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Author Topic: Canon EOS 7D Mark II in 2014 [CR2]  (Read 38815 times)

Marsu42

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Re: Canon EOS 7D Mark II in 2014 [CR2]
« Reply #120 on: November 18, 2013, 12:53:38 PM »
but remember just based on size, a full frame sensor will always be roughly three times the cost to manufacture as a crop sensor

... now the one thing that would be really, really interesting how much in *absolute* $$$ a ff sensor costs - ff cameras aren't so expensive just because of the sensor, but because they add other expensive features (yes, even the 6d...) and have a price premium as they produce the best dslr iq.

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Re: Canon EOS 7D Mark II in 2014 [CR2]
« Reply #120 on: November 18, 2013, 12:53:38 PM »

ashmadux

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Re: Canon EOS 7D Mark II in 2014 [CR2]
« Reply #121 on: November 18, 2013, 01:52:19 PM »
My 2c

The 70d feels like a great camera in use. The plastic-ness was very off-putting at first handle- same like the 60d. Playing with it and taking sample images yesterday gave me a much better impression. I can only wonder at what the 7d 2 will be like- that's gotta be a killer.

Hmm- smaller things though will probably be the return of the spot Af mode?
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Re: Canon EOS 7D Mark II in 2014 [CR2]
« Reply #122 on: November 19, 2013, 03:10:28 AM »
I want APS-H sensors back!
Though I wouldn't be surprised if they increased the size of their projectors since 2006.
That's exactly it. I don't think the statements from 2006 still hold. At least, I hope...  ;)

dufflover

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Re: Canon EOS 7D Mark II in 2014 [CR2]
« Reply #123 on: November 19, 2013, 05:03:34 AM »
As much as I'd like a 7DII I'm starting to think realistically I'd end up with a 5DMark3 or my 7D + 60D sold/merged into a 70D (with the EOS-M as the new 2nd body).

It's not that I need a FF sensor but like many other CR members I'm sure, I'm a bit of a gear head, a tech head. I know I don't need it but I like my toys! Well, of the not-rich-not-poor variety where I can't go buying 1D-X bodies and Canon super-telephotos, but my friends all thought I had a FF camera LOL. Just because I look like that sort of person.
Hurry up Canon and do something with your sensors! :P

TrabimanUK

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Re: Canon EOS 7D Mark II in 2014 [CR2]
« Reply #124 on: November 19, 2013, 06:34:00 AM »
I want APS-H sensors back!

+1 - would make the 7DII a bit differnt and differentiate it from the 1D, 5D and xxD range.  Be a bit like ressurecting the 1D IV :)
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StudentOfLight

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Re: Canon EOS 7D Mark II in 2014 [CR2]
« Reply #125 on: November 19, 2013, 07:37:17 AM »
http://www.robgalbraith.com/images/canon_full-frame_cmos_white_paper.pdf
Thank for posting the link to the white paper. I see it was published in 2006... I don't know how much production processes might have changed since then. But it is very interesting reading none-the-less.

I'm not an electronics designer so I would appreciate some info with regards to the following questions:

1) Are sensors still being made on 8" silicon wafers? If larger diameter wafers are used then there could be a lower percentage wastage when larger sized sensors are manufactured, bringing it closer to the smaller sensors.

2) Is the silicon wafer the expensive raw material component in the manufacture or the sensor elements which (I assume) are deposited onto the wafers?

3) Why are these silicon wafers circular? If rectangular wafers could be used then there would be no inherent production wastage, only possible rejects.

These are honest questions, please don't bite my head off when answering.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2013, 07:46:34 AM by StudentOfLight »
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dufflover

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Hurry up Canon and do something with your sensors! :P

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Re: Canon EOS 7D Mark II in 2014 [CR2]
« Reply #126 on: November 19, 2013, 07:50:51 AM »

photonius

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Re: Canon EOS 7D Mark II in 2014 [CR2]
« Reply #127 on: November 19, 2013, 08:58:08 AM »
http://www.robgalbraith.com/images/canon_full-frame_cmos_white_paper.pdf
Thank for posting the link to the white paper. I see it was published in 2006... I don't know how much production processes might have changed since then. But it is very interesting reading none-the-less.

I'm not an electronics designer so I would appreciate some info with regards to the following questions:

1) Are sensors still being made on 8" silicon wafers? If larger diameter wafers are used then there could be a lower percentage wastage when larger sized sensors are manufactured, bringing it closer to the smaller sensors.

2) Is the silicon wafer the expensive raw material component in the manufacture or the sensor elements which (I assume) are deposited onto the wafers?

3) Why are these silicon wafers circular? If rectangular wafers could be used then there would be no inherent production wastage, only possible rejects.

These are honest questions, please don't bite my head off when answering.

1) There are larger sizes, but they require bigger machines to handle, and production of larger, flawless wafers is more difficult.
2) Silicon wafers have not gone down in price.   So, unlike a CPU in a computer, where you just make the individual transistors smaller to pack more CPU power into the same size (Moore's law),
the image sensors don't scale like that. Yes, you could pack smaller and smaller pixels into the same size (megapixel race), but that's not really where the limitations lie these days.

privatebydesign

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Re: Canon EOS 7D Mark II in 2014 [CR2]
« Reply #128 on: November 19, 2013, 09:09:58 AM »


3) Why are these silicon wafers circular? If rectangular wafers could be used then there would be no inherent production wastage, only possible rejects.


Because of the laws of centrifugal force.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Czochralski_process
Too often we lose sight of the fact that photography is about capturing light, if we have the ability to take control of that light then we grow exponentially as photographers. More often than not the image is not about lens speed, sensor size, MP's or AF, it is about the light.

StudentOfLight

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Re: Canon EOS 7D Mark II in 2014 [CR2]
« Reply #129 on: November 19, 2013, 10:27:34 AM »
Thanks for the links guys.
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TrabimanUK

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Re: Canon EOS 7D Mark II in 2014 [CR2]
« Reply #130 on: November 19, 2013, 10:34:31 AM »

Because of the laws of centrifugal force.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Czochralski_process

Sorry to be picky, but working with physics boffins sometimes rubs off.  Do you mean centripetal force?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centripetal_force

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unfocused

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Re: Canon EOS 7D Mark II in 2014 [CR2]
« Reply #131 on: November 19, 2013, 10:41:13 AM »
Interesting reading about the wafer production.

Not being a techie I could be wrong about this, but it sounds like the process is more organic or chemical than electronic, which in my mind would explain why the the cost doesn't drop nearly as much as for other components.
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9VIII

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Re: Canon EOS 7D Mark II in 2014 [CR2]
« Reply #132 on: November 19, 2013, 03:18:08 PM »
http://www.robgalbraith.com/images/canon_full-frame_cmos_white_paper.pdf
Thank for posting the link to the white paper. I see it was published in 2006... I don't know how much production processes might have changed since then. But it is very interesting reading none-the-less.

I'm not an electronics designer so I would appreciate some info with regards to the following questions:

1) Are sensors still being made on 8" silicon wafers? If larger diameter wafers are used then there could be a lower percentage wastage when larger sized sensors are manufactured, bringing it closer to the smaller sensors.

2) Is the silicon wafer the expensive raw material component in the manufacture or the sensor elements which (I assume) are deposited onto the wafers?

3) Why are these silicon wafers circular? If rectangular wafers could be used then there would be no inherent production wastage, only possible rejects.

These are honest questions, please don't bite my head off when answering.

Page 11 in the article itself.
Quote
Depending upon its composition, (for example, high-resistivity silicon wafers have much greater electrical field depth -- and broader spectral response -- than low-resistivity wafers) an 8" diameter wafer could cost as much as $450 to $500, $1,000 or even $5,000.

I'm going to go with "not cheap" as a baseline. If they only lose 50% of their chips per wafer that's $50-$500 per sensor in raw materials. I guess that's a big spread, but the possibilities are kind of scary to think about.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2013, 03:59:30 PM by 9VIII »
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Re: Canon EOS 7D Mark II in 2014 [CR2]
« Reply #132 on: November 19, 2013, 03:18:08 PM »

Marsu42

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Re: Canon EOS 7D Mark II in 2014 [CR2]
« Reply #133 on: November 19, 2013, 05:11:17 PM »
I'm going to go with "not cheap" as a baseline. If they only lose 50% of their chips per wafer that's $50-$500 per sensor in raw materials. I guess that's a big spread, but the possibilities are kind of scary to think about.

If I understand pp11 correctly at 0% loss worst case a raw ff sensor would be $250 ($5000/20) - strangely the article gives such a large price span for a dslr-sensor quality wafer, so I guess the cost would be much lower than this to prevent doing the exact calculation we're trying to do.

The big question is how much yield they get, maybe not as much as in computer processors as these are designed to work around defective circuits while on a dslr sensor a big flaw cannot be covered up.

Btw the paper is from 2006 and the aps-h advantage seems to have gone by now - maybe a lot of other things have also changed since then.

privatebydesign

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Re: Canon EOS 7D Mark II in 2014 [CR2]
« Reply #134 on: November 19, 2013, 08:06:12 PM »

Because of the laws of centrifugal force.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Czochralski_process

Sorry to be picky, but working with physics boffins sometimes rubs off.  Do you mean centripetal force?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centripetal_force

No.
Too often we lose sight of the fact that photography is about capturing light, if we have the ability to take control of that light then we grow exponentially as photographers. More often than not the image is not about lens speed, sensor size, MP's or AF, it is about the light.

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Re: Canon EOS 7D Mark II in 2014 [CR2]
« Reply #134 on: November 19, 2013, 08:06:12 PM »