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Author Topic: How to teach a friend Photography...  (Read 5654 times)

jdramirez

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Re: How to teach a friend Photography...
« Reply #15 on: November 07, 2013, 07:06:09 PM »
 I'd try to  teach her depth  of field  first with a  fast prime  only adjusting the aperture.   then I  would move closer and further away from the subject and affect depth of field that way...  then finally I would  get a zoom with a constant aperture and change the focal length only...

 then I'd say...  go forth and learn to use a tripod.
Upgrade  path.->means the former was sold for the latter.

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Re: How to teach a friend Photography...
« Reply #15 on: November 07, 2013, 07:06:09 PM »

eml58

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Re: How to teach a friend Photography...
« Reply #16 on: November 07, 2013, 07:24:37 PM »
I'd say to send her to a local store offering classes (free or otherwise). I lecture a lot and do teach advanced studio photography, but I don't teach beginners. It'll keep your neighborly friendship, your own headaches down, and she'll be amongst her "peers" at the same level of knowledge so that they can bounce ideas off each other freely with the guidance of a structured method to learn.

As she gets more "advanced" and familiar with the craft, then you could always step in and give advice, critiques, etc. Once she has the basics down, then if you were to take her out on a shoot to work on something specific, i.e fill flash, composition, etc. it would be much easier.

Excellent advice, take it.

Remember always, "No good turn goes unpunished", you have a good relationship with your neighbour, getting in boots and all has the disadvantage of changing that relationship, that may not be what you want in the long run.

If you decide to go Boots and all, do it without charging, money will almost surely soar the relationship, almost always does.
The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing

K13X5C

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Re: How to teach a friend Photography...
« Reply #17 on: November 07, 2013, 08:20:31 PM »
Having been there and done that, I'd suggest that you have her choose a style of photography that she knows she will be involved in. For example, a Mom will be taking photos of her kids, so teaching her shutter speeds, aperture, DOF and such, within that context, should make it easier to learn, retain and practice the lessons. Give her a solid foundation in her chosen style and then later on, apply that knowledge to other styles such as landscapes, formal portraits, wildlife, street, etc. Jumping around from one style to another can be quite confusing and frustrating to someone just starting out.

Also, knowing her learning style beforehand will make things much easier on both of you. I learn best by reading first and then putting it into practice. She may do better listening, and/or watching, or... If she is a reader help her find a few great books or websites, if she is a viewer lead her to the best youtube.com videos. Thankfully photography is something for which there is an abundance of free, or nearly free, learning opportunities on the internet. She'll need something to refer to when you're not around, so pick a few sites for her to rely on.

Is she conversant in English ? Will language be a barrier for her ?


RustyTheGeek

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Re: How to teach a friend Photography...
« Reply #18 on: November 08, 2013, 11:23:37 AM »
I'd try to  teach her depth  of field  first with a  fast prime  only adjusting the aperture.   then I  would move closer and further away from the subject and affect depth of field that way...  then finally I would  get a zoom with a constant aperture and change the focal length only...

 then I'd say...  go forth and learn to use a tripod.

Great advice, Thanks!
Yes, but what would  surapon  say ??  :D

RustyTheGeek

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Re: How to teach a friend Photography...
« Reply #19 on: November 08, 2013, 11:29:22 AM »
I'd say to send her to a local store offering classes (free or otherwise). I lecture a lot and do teach advanced studio photography, but I don't teach beginners. It'll keep your neighborly friendship, your own headaches down, and she'll be amongst her "peers" at the same level of knowledge so that they can bounce ideas off each other freely with the guidance of a structured method to learn.

As she gets more "advanced" and familiar with the craft, then you could always step in and give advice, critiques, etc. Once she has the basics down, then if you were to take her out on a shoot to work on something specific, i.e fill flash, composition, etc. it would be much easier.

Excellent advice, take it.

Remember always, "No good turn goes unpunished", you have a good relationship with your neighbour, getting in boots and all has the disadvantage of changing that relationship, that may not be what you want in the long run.

If you decide to go Boots and all, do it without charging, money will almost surely soar the relationship, almost always does.

Wow, I wish I had a nickel for every time I said, "No good turn goes unpunished."  I totally understand!  I appreciate the concern and I plan to tread lightly and spend most of my time listening and letting her come to me.  I won't be surprised if after a month or so she loses interest.  If so, fine.  If the opposite happens, I'll take it slow and try to observe how much she learns on her own to gauge her true commitment.  That's why I want to loan her a DSLR for a bit and let the infatuation wear off and see if she is still into it.

Funny how much talking about beginning a photography hobby sounds like some kind of serious relationship, eh?
Yes, but what would  surapon  say ??  :D

alexanderferdinand

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Re: How to teach a friend Photography...
« Reply #20 on: November 08, 2013, 11:37:50 AM »
If she is interested (and this is valid for every craft or hobby) I would offer her to take a look at her results.
She then shoots, what she likes and you can offer her some hints how to make it different, better, or what gear would help.
To learn about basics like aperture or shutterspeed: same. She can choose a book or a class.
I would do it laissez-fair.
If someone is interested in something, he will talk about it.
So for you.
Have fun!

RustyTheGeek

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Re: How to teach a friend Photography...
« Reply #21 on: November 08, 2013, 01:57:38 PM »
Thanks Alex!  Yeah, I'll see how it goes.

I guess at some point I should learn something about photography myself and stop faking it like I've been doing for the past few years.  Know what I mean, LOL?!  I mean, should I teach her how to get it right in camera or just teach how to fix it in post???   ;D  After some shoots, I look at my pictures and I wonder if I know anything at all!!  Thank God for the occasional picture that I'm actually proud of!!
Yes, but what would  surapon  say ??  :D

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Re: How to teach a friend Photography...
« Reply #21 on: November 08, 2013, 01:57:38 PM »

jdramirez

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Re: How to teach a friend Photography...
« Reply #22 on: November 08, 2013, 02:45:07 PM »
Thanks Alex!  Yeah, I'll see how it goes.

I guess at some point I should learn something about photography myself and stop faking it like I've been doing for the past few years.  Know what I mean, LOL?!  I mean, should I teach her how to get it right in camera or just teach how to fix it in post???   ;D  After some shoots, I look at my pictures and I wonder if I know anything at all!!  Thank God for the occasional picture that I'm actually proud of!!

 photography is like love making,  the  bigger the lens,  the less you have to do.

 ok,  it's nothing like that... I  just wanted to be crass.
Upgrade  path.->means the former was sold for the latter.

XS->60D->5d Mkiii:18-55->24-105L:75-300->55-250->70-300->70-200 f4L USM->70-200 f/2.8L USM->70-200 f/2.8L IS Mkii:50 f/1.8->50 f/1.4->100L->85mm f/1.8 USM-> 8mm ->100L & 85L

Jay Khaos

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Re: How to teach a friend Photography...
« Reply #23 on: November 08, 2013, 03:11:06 PM »
I'd say to send her to a local store offering classes (free or otherwise). I lecture a lot and do teach advanced studio photography, but I don't teach beginners. It'll keep your neighborly friendship, your own headaches down, and she'll be amongst her "peers" at the same level of knowledge so that they can bounce ideas off each other freely with the guidance of a structured method to learn.

As she gets more "advanced" and familiar with the craft, then you could always step in and give advice, critiques, etc. Once she has the basics down, then if you were to take her out on a shoot to work on something specific, i.e fill flash, composition, etc. it would be much easier.

Excellent advice, take it.

Remember always, "No good turn goes unpunished", you have a good relationship with your neighbour, getting in boots and all has the disadvantage of changing that relationship, that may not be what you want in the long run.

If you decide to go Boots and all, do it without charging, money will almost surely soar the relationship, almost always does.


I want to dislike this advice, because I dont like to think that it's true.... but I have to agree, because it always proves to be (in my experience).  The thing about letting flickr/family/friend compliments get to their head is the most discouraging thing... In my experience it hasn't been worth it and it always becomes hostile, or just ends with no results at best.

My theory is that, if someone is motivated to actually learn to take great photos, they can and will do it on their own (internet, books, etc).  More often the case however: they see the notoriety you are gaining amongst mutual friends or family, doing something that is seemingly all fun and games, and of course that's appealing—not necessarily motivated by the artistic aspect of it.  Definitely not accusing your neighbor of being in that category, but in my experience, the latter description fits the type of person that approaches me for help.  They want the internet popularity and compliments, not a respectable final product or the path that it takes to get there.

I mean, if I were to have my brain wiped of all photography knowledge and made to start again, I would RATHER be left on my own to research and learn at least at first... even if I had access to a world-class teacher.  If I didn't even have the motivation and patience for that, what good would I be in the hands of a pro anyway?
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jdramirez

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Re: How to teach a friend Photography...
« Reply #24 on: November 08, 2013, 03:54:36 PM »
I want to dislike this advice, because I dont like to think that it's true.... but I have to agree, because it always proves to be (in my experience).  The thing about letting flickr/family/friend compliments get to their head is the most discouraging thing... In my experience it hasn't been worth it and it always becomes hostile, or just ends with no results at best.

My theory is that, if someone is motivated to actually learn to take great photos, they can and will do it on their own (internet, books, etc).  More often the case however: they see the notoriety you are gaining amongst mutual friends or family, doing something that is seemingly all fun and games, and of course that's appealing—not necessarily motivated by the artistic aspect of it.  Definitely not accusing your neighbor of being in that category, but in my experience, the latter description fits the type of person that approaches me for help.  They want the internet popularity and compliments, not a respectable final product or the path that it takes to get there.

I mean, if I were to have my brain wiped of all photography knowledge and made to start again, I would RATHER be left on my own to research and learn at least at first... even if I had access to a world-class teacher.  If I didn't even have the motivation and patience for that, what good would I be in the hands of a pro anyway?

I  know my mind is always in the gutter,  but I think of knocking boots...  which is what I'm guessing isn't what you are sagging.   though that to can ruin a relationship...  but out of all the ways to ruin a friendship,  it's my favorite.

 as for doing it all over again...  wow... I  was  just so green and naive and I still did a reasonable job with what I had...  from changing angles to  focusing and timing...  ugh.   it would be so awful.
Upgrade  path.->means the former was sold for the latter.

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mkabi

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Re: How to teach a friend Photography...
« Reply #25 on: November 08, 2013, 07:33:00 PM »
I dont' know if someone has already mentioned this... but tell her to learn it through YouTube.
I'm not advocating by it, but I have learned a lot from YouTube myself, never had to consult a professional photographer or videographer (well, not often) and its a good reference.
 
First, tell her to find out how to use the various buttons and knobs through YouTube. There are so many videos and they are based on the individual bodies.

Then to figure out different techniques through YouTube. And, if there is something that is confusing that YouTube can't answer, you step in.

Sometimes... not everyone is meant to be a teacher... you may lose patience with the learner. You may be going too fast... or too slow...you can always play, stop and rewind a YouTube video.
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RustyTheGeek

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Re: How to teach a friend Photography...
« Reply #26 on: November 10, 2013, 11:40:21 PM »
Thanks again for all of the input.  I'm aware that things could become awkward or affect our neighborly relationship.  I will not only be up front with how I want to keep things cordial but also what I expect for her to gain or not.  As for knocking boots, well LOL!!  (I honestly thought about that too.  It's just a fact of life.)  That's extremely unlikely unless there is a side of her I know nothing about!  She's not really my type unless again, there is a side I know nothing about.

Anyway, keep the advice coming.  I appreciate it!
Yes, but what would  surapon  say ??  :D

RustyTheGeek

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Re: How to teach a friend Photography...
« Reply #27 on: November 11, 2013, 10:55:27 AM »
Thanks Alex!  Yeah, I'll see how it goes.

I guess at some point I should learn something about photography myself and stop faking it like I've been doing for the past few years.  Know what I mean, LOL?!  I mean, should I teach her how to get it right in camera or just teach how to fix it in post???   ;D  After some shoots, I look at my pictures and I wonder if I know anything at all!!  Thank God for the occasional picture that I'm actually proud of!!

 photography is like love making,  the  bigger the lens,  the less you have to do.

 ok,  it's nothing like that... I  just wanted to be crass.

That's OK, I sometimes think my mind pretty much lives in the gutter.  Probably like most men.  (And some women!)  It's pretty hard to offend me, esp when it comes to innuendo related to women.

Big, high performance lenses are in big demand but elusive to get to hold and use.  So of course they are what every photographer, male or female, prefers when given a choice.  It's just the way things are, right?
Yes, but what would  surapon  say ??  :D

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Re: How to teach a friend Photography...
« Reply #27 on: November 11, 2013, 10:55:27 AM »

drolo61

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Re: How to teach a friend Photography...
« Reply #28 on: November 11, 2013, 11:27:44 AM »
Especially the scarpbook suggestion is great.
No much to ad, but one thing that helped me get into it back in the film days.

I would start her on the 5Dc with, if you can spare it, a relatively fast normal range prime (say 50, 1,4).
Explain in simple terms the way to manipulate the amount of light in manual (f-stop, speed, iso).
Put the camera in all manual and off she goes.

It may be a little bit rough, but it will help her to discover the basics quickly (as she can always go for direct feedback and look at what she did after each shot). Zooming you can do using your feet, the fast prime allows her to discover and explore DOF.

Sharing progress in choosen intervals will help, and if you can afford a couple of hours, try to agree on a "project topic" that both of you cover usinf equivalent equipment. Not to show of, but to share different views to the same general idea.

Has become more than a bit, but here you go.

Mind to share the outcome of your project (if it stars)?
Have a great day
Olaf
« Last Edit: November 11, 2013, 11:29:20 AM by drolo61 »
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RustyTheGeek

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Re: How to teach a friend Photography...
« Reply #29 on: November 11, 2013, 01:03:17 PM »
Especially the scarpbook suggestion is great.
No much to ad, but one thing that helped me get into it back in the film days.

I would start her on the 5Dc with, if you can spare it, a relatively fast normal range prime (say 50, 1,4).
Explain in simple terms the way to manipulate the amount of light in manual (f-stop, speed, iso).
Put the camera in all manual and off she goes.

It may be a little bit rough, but it will help her to discover the basics quickly (as she can always go for direct feedback and look at what she did after each shot). Zooming you can do using your feet, the fast prime allows her to discover and explore DOF.

Sharing progress in choosen intervals will help, and if you can afford a couple of hours, try to agree on a "project topic" that both of you cover usinf equivalent equipment. Not to show of, but to share different views to the same general idea.

Has become more than a bit, but here you go.

Mind to share the outcome of your project (if it stars)?
Have a great day
Olaf

Yeah, this is similar to what I was thinking.  Perhaps let her get used to the camera in P mode and then quickly push for her to experiment with M and do some exercises with varying shutter, aperture and ISO so she understands the exposure triangle and how changing each aspect affects the picture Blur, DOF and Noise.

I think starting with a prime is good so it forces her to think more and then later she will appreciate what the zoom does for her.  I also prefer the 5Dc with either a 50mm or a 28mm.  IMO, the 28 is a bit more forgiving.

As for books, I'll likely give her one or two from Kelby or Peterson to start off.  There's also an easy read from Joel Sartore about photographing family that I think is a good start.  I will also encourage her to start looking at as many photographs as possible online or otherwise to see what she likes about them and start considering how they were made.

Using YouTube, etc are great ideas as long as she understands what she is learning and is comfortable with using the Internet a lot.  I'm not sure about that.  It also depends on how much time she has to dedicate to this venture.  I honestly hope I can sell her a few things to start out with like I started out myself with my 'mentor' friend.  Sort of a win/win.
Yes, but what would  surapon  say ??  :D

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Re: How to teach a friend Photography...
« Reply #29 on: November 11, 2013, 01:03:17 PM »