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Author Topic: How to teach a friend Photography...  (Read 4375 times)

johnf3f

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Re: How to teach a friend Photography...
« Reply #30 on: November 12, 2013, 06:13:55 PM »
DON'T DO IT!
I got involved in teaching a lady to use DSLR cameras, now she is a better photographer than me and keeps borrowing my lenses!

We got her started with borrowed gear then she bought some of our older gear (at very low prices) and within a year started to leave us behind!

You can really go off people!

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Re: How to teach a friend Photography...
« Reply #30 on: November 12, 2013, 06:13:55 PM »

alexanderferdinand

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Re: How to teach a friend Photography...
« Reply #31 on: November 12, 2013, 06:26:53 PM »
Dear Rusty!

Yes, teaching someone is strange. You yourself as a teacher will learn a lot.
(And sometimes this process leads to a nice collaboration.)
As I told you: if youre not getting paid for this, let the pupil come to you at free will.

Again: have fun!

RustyTheGeek

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Re: How to teach a friend Photography...
« Reply #32 on: November 12, 2013, 11:52:40 PM »
DON'T DO IT!
I got involved in teaching a lady to use DSLR cameras, now she is a better photographer than me and keeps borrowing my lenses!

We got her started with borrowed gear then she bought some of our older gear (at very low prices) and within a year started to leave us behind!

You can really go off people!

LOL!  Yeah, that would be ironic, eh?  In this case, I'm not a pro and wouldn't lose a penny.  In fact, it would be great if she became as good or hopefully better than me because that would not only make me a great teacher but I might actually end up in a few pictures for a change in our scout troop.  You know the drill - as the photographer you're never present at any of the events... at least not by looking at the photos!  :-)
Yes, but what would  surapon  say ??  :D

RustyTheGeek

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Re: How to teach a friend Photography...
« Reply #33 on: November 12, 2013, 11:55:28 PM »
Dear Rusty!

Yes, teaching someone is strange. You yourself as a teacher will learn a lot.
(And sometimes this process leads to a nice collaboration.)
As I told you: if youre not getting paid for this, let the pupil come to you at free will.

Again: have fun!

Ahh!  You got me.  Busted!  :)  This is the selfish part of me knowing that the more I teach things, the more I benefit from knowing the material better.  So I totally agree with you.  It's a great side benefit aside from the whole ego boost and all.  Thanks for the feedback!
Yes, but what would  surapon  say ??  :D

Kevin Paisley

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Re: How to teach a friend Photography...
« Reply #34 on: November 14, 2013, 08:11:38 AM »
I think this will be a fun thread.  I thought I would throw this out there and see what everyone thinks...

-  Neighbor wants to learn photography and wonders if I will teach her.
-  I'm an experienced technical instructor, just need to decide what will work for her.
-  Neighbor is a mom of foreign origin whose son is also in our scout troop.
-  She eventually wants to buy some good equipment and learn to take good images.

I have plenty of equipment similar to most of the CR gang.  My plan was to loan her a basic DSLR, (like a Rebel or a 30D) with a basic kit lens and flash along with a few good books and let her get her feet wet.  Then loan another camera (like a 5Dc or something different), different lens, maybe a prime and let her experiment some more.  Demonstrate the fact that she can get good pictures with any camera if she develops good technique, etc.  Along the way answering questions and then teach more later after she is more familiar with what to ask.

Cart before the horse or the chicken and the egg:  I think that many folks go out and buy a ton of gear, mess with it for a while and then get discouraged because it isn't what they expect.  It isn't that fulfilling.  My goal is to first see if she truly enjoys taking pictures before she invests in gear or gets turned off by trying to formally  "learn" photography.  Actually taking pictures is the most important part and often that is the part people learn they don't really prefer after all.  Or, by actually taking pictures one tends to be motivated to learn on their own why or why not a picture worked and get the spark, the itch to keep going.  One also starts to discover what kind of pictures they like to take and how they like to go about it.  How many of us have said that if they could have known some period of time earlier what they knew later, how they would change their initial purchases, etc.  By loaning her a camera for while, I hope to give her the ability to make a better purchase later that suits the style she develops.

So, what are the thoughts of CR members that have some experience with this scenario or teaching in general?  Keep in mind that I'm not new to teaching but since this isn't an official classroom type thing, I figure I would try another approach.  It's more of a private tutor kind of thing I guess.  The more good ideas I get here, the better!  Thanks.

Maybe you should hold a preliminary discussion on what she wants to get out of the lesson. Then you can decide if you are able to instruct her on a regular basis. You can find out what works best for her in the process of teaching. You need to take her feedback into consideration. It is important that both of you enjoy it. You should first establish that she is serious about photography, otherwise it is a waste of time and money.

Actionpix

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Re: How to teach a friend Photography...
« Reply #35 on: November 14, 2013, 08:53:58 AM »
I agree very much with the borrowing part. Did it myself couple of times. A lot of people come to me for advice on what to buy. First go find out if you are really into photography before throwing away money. And if someone has kids, make sure the kids are there, kids learn fast and can help when you are not there.

Dangou

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Re: How to teach a friend Photography...
« Reply #36 on: November 23, 2013, 12:49:42 AM »
Tell them to check out www.canonoutsideofauto.ca. It is an online app that will really help them to understand how settings on the camera will affect the photograph.

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Re: How to teach a friend Photography...
« Reply #36 on: November 23, 2013, 12:49:42 AM »

PhotographyDream

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Re: How to teach a friend Photography...
« Reply #37 on: December 04, 2013, 10:04:24 PM »
I started my photography experience 10-12 years ago. Here's my advice to beginners and intermediate photographers.

If you are starting out in photography as a hobby, my recommendation would be to just get any DSLR and not worry about which specific one to get. Just get something, anything, to get your started.

Work your way up as time progresses. I’m guessing that when you first got the desire to pursue photography,
your first question probably was “Okay, what camera should I get? Which one takes good pictures?”.

Let me make a bold statement here... I’ll even type it in bold: All DSLRs take good pictures. Asking “What camera should I get?” seems like the question to ask at first ... heck, I was asking the same exact thing when I started. However, I’ve learned that the camera is not as important as the knowledge used to operate it.
All experienced photographers realize this. The first camera you have just isn’t important.

What is important is just to get one, become very familiar with the fundamentals of photography, then discover
what you need in your next camera and upgrade to that when you are ready to progress.

Another thing you should know is that, in a big-picture context, all the different camera brands are basically
selling the same thing: cameras. Canon, Nikon, Sony, Pentax, Fuji, whatever. No brand has any magical powers when compared to another brand. The brand is unimportant and irrelevant in a big picture context. The photos that you capture are what matters, not what brand was used to capture them.

Once you actually start using a DSLR, you will start learning about photography concepts -- things like exposure, light, and composition -- and will naturally become more familiar with photography as a whole.

After you become more familiar with photography by using a particular camera, you will sooner or later become aware of its limitations and will then realize what camera has the specs and features you want to upgrade to next.

Disregarding camera specs, All DSLRs, no matter how inexpensive or expensive they may be, give you the
option to manually adjust the Aperture, Shutter Speed, ISO, White Balance, and Focus; your first priority should be to learn how to appropriately adjust these essential variables so you will know how to take a good picture no matter what camera you are using, no matter what situation you find yourself in.

Nothing else matters before mastering how to manipulate these variables. Knowing how to manipulate
composition, light, and subject matter is also very important, but those aren’t necessarily dependent on the camera technology you are using.

Technology is not really much of an issue any more. Basic entry level DSLRS of today are better and even less expensive when compared to the flagship models that were made 10 years prior. Everyone now has access to usable equipment. The barrier to take good photos has never been as low as it is today. The main limiting factor is knowledge and experience, not “the best equipment”

When I started out in photography I came across this information that helped me save a lot of time and money. I learned the secrets to creating amazing photos from this site, I hope this will help you if you are serious about taking stunning photos.

David Barns
Christchurch
http://PhotographyMadeEasy.net

Don Haines

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Re: How to teach a friend Photography...
« Reply #38 on: December 04, 2013, 10:13:55 PM »
DON'T DO IT!
I got involved in teaching a lady to use DSLR cameras, now she is a better photographer than me and keeps borrowing my lenses!

We got her started with borrowed gear then she bought some of our older gear (at very low prices) and within a year started to leave us behind!

You can really go off people!
LOL!  Yeah, that would be ironic, eh?  In this case, I'm not a pro and wouldn't lose a penny.  In fact, it would be great if she became as good or hopefully better than me because that would not only make me a great teacher but I might actually end up in a few pictures for a change in our scout troop.  You know the drill - as the photographer you're never present at any of the events... at least not by looking at the photos!  :-)
The true mark of a good teacher is that they can teach someone to be better than themselves...
« Last Edit: December 04, 2013, 11:10:14 PM by Don Haines »
The best camera is the one in your hands

davf

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Re: How to teach a friend Photography...
« Reply #39 on: December 12, 2013, 06:18:38 AM »
As a teacher I find that one of the beauties of teaching is when the student has learned all they want to learn from you and moves on. Perhaps you know more than they do, but their path will eventually leave yours as they search for  whatever else they need to know and wherever else they need to go.

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Re: How to teach a friend Photography...
« Reply #39 on: December 12, 2013, 06:18:38 AM »