October 22, 2014, 10:14:40 AM

Author Topic: What exactly makes a good monitor for post processing/editing?  (Read 3923 times)

astevenscr

  • SX60 HS
  • **
  • Posts: 8
    • View Profile
Re: What exactly makes a good monitor for post processing/editing?
« Reply #15 on: November 06, 2013, 12:19:46 AM »
I'm interested to hear your opinions on the IPS monitors from Monoprice for editing purposes. I have been pleased with the 27" version for (non-photo) work purposes, and it's hard to beat the price on a high-resolution monitor with good customer support. Supposedly they use LG panels (similar to the Apple displays) and are a US distributor with a good returns policy vs taking a risk on the Korean ebay sellers. 

See http://www.monoprice.com/Search?keyword=ips
60d, 17-55mm 2.8, canon 100mm macro, canon 50mm 1.4, canon 70-200mm 2.8L

canon rumors FORUM

Re: What exactly makes a good monitor for post processing/editing?
« Reply #15 on: November 06, 2013, 12:19:46 AM »

tolusina

  • Canon 6D
  • *****
  • Posts: 394
    • View Profile
Re: What exactly makes a good monitor for post processing/editing?
« Reply #16 on: November 06, 2013, 12:52:40 AM »
I'm liking the look of this NEC panel...........
http://www.necdisplay.com/p/desktop-monitors/pa242w-bk-sv
Way pricier than the OP's stated budget, excellent reviews every where I've looked.
Saves it's calibration profile internally, not on your PC, can store up to five color profiles, can load printer ICC profiles for soft proofing prints, picture in picture, picture by picture, a bit more.
 
 
 
 
 
 .

40 on 6

pwp

  • 1D X
  • *******
  • Posts: 1606
    • View Profile
Re: What exactly makes a good monitor for post processing/editing?
« Reply #17 on: November 06, 2013, 02:46:02 AM »
In the studio I have two identically specced custom-built PC's. Two? Redundancy as much as anything else. When things go pear-shaped, I want to keep working in an instantly familiar, identical environment.

I do like a bit of screen real-estate. Each setup has a Dell U3011 (30inch) with a Dell 2007FP (20inch) rotated to vertical to the right of the Dell 30. The Dell 30 calibrates up nicely. I like the image I'm working on filling the screen, and the Tools, Palettes etc are all parked on the 20inch off to the side. The Dell 2007FP rotated to vertical is so close to the height of the 30inch it doesn't matter. It's 1200x1600 and the 30inch is 1600x2560 so its a smooth transition between the two. The 2007FP is a $100 eBay pickup just about any time (ex-office rentals usually). Color accuracy is irrelevant on the second monitor.

Color accuracy? Eizos and the like certainly are Gold Standard. But the stuff my clients reproduce looks just the same as it was on my monitor. For precision color accuracy requirement projects I use Color Checker Passport and just trust the numbers regardless of what direction the perceptual pressures may push me.

Zero street-cred Dells are not for snobs, but I've had them for years. My first 2405FPW which my son has been punishing for years blew a board last week; it was pretty much perfect for nine relentless years. Keep away from the cheapie Dells which may be fine for office work, and stay with any of the U-Series panels.

-pw

canon rumors FORUM

Re: What exactly makes a good monitor for post processing/editing?
« Reply #17 on: November 06, 2013, 02:46:02 AM »