on: September 25, 2013, 03:19:29 PM »

Mt Spokane Photography

  • Canon EF 600mm f/4L IS II
  • ********
  • Posts: 8285
    • View Profile
Re: Choosing the right tripod
« Reply #16 on: September 25, 2013, 03:49:32 PM »
One thing to look out for is the height of the tripod.  No matter how good a tripod is built, if its not tall enough to use without cranking up the center column, it will not be stable enough for long exposures, and it will be susceptible to blowing over in the wind.  Hanging a camera bag of gear on the under hook (get one with a underhook) can prevent blowing over.
 
Also consider uneven surfaces, and the need to collapse one leg to level the tripod.  This means that extra height is needed.  The head plus distance to the camera eyepiece can add 6-8 inches, so if her eye level is 5'6 inches above the ground, I'd start with a tripod that is no less than 60 inches high with center colum down, and no head.  A few more inches will help handle uneven surfaces.
 
Unfortunately, many tripods are only 48 inches high and you must raise the center column to use them.  They are a waste of money IMHO.
I have a Redged Monopod, and I think their tripod would be good.  Don't get their head though.  Manfroto makes good quality tripods as well as cheapies.
Here is a example of a tripod that is too short for me, but costs a ton.  Its 55.1 inches high, so raise the center column or bend over a lot.  If they don't give height with column down, pass it up!  None of the Manfroto 055 series are tall enough for me (5 ft min) without extending the center column.  I can't recommend them, that's midget territory. 
 
http://www.amazon.com/Manfrotto-055CXPRO3-Section-Magnesium-Castings/dp/B001GIPR5S/ref=sr_1_2?s=photo&ie=UTF8&qid=1380136584&sr=1-2&keywords=tripod+carbon
 
 
The Manfrotto 057 series has one that is tall enough, but $$$ 
 
http://www.manfrotto.us/057-carbon-fiber-4-section-tripod
 
 
The Redged TSC 531 is there only model they have that goes barely tall enough for me with center column down.  its a lot less expensive than the Manfrotto, but I can't find them in the USA.
 
http://redged.com/tsc-531.html
 
Induro makes tripods plenty tall enough.
 
http://www.amazon.com/Induro-CT-313-Carbon-Section-73-Inch/dp/B002SXMRQW/ref=sr_1_5?s=photo&ie=UTF8&qid=1380137699&sr=1-5&keywords=tripod+carbon
 
Feisol has one that's close to 5 ft tall
http://www.amazon.com/Feisol-CT-3472-4-Section-Carbon-Tripod/dp/B00573NCDW/ref=sr_1_9?s=photo&ie=UTF8&qid=1380137866&sr=1-9&keywords=tripod+carbon
 
 
 
 

waving_odd

  • Rebel T5i
  • ****
  • Posts: 149
    • View Profile
Re: Choosing the right tripod
« Reply #17 on: September 25, 2013, 05:15:50 PM »
...Even more so now that they have some Arca-Swiss compatible clamps, meaning a good (RRS/Kirk) L-bracket is feasible...  Bottom line, I'd recommend Manfrotto CF legs and one of their new AS-compatible heads...


When they announced this 2 months ago, I was excited and looking for review.

Finally, there was this - http://www.scvphotoideas.com/2013/08/manfrotto-q6-top-lock-qr-adaptor.html

"...Therefore, I may come to the conclusion that Manfrotto has succeeded once again in introducing a proprietary "Arca-compatible" system..."

I guess we can hope Manfrotto to come up with improved models/versions later.  But I will pass this one.   :P
« Last Edit: September 25, 2013, 05:19:17 PM by waving_odd »

neuroanatomist

  • CR GEEK
  • ********
  • Posts: 13623
    • View Profile
Re: Choosing the right tripod
« Reply #18 on: September 25, 2013, 05:38:58 PM »
...Even more so now that they have some Arca-Swiss compatible clamps, meaning a good (RRS/Kirk) L-bracket is feasible...  Bottom line, I'd recommend Manfrotto CF legs and one of their new AS-compatible heads...


When they announced this 2 months ago, I was excited and looking for review.

Finally, there was this - http://www.scvphotoideas.com/2013/08/manfrotto-q6-top-lock-qr-adaptor.html

"...Therefore, I may come to the conclusion that Manfrotto has succeeded once again in introducing a proprietary "Arca-compatible" system..."

I guess we can hope Manfrotto to come up with improved models/versions later.  But I will pass this one.   :P


Thanks for posting that link.  Good demonstration that while their new Arca plate may be compatible with other clamps, their clamp is (again) basically proprietary - and since their L-brackets leave much to be desired, that's not a viable solution.  All I can say is, WTF Manfrotto?!? 

As for a new version, they'll likely rename the plate with one or two successive alpha/numerical designations...and leave the flawed design just the way it is. Bummer.
EOS 1D X, EOS M, and lots of lenses
______________________________
Flickr | TDP Profile/Gear List

ahab1372

  • 7D
  • *****
  • Posts: 327
    • View Profile
Re: Choosing the right tripod
« Reply #19 on: September 25, 2013, 07:27:37 PM »
One thing to look out for is the height of the tripod.  No matter how good a tripod is built, if its not tall enough to use without cranking up the center column, it will not be stable enough for long exposures, and it will be susceptible to blowing over in the wind.  Hanging a camera bag of gear on the under hook (get one with a underhook) can prevent blowing over.
 [...]
Good point on the height. The aforementioned Sirui M-3004 and M-3204 (the latter is the CF version) are tall enough for me (191cm or 6'2'') without center column extended

fugu82

  • EOS M2
  • ****
  • Posts: 159
    • View Profile
Re: Choosing the right tripod
« Reply #20 on: September 25, 2013, 10:14:42 PM »
Wow, after reading these excellent replies I suddenly remembered that I need to crouch when using my Manfrotto MH054/190CXPRO4 without extending the column.

I am 5'4".

I guess the manufacturers are strictly going for minimal packing length.

privatebydesign

  • Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS II
  • *******
  • Posts: 2088
  • Ermintrude says "moo"
    • View Profile
Re: Choosing the right tripod
« Reply #21 on: September 25, 2013, 10:59:51 PM »
I am 5' 10" and a tiny bit, when my camera is mounted on a ballhead on the 055CXPRO3 with no column extension the viewfinder is 5' 4.5", it lines up perfectly with my eye when standing straight, no bending or stooping, obviously it depends entirely on how tall you are, how tall you camera and ballhead are etc. In the field I normally find myself not extending to max leg length anyway, I find it is a touch too tall to do fast panning and for landscapes and scenics it is generally much too tall.

As a good tripod recommendation, not too expensive, not throwaway, not likely to be outgrown quickly, hold its value well, the 055CXPRO3 is very difficult to not recommend. If mine got stolen tomorrow I'd buy another without question.
The best time to plant a tree is twenty-five years ago. The second best time is today.

canon rumors FORUM

Re: Choosing the right tripod
« Reply #21 on: September 25, 2013, 10:59:51 PM »