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Author Topic: Havasupai Falls  (Read 2153 times)

yellowbull

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Havasupai Falls
« on: October 08, 2013, 01:01:27 PM »
Im hiking down to Havasupai Falls in the Grand Canyon next week. I'm trying to limit how much I carry down with me. I'm trying to figure out what lenses to bring. I have Canon 5D MkIII. My lense choices are 17-40, 24-105. I also have 70-200 and 85 and 135 Prime. Any advice would be appreciated. I think I only want to take two of them.

Any other advice about the hike would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Dave

Plato the Wise

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Re: Havasupai Falls
« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2013, 01:08:18 PM »
17-40 and 70-200 if would want to travel light. You will have pretty much all focal lengths needed. Don't underestimate the use of a telephoto for landscapes. You can isolate interesting subjects and flatten/compress vistas.

yablonsky

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Re: Havasupai Falls
« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2013, 01:21:24 PM »
17-40 and 70-200 if would want to travel light. You will have pretty much all focal lengths needed. Don't underestimate the use of a telephoto for landscapes. You can isolate interesting subjects and flatten/compress vistas.

+1
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Valvebounce

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Re: Havasupai Falls
« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2013, 05:49:13 PM »
Hi Dave
I would stop worrying about what you are carrying down and concentrate on what you will be carrying back up!  ;D Have you thought about going by mule?
On a more serious note all I can offer is take care and have a good trip, others have already done the advice bit.

Cheers. Graham.
7D + Grip, 40D + Grip, 20D, EF-S 17-85 Kit lens, EF 70-200 f2.8 L IS II USM, EF 2x III, Sigma 150-500, Sigma 17-70 f2.8-4 C, 50mm f1.8, 550EX some Filters Remotes Macro tubes Tripod heads etc!
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duydaniel

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Re: Havasupai Falls
« Reply #4 on: October 08, 2013, 06:14:44 PM »
carry ALL with you.
Peace of mind is always better  8)

Zen

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Re: Havasupai Falls
« Reply #5 on: October 08, 2013, 06:32:30 PM »
As Graham said, what goes down must come up!!

Also, you might want to check if the trails are open. Heard on the news that Nat'l Parks are closed during the "shut-down".

Good luck , and have a great trip. :)

Zen

PS: Don't forget to take a BUNCH of cards and an extra hot battery!


gmrza

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Re: Havasupai Falls
« Reply #6 on: October 08, 2013, 06:59:28 PM »
Im hiking down to Havasupai Falls in the Grand Canyon next week. I'm trying to limit how much I carry down with me. I'm trying to figure out what lenses to bring. I have Canon 5D MkIII. My lense choices are 17-40, 24-105. I also have 70-200 and 85 and 135 Prime. Any advice would be appreciated. I think I only want to take two of them.

Any other advice about the hike would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Dave

If you are going to be photographing waterfalls, think about how you are going to get to an exposure of 1 to 3s to blur the water.  You probably will need a 3 stop ND filter or maybe 6 stops if working on broad daylight.
If carrying a tripod is not an option, the you can shoot 1/6s to 1/4s hand held with the 24-105mm at 24mm fairly reliably.  You may still need a ND filter to do that.
You may want to consider whether it is possible to carry something like a Gorillapod with, otherwise the approach I outlined above of using a wide angle lens with IS will help with photographing waterfalls.
Also think about taking a circular polariser.

I have to admit, I would probably make do with the 24-105 and 17-40.  If I could take only one lens it would be the 24-105.
I spent last week in the Grampians and between my wife and myself we had a 5DII, 5DIII, 24-70 II, 24-105, 70-200 IS II, 17-40, 15mm fisheye, 50mm f/1.4 and 100mm L macro.  The 24-70 and 24-105 saw most use.  After that the 100mm macro and then we took a couple of shots with the 17-40 and 70-200.  The fisheye and 50mm did not get used.  We used a 3 stop ND for waterfalls and circular PL quite a bit.  Our 10 stop ND did not see any use.
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Cali_PH

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Re: Havasupai Falls
« Reply #7 on: October 08, 2013, 07:19:26 PM »
If you are going to be photographing waterfalls, think about how you are going to get to an exposure of 1 to 3s to blur the water.  You probably will need a 3 stop ND filter or maybe 6 stops if working on broad daylight.
If carrying a tripod is not an option, the you can shoot 1/6s to 1/4s hand held with the 24-105mm at 24mm fairly reliably.  You may still need a ND filter to do that.
You may want to consider whether it is possible to carry something like a Gorillapod with, otherwise the approach I outlined above of using a wide angle lens with IS will help with photographing waterfalls.
Also think about taking a circular polariser.

I have to admit, I would probably make do with the 24-105 and 17-40.  If I could take only one lens it would be the 24-105.
I spent last week in the Grampians and between my wife and myself we had a 5DII, 5DIII, 24-70 II, 24-105, 70-200 IS II, 17-40, 15mm fisheye, 50mm f/1.4 and 100mm L macro.  The 24-70 and 24-105 saw most use.  After that the 100mm macro and then we took a couple of shots with the 17-40 and 70-200.  The fisheye and 50mm did not get used.  We used a 3 stop ND for waterfalls and circular PL quite a bit.  Our 10 stop ND did not see any use.

I agree with this; when I went, I only shot with the 17-40 & 24-105, but I do realize other people may want to use the 70-200 at times too. 

Regarding the hike itself, obviously don't forget to take food and water...and the fact that it'll add more weight.  I'd seriously consider the mules or the helicopter, depending on the day you go.  I had to argue with my friend for the helicopter.  The helicopter was well worth the $ IMO, not only in not having to hike, but since it's about a 5 minute flight that's hours more shooting, not hiking; also saved our legs for the rest of the trip.  Once we got there and saw people literally barely able to walk as they climbed out of the canyon coming back, she agreed with me lol. But that all depends on your fitness level of course.

Don Haines

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Re: Havasupai Falls
« Reply #8 on: October 08, 2013, 07:24:24 PM »
I have a hiking pole that doubles as a monopod.....VERY useful....

Going down is always harder on the knees than coming up... a hiking pole (or 2) can really save your knees.

I use a hiking backpack to carry my gear, they are WAY!!! easier to carry than any camera bag. Don't forget to bring a couple of litres of water, some snacks, warm enough clothing, a spare pair of socks, and a headlamp... I have walked out of a few hikes in the dark and a good headlamp is indispensable. I also carry a small first aid kit, in 35 years of hiking I have only used band-aids and some moleskin for blisters... but when you need it, you need it NOW!

And don't forget to show us your pictures afterwards :)
The best camera is the one in your hands

Valvebounce

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Re: Havasupai Falls
« Reply #9 on: October 08, 2013, 07:47:34 PM »

I agree with this; when I went, I only shot with the 17-40 & 24-105, but I do realize other people may want to use the 70-200 at times too. 

Regarding the hike itself, obviously don't forget to take food and water...and the fact that it'll add more weight.  I'd seriously consider the mules or the helicopter, depending on the day you go.  I had to argue with my friend for the helicopter.  The helicopter was well worth the $ IMO, not only in not having to hike, but since it's about a 5 minute flight that's hours more shooting, not hiking; also saved our legs for the rest of the trip.  Once we got there and saw people literally barely able to walk as they climbed out of the canyon coming back, she agreed with me lol. But that all depends on your fitness level of course.

Hi folks,
It was the memory of the hikers coming out of the canyon that led me to suggest the mules, one guy, who probably shouldn't have been allowed to hike practically crawled over the rim and looked like he was going to arrest when he finally made it to a seat.

Cheers. Graham.
7D + Grip, 40D + Grip, 20D, EF-S 17-85 Kit lens, EF 70-200 f2.8 L IS II USM, EF 2x III, Sigma 150-500, Sigma 17-70 f2.8-4 C, 50mm f1.8, 550EX some Filters Remotes Macro tubes Tripod heads etc!
20D, BG-E2N, 17-85mm, 50mm are pre loved. :)
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gmrza

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Re: Havasupai Falls
« Reply #10 on: October 08, 2013, 07:59:58 PM »

Hi folks,
It was the memory of the hikers coming out of the canyon that led me to suggest the mules, one guy, who probably shouldn't have been allowed to hike practically crawled over the rim and looked like he was going to arrest when he finally made it to a seat.

Cheers. Graham.

That is something the individual needs to be able to make a judgement call on.  I have taken a SLR through the Fish River Canyon in Namibia (EOS 650 with 35-70mm and 70-210mm + a Speedlite 430EZ) - that is a 86km hike.  An acquaintance of my father's managed to fall into the water with his SLR in the Fish River Canyon (not good).  One of the checks and balances in place for the Fish River Canyon is that you have to produce a medical certificate before starting the hike.
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Vossie

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Re: Havasupai Falls
« Reply #11 on: October 08, 2013, 09:16:56 PM »
17-40+24-105+70-200 is a good option.

I've done many long hikes with a gripped 30D, 10-22, 17-85, 100-400 and 550EX including a 3-day hike along the Ol Doinyo Lengai vulcano in Tanzania en into the Grand Canyon from the North Rim.  If you have a good backpack the weight will not feel too heavy.

I normally do not like carrying a tripod; my Gitzo is quite heavy and bulky. I have gotten some good results with a bean bag (which can be filled with light weigth material). I put my backpack on the ground with the bean bag on top of it. That helps to stabilize your camera for long (waterfall) exposures. Indeed the idea of bringing some ND filters is a good one. When I use my Lee bigstopper, I always use the Canon TC-80N3 remote timer. It prevents motion blur and -more importantly- allows using longer that 30s shutterspeeds without having to touch the camera.
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aroo

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Re: Havasupai Falls
« Reply #12 on: October 08, 2013, 09:31:02 PM »
24-105. Never have to change lenses.

AprilForever

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Re: Havasupai Falls
« Reply #13 on: October 10, 2013, 08:03:19 PM »
Im hiking down to Havasupai Falls in the Grand Canyon next week. I'm trying to limit how much I carry down with me. I'm trying to figure out what lenses to bring. I have Canon 5D MkIII. My lense choices are 17-40, 24-105. I also have 70-200 and 85 and 135 Prime. Any advice would be appreciated. I think I only want to take two of them.

Any other advice about the hike would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Dave

I hike at the GC this summer. The 17-40 and the 70-200 will be all you need. You may want the 24-105 on a second body or back up?
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