July 28, 2014, 07:18:44 AM

Author Topic: The ultimate video recorder | 2500 USD Price range  (Read 3114 times)

sjschall

  • Canon AE-1
  • ***
  • Posts: 78
    • View Profile
Re: The ultimate video recorder | 2500 USD Price range
« Reply #15 on: November 01, 2013, 12:01:23 PM »
If you're in love with the visuals of the BMPCC, you should go that route. Just understand it's going to take a bit more effort in other areas (batteries, stabilization, crop, lenses....) The 70D is more ready to go out of the box, but it seems like you would be settling :)

canon rumors FORUM

Re: The ultimate video recorder | 2500 USD Price range
« Reply #15 on: November 01, 2013, 12:01:23 PM »

bluegreenturtle

  • Rebel SL1
  • ***
  • Posts: 90
    • View Profile
Re: The ultimate video recorder | 2500 USD Price range
« Reply #16 on: November 01, 2013, 01:10:42 PM »
Sigh.  There is no "best" overall - you have to tailor it to the kind of shooting you do.  It sounds like right now, you don't know, so buying the best will be of no benefit - most PAID video work has little to do with absolute best IQ.  I have a documentary production studio and do well into 6 figures of profit a year in video work - I could "afford" any video camera on the market, including something like an F55 or the like.  I choose to work with a 5DIII right now because it fits what I do, not because it's best.  I don't want slow setups, I don't want people gawking at me when I am working on the street, I just want to get my work done quickly and the DSLR does that, while providing me control over the image in a way I'm comfortable with. 

I look at my work just 3 years ago and now and it's worlds apart and it has nothing to do with the equipment I use - it's about understanding what I want to get and how to get it.  You sort of hit a pet peeve of mine (common in some of my clients) that they can "buy" their way into video work by having the right equipment.  I've watched documentaries that were shot on $500 handy cams that blow my work, shot with $25,000 worth of gear, out of the water - because they knew *exactly* what story they were trying to tell, how to tell it, and how to use their gear to the absolute best of its ability.  Get a camera you can afford (the suggestion of the 70D is a good one) and start shooting.  You'll start to figure out what works and what doesn't - then upgrade later.  I did more than $150,000 worth of work on a Canon 7D ($1300), secured another $200,000 worth of work based on that previous work, and sold the 7D for $1100.  Just get something and learn.

KO

  • SX50 HS
  • **
  • Posts: 7
    • View Profile
Re: The ultimate video recorder | 2500 USD Price range
« Reply #17 on: November 02, 2013, 02:43:41 AM »
Sigh.  There is no "best" overall - you have to tailor it to the kind of shooting you do.  It sounds like right now, you don't know, so buying the best will be of no benefit - most PAID video work has little to do with absolute best IQ.  I have a documentary production studio and do well into 6 figures of profit a year in video work - I could "afford" any video camera on the market, including something like an F55 or the like.  I choose to work with a 5DIII right now because it fits what I do, not because it's best.  I don't want slow setups, I don't want people gawking at me when I am working on the street, I just want to get my work done quickly and the DSLR does that, while providing me control over the image in a way I'm comfortable with. 

I look at my work just 3 years ago and now and it's worlds apart and it has nothing to do with the equipment I use - it's about understanding what I want to get and how to get it.  You sort of hit a pet peeve of mine (common in some of my clients) that they can "buy" their way into video work by having the right equipment.  I've watched documentaries that were shot on $500 handy cams that blow my work, shot with $25,000 worth of gear, out of the water - because they knew *exactly* what story they were trying to tell, how to tell it, and how to use their gear to the absolute best of its ability.  Get a camera you can afford (the suggestion of the 70D is a good one) and start shooting.  You'll start to figure out what works and what doesn't - then upgrade later.  I did more than $150,000 worth of work on a Canon 7D ($1300), secured another $200,000 worth of work based on that previous work, and sold the 7D for $1100.  Just get something and learn.

Thank you for knocking some common sense into me.
You're dammed right about those words, and i must say, that during the last year or two, my handycam has just been laying of on a shell. It cost me 700 bucks when i got it in 2011, but the picture quality bugged me so intensely that that was what i ended up want to fix the most, and therefor maybe "forget" about why i picked up a camera, or bought that handycam in the first place. To shoot something awesome for others and myself to enjoy. I have absolutely no experience what so ever when it comes to leneses, glass, what does that refer to? (quick google search: it's the lens right?).
But there is something that i love about video making. It's like a sunset and the sea, mount everest and the achievement and the icing on the cake for me.

I would sincerely like to thank you from the bottom of my heart for your outstainding response, and reminding me about the core reasons why i picked up filming in the first place.
I'll go with the 70d and upgrade later.

Btw, i'm interested in your work. Could you leave a link to your website here, or send it in a PM?
Best Regards,
And thank you all for your awesome responses people!!
Especially bluegreenturtle!
« Last Edit: November 02, 2013, 02:49:40 AM by KO »

canon rumors FORUM

Re: The ultimate video recorder | 2500 USD Price range
« Reply #17 on: November 02, 2013, 02:43:41 AM »