August 27, 2014, 11:08:06 AM

Author Topic: F1 Photography Advice  (Read 19553 times)

V8Beast

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Re: F1 Photography Advice
« Reply #135 on: May 04, 2014, 08:54:21 PM »
The wombat is back! Terrific shots, mate! On a side note, I hope these new cars sound better in person than they do on TV!

And yes, for capturing pan blurs of cars going around a track, the 5D3's AF is utterly amazing. Just to amuse myself, I played around with the auto 61-point selection instead of zone AF on the autocross yesterday. To my surprise, it worked just as well if not better than in zone AF mode. What a machine. Whenever the 5D4 comes out, unless it offers some substantial improvements, I think I might skip the next generation of the 5D series and stick with my Mark 3.

Graphix501

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Re: F1 Photography Advice
« Reply #136 on: May 24, 2014, 11:47:15 AM »
First time posting here, got a few from last year at Silverstone as the 2014 circus hasn't quite got round to the UK yet...


All from general spectator areas with a 5Diii shooting through the fence with 400mm f5.6 (sometimes with old sigma 1.4x) at the GP or following young driver test...


Susie Wolff by Fireproof Creative, on Flickr


Rosberg by Fireproof Creative, on Flickr

Sebastian Vettel 2013 by Fireproof Creative, on Flickr

Felipe Massa by Fireproof Creative, on Flickr

Pic by Fireproof Creative, on Flickr

Daniil Kvyat by Fireproof Creative, on Flickr

My advice, as others have also said... Friday and Saturday are your best chance for freedom of movement....make sure you use it, don't camp out.

Also don't just focus on shooting from stands, although you may get clear of the catch fence you are also blighted with the dull prospect of shooting down on cars against grey tarmac (at the majority of circuits). Get down to the fence and use DOF to just shoot through it, you will get much better angles.

Despite what other people have said, I've found letting the camera make decisions for you is asking for trouble... manual selection, single point with expansion & ai servo in my experience does the best job.

Invest in a monopod to help your panning and stability, also works in retracted form when sitting in the stands so you have more control, unless you intend for photojournalistic shots, don't use a shutterspeed above about 1/400, you want at least a little blur in those wheels, if possible try and get under 1/100 to get the most impressive results (but be prepared to bin a lot)

Finally don't be too put off by all the folks with massive white lenses and premium bodies, the equipment helps but doest make a great image on its own. Older bodies with shorter lenses can still deliver decent images if you use your feet and eyes to seek out spots.

Canon 40D with a Sigma 100-300 F4 from the stands under heavy clouds


Sunday, enjoy the race :)




V8Beast

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Re: F1 Photography Advice
« Reply #137 on: May 26, 2014, 02:23:29 PM »
First time posting here, got a few from last year at Silverstone as the 2014 circus hasn't quite got round to the UK yet...


All from general spectator areas with a 5Diii shooting through the fence with 400mm f5.6 (sometimes with old sigma 1.4x) at the GP or following young driver test...


Sunday, enjoy the race :)

Great shots! Last year's cars look so much better!

dhr90

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Re: F1 Photography Advice
« Reply #138 on: June 13, 2014, 02:33:42 PM »
First time posting here, got a few from last year at Silverstone as the 2014 circus hasn't quite got round to the UK yet...


All from general spectator areas with a 5Diii shooting through the fence with 400mm f5.6 (sometimes with old sigma 1.4x) at the GP or following young driver test...

My advice, as others have also said... Friday and Saturday are your best chance for freedom of movement....make sure you use it, don't camp out.

Also don't just focus on shooting from stands, although you may get clear of the catch fence you are also blighted with the dull prospect of shooting down on cars against grey tarmac (at the majority of circuits). Get down to the fence and use DOF to just shoot through it, you will get much better angles.

Despite what other people have said, I've found letting the camera make decisions for you is asking for trouble... manual selection, single point with expansion & ai servo in my experience does the best job.

Invest in a monopod to help your panning and stability, also works in retracted form when sitting in the stands so you have more control, unless you intend for photojournalistic shots, don't use a shutterspeed above about 1/400, you want at least a little blur in those wheels, if possible try and get under 1/100 to get the most impressive results (but be prepared to bin a lot)

Finally don't be too put off by all the folks with massive white lenses and premium bodies, the equipment helps but doest make a great image on its own. Older bodies with shorter lenses can still deliver decent images if you use your feet and eyes to seek out spots.

Sunday, enjoy the race :)

Good shots there.

I can't attend the GP, but tempted to do the test on the wednesday this year, its just a shame that unless a lot of people turn up they won't allow spectators around the whole of the circuit which is putting me off the 3 hour drive each way.
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Re: F1 Photography Advice
« Reply #139 on: June 13, 2014, 03:06:20 PM »
First time posting here, got a few from last year at Silverstone as the 2014 circus hasn't quite got round to the UK yet...


Great shots.  8)  Welcome to cr

IMG_0001

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Re: F1 Photography Advice
« Reply #140 on: June 13, 2014, 03:52:56 PM »
First time posting here...

Nice images indeed, some are pretty dynamic.
What a mess, my camera's sensor is full of massless particules that keep on trying to behave like waves!