September 21, 2014, 02:15:06 AM

Author Topic: F1 Photography Advice  (Read 20140 times)

V8Beast

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Re: F1 Photography Advice
« Reply #60 on: November 19, 2013, 11:27:11 PM »
Guess I can throw in my own $0.02 worth...  I am an engineer by trade and I still don't get why soooo many people around the world LOVE F1.  I appreciate and love the tech, but I have to think that 99% of the world does not.


I'll throw out some theories, most of which are probably wrong :) Traction control, stability control, launch control, active suspension dampers, carbon brakes, anti-block brakes, sequential transmissions, electronic differentials, and drive-by-wire throttle (just to name a few) were all pioneered in Formula One 10 or more years before they ever saw the light of day in a passenger car. When you see an F1 car zoom by, you're literally looking at the future. Surely any engineer can appreciate that :)

For the 99% percent of the world you mention (probably more like 90% of the world, since F1's 600 million viewership represents almost 10% of the world population), I think a lot of it has to do with mystique. Here in America, cars are commodities more than they are luxuries. Plus, the average Joe can watch or participate in all kinds of motorsports ranging from drag racing to road racing to autocross to short-track racing to rallying to drifting to karting. If you live in a country where most people take public transportation, and very few people have the luxury of watching or participating in motor racing, watching F1 on TV is as good as it gets. 

Quote
Once Vettel took pole position it might as well have been over.  He easily led the race and even set fast lap right at the end, as if to say he could have won it by more.

Very true. Any time one team or one driver dominates like Red Bull and Vettel have this season, the racing can become very boring. That said, many seasons are dog fights right down to the very last race, and these are the memories F1 fans live for, whether it's Schumacher barely edging out Hakkinen for the championship in 2000 at Indy, or a 24-year-old Fernando Alonso beating the 7-time World Champion in Schumacher at the second to last race of the season in 2006. Going into the last race of 2007, no one expected Raikkonen to win the championship, but he did. The same goes for Vettel in 2010.   

Quote
Sitting at one spot waiting for the long train of cars just got old.  They all did the same thing and drove by.  I think I got a better sense of the driving by watching how they setup for the different corners.

In the end the weekend itself was fun.  Austin is a GREAT town to hang out in and check out the scene.  The track is immense and offers a lot of visual activities.  But the actual race?  Maybe I just don't get it...

For an F1 nut, there's plenty to enjoy even in a not-so-interesting race in which Vettel dominated. As an amateur racer, I marveled at how late the cars hit the brakes approaching Turn 1. They're going nearly 200 mph at the end of the straight, and they don't hit the brakes until after the 100 meter marker. Incredible. I then marvel at the physical fitness required to endure 5 g's under braking for 1.5 hours without passing out. I race a 125cc shifter kart, which pulls 2.5 - 3 g's, and my neck muscles and ribs are sore after 30 minutes!

Despite the fact that Turn 1 has a blind entry, the drivers hit the apex of the corner perfectly- down to an inch or two - lap after lap. As an amateur who'd be lucky to hit the apex 1 out of 20 laps, I was awestruck to see that caliber of driving skill and precision.

I also witnessesed firsthand one of the reasons why the Red Bulls are so much faster than the rest of the field. I was very surprised how much earlier the Red Bulls were able to hit the gas and put the power down coming out of Turn 1 compared to every other car in the field. In fact, Webber seemed to get back on throttle even earlier than Vettel. Multiply that advantage over a dozen-plus corners, and it really adds up at the end of a lap and at the end of a race.

I'm hoping that the major rules changes in 2014 will help end the Red Bull domination, and make for some more interesting racing. The last big rules change was in 2009, and all that happened that season was an unknown, under-funded team (Brawn GP), with an underachieving driver (Jenson Button) went on to topple the Ferrari and McLaren empires. Great stuff :) 

Plus, there's the fact that you're watching the world's greatest drivers racing on the world's greatest tracks in the world's fastest, most technologically advanced cars.

That's why I love F1 ;D
« Last Edit: November 19, 2013, 11:44:18 PM by V8Beast »

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Re: F1 Photography Advice
« Reply #60 on: November 19, 2013, 11:27:11 PM »

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Re: F1 Photography Advice
« Reply #61 on: November 20, 2013, 01:18:12 AM »
Guess I can throw in my own $0.02 worth...  I am an engineer by trade and I still don't get why soooo many people around the world LOVE F1.  I appreciate and love the tech, but I have to think that 99% of the world does not.


I'll throw out some theories, most of which are probably wrong :) Traction control, stability control, launch control, active suspension dampers, carbon brakes, anti-block brakes, sequential transmissions, electronic differentials, and drive-by-wire throttle (just to name a few) were all pioneered in Formula One 10 or more years before they ever saw the light of day in a passenger car. When you see an F1 car zoom by, you're literally looking at the future. Surely any engineer can appreciate that :)

For the 99% percent of the world you mention (probably more like 90% of the world, since F1's 600 million viewership represents almost 10% of the world population), I think a lot of it has to do with mystique. Here in America, cars are commodities more than they are luxuries. Plus, the average Joe can watch or participate in all kinds of motorsports ranging from drag racing to road racing to autocross to short-track racing to rallying to drifting to karting. If you live in a country where most people take public transportation, and very few people have the luxury of watching or participating in motor racing, watching F1 on TV is as good as it gets. 

Quote
Once Vettel took pole position it might as well have been over.  He easily led the race and even set fast lap right at the end, as if to say he could have won it by more.

Very true. Any time one team or one driver dominates like Red Bull and Vettel have this season, the racing can become very boring. That said, many seasons are dog fights right down to the very last race, and these are the memories F1 fans live for, whether it's Schumacher barely edging out Hakkinen for the championship in 2000 at Indy, or a 24-year-old Fernando Alonso beating the 7-time World Champion in Schumacher at the second to last race of the season in 2006. Going into the last race of 2007, no one expected Raikkonen to win the championship, but he did. The same goes for Vettel in 2010.   

Quote
Sitting at one spot waiting for the long train of cars just got old.  They all did the same thing and drove by.  I think I got a better sense of the driving by watching how they setup for the different corners.

In the end the weekend itself was fun.  Austin is a GREAT town to hang out in and check out the scene.  The track is immense and offers a lot of visual activities.  But the actual race?  Maybe I just don't get it...

For an F1 nut, there's plenty to enjoy even in a not-so-interesting race in which Vettel dominated. As an amateur racer, I marveled at how late the cars hit the brakes approaching Turn 1. They're going nearly 200 mph at the end of the straight, and they don't hit the brakes until after the 100 meter marker. Incredible. I then marvel at the physical fitness required to endure 5 g's under braking for 1.5 hours without passing out. I race a 125cc shifter kart, which pulls 2.5 - 3 g's, and my neck muscles and ribs are sore after 30 minutes!

Despite the fact that Turn 1 has a blind entry, the drivers hit the apex of the corner perfectly- down to an inch or two - lap after lap. As an amateur who'd be lucky to hit the apex 1 out of 20 laps, I was awestruck to see that caliber of driving skill and precision.

I also witnessesed firsthand one of the reasons why the Red Bulls are so much faster than the rest of the field. I was very surprised how much earlier the Red Bulls were able to hit the gas and put the power down coming out of Turn 1 compared to every other car in the field. In fact, Webber seemed to get back on throttle even earlier than Vettel. Multiply that advantage over a dozen-plus corners, and it really adds up at the end of a lap and at the end of a race.

I'm hoping that the major rules changes in 2014 will help end the Red Bull domination, and make for some more interesting racing. The last big rules change was in 2009, and all that happened that season was an unknown, under-funded team (Brawn GP), with an underachieving driver (Jenson Button) went on to topple the Ferrari and McLaren empires. Great stuff :) 

Plus, there's the fact that you're watching the world's greatest drivers racing on the world's greatest tracks in the world's fastest, most technologically advanced cars.

That's why I love F1 ;D
Well sadi. Did you mention the sound also?

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Re: F1 Photography Advice
« Reply #62 on: November 20, 2013, 03:06:33 AM »
Guess I can throw in my own $0.02 worth...  I am an engineer by trade and I still don't get why soooo many people around the world LOVE F1.  I appreciate and love the tech, but I have to think that 99% of the world does not.


When you see an F1 car zoom by, you're literally looking at the future. Surely any engineer can appreciate that :)

watching F1 on TV is as good as it gets. 

Quote
Once Vettel took pole position it might as well have been over.  He easily led the race and even set fast lap right at the end, as if to say he could have won it by more.

All cars get faster as they use more fuel, thats a fact of life, theres nothing really special about this.
Quote
Sitting at one spot waiting for the long train of cars just got old.  They all did the same thing and drove by.  I think I got a better sense of the driving by watching how they setup for the different corners.
In the end the weekend itself was fun.  Austin is a GREAT town to hang out in and check out the scene.  The track is immense and offers a lot of visual activities.  But the actual race?  Maybe I just don't get it...

For an F1 nut, there's plenty to enjoy even in a not-so-interesting race in which Vettel dominated. As an amateur racer, I marveled at how late the cars hit the brakes approaching Turn 1. They're going nearly 200 mph at the end of the straight, and they don't hit the brakes until after the 100 meter marker. Incredible. I then marvel at the physical fitness required to endure 5 g's under braking for 1.5 hours without passing out. I race a 125cc shifter kart, which pulls 2.5 - 3 g's, and my neck muscles and ribs are sore after 30 minutes!
Despite the fact that Turn 1 has a blind entry, the drivers hit the apex of the corner perfectly- down to an inch or two - lap after lap. As an amateur who'd be lucky to hit the apex 1 out of 20 laps, I was awestruck to see that caliber of driving skill and precision.
I'm hoping that the major rules changes in 2014 will help end the Red Bull domination, and make for some more interesting racing. The last big rules change was in 2009, and all that happened that season was an unknown, under-funded team (Brawn GP), with an underachieving driver (Jenson Button) went on to topple the Ferrari and McLaren empires. Great stuff :) 

Plus, there's the fact that you're watching the world's greatest drivers racing on the world's greatest tracks in the world's fastest, most technologically advanced cars.

That's why I love F1 ;D
Sir, I applaud you!!

This is a fantastic commentary V8Beast, I’m also an F1 fanatic, how can anyone say that the Austin race was boring!! Did anyone actually WATCH the race??  The Bottas/Guttierrez overtake manoeuvre on the outside exit at turn 2????  It was (in my opinion) one of thee defining passes of the season; it was truly edge of the seat stuff!  There was so many other small battles going on that it made for great entertainment, Maldonado sending Sutil in to the wall in lap 2, Button taking 10th with 4 laps to go & Perez holding 7th (yeah I’m a McLaren fanatic) and Alonso taking 5th from his bad start in 7th while not 100% match fit!!  Webber “hunting” Grosjean down all the way to the chequered flag! I’m exhausted just re-living it from memory!!

Let’s not forget that these guys are true athletes, they reckon that a 2 hour race is the equivalent of completing a full 26 mile marathon, and these guys do it 20 times a year.....plus 3 practice sessions and 1 qualifying session per race, so that’s 20 races, 60 practice sessions and potentially 60 qualifying sessions per 8 month season!!!!

I do, however; appreciate what Celltech said with regards to how much people actually know about the techy stuff (perhaps the figures quoted may not be perfectly accurate ), as I have sat in the stands for years and people have no clue what’s usually going on, I base this on the fact that I have always been surrounded by people asking basic questions and who cannot identify any of the drivers or even the teams, you’d be surprised how many “Tifosi” jump up waving their gigantic Ferrari flags when a Marussia goes whizzing by, it makes me chuckle every time.  :P

The statistics (for me) are what it’s all about, where else in sport does it cost $125 million to kit out 1 single garage with custom made spanners, tools and the like....now remember that each team has 2 cars!!!
I also love it at the end of the season when the media go into overdrive with rumours and stories of bad blood and un-sportsman like attitudes from the drivers/managers, the stories of corruption and personnel swapping sides to the enemy, I love it all.

Let’s hope that your right and the Red Bull domination does not continue, as it appears to send the less fanatical in to hibernation!

Additionally I’d like to add to my earlier comment in this thread by giving some further useful strategies, remember to take your own ear defenders, Monaco charged my wife 15 Euros as she left them in the hotel on the first day, they generally cost $1 in Ace hardware!  Buy the full three day pass, this way you can attend the pitlane walk on Fridays, and scout various locations and take as many photos as you wish without upsetting the fair weather fans view’s, they can get quite pissy!! This way you’ll have loads of images, considerably less stress from shouting at twats and you can relax during the race and concentrate on what’s going on.....plus you can grab some snaps if major drama happens in your location (as per my earlier photo of Maldonado in the wall at Tabac from Monaco this year), above all you’ll enjoy the whole experience more following these simple tips.

Overall, you’re either a fair weather fan, or an obsessive, there’s very little in between! I’ll let you guess which one I am  :o
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Re: F1 Photography Advice
« Reply #63 on: November 20, 2013, 07:47:22 AM »
...
 Actually I enjoyed taking the 50GB of pictures I took over three days, even if only a handfull are actually just good enough.

Exactly.

Having been there, done that, it is better to just go and watch the cars to around.

As I see there is a world between what we feel is worthwhile or enjoyable in photography and as you have made a strong demonstration of your constructive approach, I suggest we agree to disagree.

I'm with you on this one.  Those comments are less than constructive.  I've been to every F1 event in Melbourne since the first in 1996 and a few in Adelaide before that.  I've done grandstands and general admission, gone with and without a camera but these days I always prefer to take my own shots.     

If we left it to the pros we would learn nothing ourselves.  There's another reason we shouldn't always leave it to the pros - while they generally have access to the best locations, they don't shoot from our vantage points so we get a different perspective.

I shoot most of my track shots between Thursday and Saturday (Melbourne is a 4 day event) when there are less people around.  Sundays are better for crowd shots as quite a few go all out and dress up for the occasion. I only take the occasional shot during the race itself.

The OP may wish to check out the Sepang circuit seat viewer to assist with his advance scouting for shooting locations.  http://www.sepangcircuit.com.my/story/sepang-circuits-seat-viewer

One other thing for the OP that I don't think has been suggested yet - get an over ear headset radio and tune into the track coverage if they have it.

A pit lane walk is also a must early in the season as you should be able to get good shots of the different front wing elements the teams are evaluating.
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Re: F1 Photography Advice
« Reply #64 on: November 20, 2013, 11:00:12 AM »
Good calls V8Beast and TheJock, and I would need to add that quite a bit of nationalist rivalry goes on in the public minds, at least those minds who come from drivers and/or team home-places!

However, if there is nothing in between fairweather fans and obsessive fans, well I wonder where I stand. Although I deeply enjoy F1 both from a technical (all aspects were they cars, strategy or drivers) and a social standpoint, I find I struggle in keeping pace with the season... I often end up catching up on race recaps instead of being able to see the whole thing.



...
As I see there is a world between what we feel is worthwhile or enjoyable in photography and as you have made a strong demonstration of your constructive approach, I suggest we agree to disagree.

I'm with you on this one.  Those comments are less than constructive.  I've been to every F1 event in Melbourne since the first in 1996 and a few in Adelaide before that.  I've done grandstands and general admission, gone with and without a camera but these days I always prefer to take my own shots.     

If we left it to the pros we would learn nothing ourselves.  There's another reason we shouldn't always leave it to the pros - while they generally have access to the best locations, they don't shoot from our vantage points so we get a different perspective.

I shoot most of my track shots between Thursday and Saturday (Melbourne is a 4 day event) when there are less people around.  Sundays are better for crowd shots as quite a few go all out and dress up for the occasion. I only take the occasional shot during the race itself.

The OP may wish to check out the Sepang circuit seat viewer to assist with his advance scouting for shooting locations.  http://www.sepangcircuit.com.my/story/sepang-circuits-seat-viewer

One other thing for the OP that I don't think has been suggested yet - get an over ear headset radio and tune into the track coverage if they have it.

A pit lane walk is also a must early in the season as you should be able to get good shots of the different front wing elements the teams are evaluating.

Thanks and very good advices to the OP. Those noise-cancelling over ear headset radios are great. I was loaned a pair for a few minutes and they make following the race much easier. As for the seat-viewer, wow that is a nice tool also! Never saw one of those.

Here in Montreal, the pits are only open to the public on Thursday, but I have never been able to free myself and go there. That is a shame since there surely are some fun to have and great pics opportunity.

 
What a mess, my camera's sensor is full of massless particules that keep on trying to behave like waves!

V8Beast

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Re: F1 Photography Advice
« Reply #65 on: November 20, 2013, 11:10:11 AM »
I do, however; appreciate what Celltech said with regards to how much people actually know about the techy stuff (perhaps the figures quoted may not be perfectly accurate ), as I have sat in the stands for years and people have no clue what’s usually going on, I base this on the fact that I have always been surrounded by people asking basic questions and who cannot identify any of the drivers or even the teams, you’d be surprised how many “Tifosi” jump up waving their gigantic Ferrari flags when a Marussia goes whizzing by, it makes me chuckle every time.  :P

That's both funny and sad at the same time! Granted my experience attending races is very limited, but I was very surprised how knowledgeable the fans were at this year's USGP. Probably not so much regarding the technical aspect of the sport, but factoids like which driver won which race, how the constructor's points are tallied, who carries the broadcasting rights for F1 races in the U.K., which driver said what in interviews leading up to the race, etc. Perhaps the less knowledgeable fans just kept their mouths shut ;D?

It's also possible that my standards are quite low. If you want to experience low-functioning fans, all you have to do is talk to a NASCAR or a drag racing fan.

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Re: F1 Photography Advice
« Reply #66 on: November 21, 2013, 03:10:51 AM »
It's also possible that my standards are quite low. If you want to experience low-functioning fans, all you have to do is talk to a NASCAR or a drag racing fan.
I would love to get my mitts on a NASCAR race!!!, we have drag racing here in Abu Dhabi too, I will be attending this year as a spectator (no JCB for that event), but one of the most fun events I have had over here was the Aussie V8 Supercars last year, they were one of the support races at the F1, what a scream those guys are!!!  Their main recovery man was a typical Aussie, the comment of the weekend from him was (rather rude, so my apologies in advance) as he described the difference between being able to salvage a car that could potentially continue (so to be gentle) compared to pulling a wrecked car out the Armco wall, he said “F**K it, it’s F**ked”, made me laugh  ;D

I would love nothing more than to visit places like the US and Australia to witness their races first hand, I have an invite to go and marshal in Melbourne (need to do the CAMS registration) but I’m starting a new job in a month, so it’ll probably not happen next year  :-\ 
My next race is the 12 hours at Yas Marina in December, I think that a guy from my home town in Scotland is driving for an American Le Mans GT1 team (Starworks Motorsport) and may be participating, so that’ll be interesting.
Anyhoo, I’m conscious that I’m adding no value to the OP’er, but I’m delighted to chat away on this subject, cheers.  :-X
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Re: F1 Photography Advice
« Reply #66 on: November 21, 2013, 03:10:51 AM »

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Re: F1 Photography Advice
« Reply #67 on: November 21, 2013, 10:22:40 PM »
I went to the practice and qualifying sessions of this weekend’s F1 race in Austin at the Circuit of the Americas (COTA).  Representative photos can be found at http://www.pbase.com/lebthree/2013_austin_f1

The COTA web site indicated they had no restrictions on the size of detachable lenses.  So on Friday’s practice day I decided to bring my old manual focus Canon FD 800mm with Ed Mika’s adapter on my 5Diii.  I thought that trying to capture these high-speed cars with an 800mm on a monopod with no autofocus or image stabilization would be an exercise in futility, but I got some great shots.  Keeper rate was far south of 50%, but I am no pro and don’t have to get the shot.  It also helps that I live in Austin, so this is not a once in a lifetime opportunity that I don’t want to blow.

I also brought a friend’s 400mm 5.6 which I have used on the COTA track before for the motorcycle GP and it would be a great option.  I didn’t use it too much as I wanted to experiment with the 800mm.  The 400mm is obviously a more portable option than the 2 foot long and heavy 800mm.  However, next year I probably will just bring the 800 to practice day as it was just a lot of fun trying to manually focus and get the shot.  Pre-focusing on a spot worked the most reliably, but it was fun to try to also attempt to focus on the cars in random areas.

On Saturday, qualifying day, I decided to recover from my hernia from carrying around the 800 on Friday, and just brought my 5Diii and a 24-105.  I was sitting on the 23rd row at the straight following turn 15 so my line of sight to the cars was just above the top of the fence.  I tried my hand at 125/sec exposure pans to get motion blur and initially got a very low keeper rate.  I got better when I tried to focus in on one spot on the car and keep it in my center focus spot as the car flew by.  Needless to say, the photos on my Pbase account using the 24-105 are heavily cropped.

The bottom line for me was to have good quality lenses, even if they may lack such things as autofocus and image stabilization, be prepared to take a lot of photos to up your chances of keepers and, if you are going to have to do a lot of cropping, the more resolution your camera has the better.   











Nice job on those!

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Re: F1 Photography Advice
« Reply #68 on: November 21, 2013, 10:31:57 PM »
One thing that is both a plus and a minus (you may know this already):  2014 sees all new smaller V6 engines and chassis, with state of the art turbo charging that is all combined with electric motor assist/batteries (I don't like this part)...but it's possible the cars might be a bit quieter than the current V8's.  Obviously they won't be as quiet as normal "turbo" cars can be.

I just got back from the USGP, and I feel very fortunate that I got to hear the 2.4L naturally aspirated V-8s screaming away at 18,000 rpm one last time. While I appreciate the technology involved with next's year's turbo V-6s, the sound is much more subdued. Mercedes recently posted a sound clip of the 2014 V-6 running a simulated lap at Monza on the dyno:

2014: A lap with the new Mercedes-Benz V6!

Still a nice sound, but not nearly as visceral at the naturally aspirated V-8s.

Thanks for posting that.  What's really cool, is the sound of the "old" 3 liter V-10's that revved to 20,000 rpm.  Almost like if a Sith amplified the sound of a mosquito after it inhaled some helium and got sucked into a hypersonic wind tunnel !! 

I'm glad you got hear them.  Even though I haven't heard them in person, I've heard them a lot on my home theater.  All I can say is, I would always wear earplugs, even for the new turbo cars.  I might have liked to pull them out for a few seconds, but that would have been enough.  It's not that I don't love visceral machines, I just want to preserve my hearing as best I can.  I even wear earplugs when I ride my dirtbike and atv. 

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Re: F1 Photography Advice
« Reply #69 on: November 22, 2013, 11:27:10 AM »
As far as F1 sound goes, I've always been in deep love with 12 cylinders on the overruns... In 2010, vintage F1 ran as a sideshow at the Montreal GP and I just enjoyed the sound of the cars from the late sixties and seventies sooooo much!!!

And trying to relate the posts from the OP... Here are a few photos taken with the XSI and 70-300 IS USM. I used AV mode at the time so movement was frozen. Now I use M mode to force a slower shutter.

Ohhh those 312Bs...
What a mess, my camera's sensor is full of massless particules that keep on trying to behave like waves!

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Re: F1 Photography Advice
« Reply #70 on: November 22, 2013, 01:06:45 PM »
Nice job on those!

Thanks for the kind words.  I think I was as surprised as anyone when I was running the 800mm shots through lightroom that they came out as well as they did with this old manual focus FD lens.  I really need to thank Ed Mika for his FD adapter that brought this old 800 beast back to life.

« Last Edit: November 22, 2013, 04:40:22 PM by Lloyd »
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Re: F1 Photography Advice
« Reply #71 on: November 22, 2013, 02:24:38 PM »
Nice job on those!

Thanks for the kind words.  I think I was as surpised as anyone when I was running the 800mm shots through lightroom that they came out as well as they did with this old manual focus FD lens.  I really need to thank Ed Mika for his FD adapter that brought this old 800 beast back to life.



Now, if I was the OP, I would ditch the 70-200 idea and head straight to ebay for a FD mount super-tele and some of those adapters! Respect to those shooting motorsport in manual focus.
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Re: F1 Photography Advice
« Reply #72 on: November 26, 2013, 04:07:54 PM »
Some great advice in this thread, as well as some great shots taken by people modestly labeling themselves as amateurs :)

I took my 5D3, 24-105, and 70-300L to this year's USGP, but honestly I didn't take many images at all. Since this was the first F1 race I attending, I wanted to enjoy the event instead watching bits and pieces of the race through a viewfinder.

A few observations from COTA:

- I scoped out all the general admissions area, and you're either too far away from the track and/or shooting through the fence to get a good shot.
- At the sections of the track (Turns 7, 8, 11) that offers good vantage point that aren't obstructed by the fence, a 300mm lens isn't nearly long enough.
- If the fence if brightly lit, and you're several hundreds of feet away from it, the AF will focus on the fence no matter what. That was the situation from the general admissions area, half way up the hill in Turn 1, which is where I watched the race from. A good work around was opening up the aperture, manually focusing near the apex of the turn, and shooting the cars as they passed through that point. An even better work around is to just put the camera down and enjoy the race :) I saw lots of spectators so fixated on shooting that they had no idea what was going on during the race.
- As others suggested, do most of the shooting during practice and qualifying. Slaving away through a viewfinder is no way to enjoy the spectacle of F1 racing.

As an American, a Texan, and an Austinite, it's great to hear all the positive comments from the drivers regarding COTA, but I still think Spa is the best track on earth. Does anyone have pics from Spa they want to share :)? If I can only attend one other F1 race, I want to go to Spa!
I'm sorry, I don't have any pictures from Spa, but I agree with you it's the finest track of them all. It's the mother of all race tracks. Only really good drivers win here, remember Hakkinen's overtake on Schumi. He flew over the left cerb at Eau Rouge to set up the greatest overtake in F1 history.

What year was that?

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Re: F1 Photography Advice
« Reply #72 on: November 26, 2013, 04:07:54 PM »

CarlTN

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Re: F1 Photography Advice
« Reply #73 on: November 26, 2013, 04:31:57 PM »
Guess I can throw in my own $0.02 worth...  I am an engineer by trade and I still don't get why soooo many people around the world LOVE F1.  I appreciate and love the tech, but I have to think that 99% of the world does not.

Once Vettel took pole position it might as well have been over.  He easily led the race and even set fast lap right at the end, as if to say he could have won it by more.  I personally found the practice laps more exciting than the actual race.

For me, taking pictures at multiple corners actually helped make the race more interesting.  Sitting at one spot waiting for the long train of cars just got old.  They all did the same thing and drove by.  I think I got a better sense of the driving by watching how they setup for the different corners.

In the end the weekend itself was fun.  Austin is a GREAT town to hang out in and check out the scene.  The track is immense and offers a lot of visual activities.  But the actual race?  Maybe I just don't get it...

But I don't feel like I lost anything by taking pictures...

You're probably right in a way, a good percentage of F1 fans in the world, are kind of like Nascar fans.  All they care about are the drivers, not the cars.

However, to wonder why so many people in the world love F1 is not hard to grasp at all.  It's because the spectacle is like nothing else.  It's also the rich history of the race...and because the drivers are generally from all over the world, and especially all over Europe, where most of the tracks are.  It's also because no other road racing car of any kind can come close to their speed on a road race track.  It's simply the physics and resources involved that spell this out.  For example, did you know it takes them 6 months to manufacture each brake disc?

You should have asked your fellow race attendees why they liked it so much, because apparently the crowd attendance was a record high on race day at over 100k (I assume beating last year's inaugural race). 

I am not a fan of Bernie Ecclestone, however, and I feel he runs F1 in a very arbitrary way.  His tenure can't last forever, though.  If he's had an overall positive impact on the series, I don't know of it.  Maybe he's helped the manufacturers limit their cost at times, by limiting the amount of time they have to develop...but I have to think the manufacturers, are also generally not pleased with all of F1 management, especially with Bernie.

I am not a fan of Nascar, at all, heritage or not.  The cars are ugly, cumbersome, low in technology...and I'm not sure what the goals of the series are, other than to simply make money.  They certainly are not striking new ground technology wise, or speed wise.  Innovation and Nascar are almost mutually exclusive.  Most of the drivers seem very dimwitted to me...and I'm from the South!  I guess that might be feigned at times, for the entertainment value of seeing the obligatory hick race driver interviewed in various media, I don't know.  I understand people enjoying going to the races, but frankly there's better racing to watch.  Anyone who knows anything about driving cars, especially a sports car that can change directions and speed quickly (and not always go left, or not always go straight...ovals and dragsters)...should be in love with F1, it seems to me.  Even the "IZOD" Indycars are a pale imitation, whether or not their series predates F1 (which it does).

Since you're an engineer, hopefully you can see where I'm coming from a bit.  Sportscar racing, and F1, are the purist types of motorsports.  Everything else is watered down, or distilled to something less entertaining...at least to me.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2013, 04:35:03 PM by CarlTN »

V8Beast

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Re: F1 Photography Advice
« Reply #74 on: November 27, 2013, 11:10:57 PM »
I would love to get my mitts on a NASCAR race!!!, we have drag racing here in Abu Dhabi too, I will be attending this year as a spectator (no JCB for that event), but one of the most fun events I have had over here was the Aussie V8 Supercars last year, they were one of the support races at the F1, what a scream those guys are!!!  Their main recovery man was a typical Aussie, the comment of the weekend from him was (rather rude, so my apologies in advance) as he described the difference between being able to salvage a car that could potentially continue (so to be gentle) compared to pulling a wrecked car out the Armco wall, he said “F**K it, it’s F**ked”, made me laugh  ;D

Be careful what you wish for. Most people attending a NASCAR race are just looking for an excuse to get drunk in public on a Sunday morning. Drag racing fans are similar, but instead of waiting until 10 am to get drunk they're already drunk by 8 am  ;D

I'd love to soak of the car scene in the Middle East sometime. The sight of so many Ferraris, Lamboghinis, and Bugattis street racing is just nuts.

I also love me some V8 Supercars, and will make sure to attend the race in Austin next year. Ironically, the closest thing you can get to American Trans Am racing from the '60s is the Australian V8 Supercars series. Speaking of Australia, the Bathurst circuit is one of a true hidden gems of the racing world. What an epic track!

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Re: F1 Photography Advice
« Reply #74 on: November 27, 2013, 11:10:57 PM »