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Author Topic: 7D + 50mm 1.8  (Read 11675 times)

FunkyJam

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7D + 50mm 1.8
« on: October 04, 2011, 10:47:54 AM »
Hey,

I just bought a 7D + 50mm 1.8 and I immediately started shooting with it but I've encountered a problem. So, I've read that if I want to create the cinematic effect I always have to set the shutter speed the double of the frames I'm using (eg if I use 30 frames I should set shutter speed at 1/60). That's what I did. Since I want to create that beautiful bokeh effect I have the aperture at 1.8 but the thing is, there's just too much light and the image is all white. I'm doing anything wrong or is it like that?

Help me out please!

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7D + 50mm 1.8
« on: October 04, 2011, 10:47:54 AM »

akiskev

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Re: 7D + 50mm 1.8
« Reply #1 on: October 04, 2011, 04:28:43 PM »
I suppose you shoot with iso 100.
You're not doing anything wrong. Just buy an ND filter!! SOmething between ND2-ND8 should do the trick but you should experiment with them yourself!
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Hesbehindyou

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Re: 7D + 50mm 1.8
« Reply #2 on: October 04, 2011, 04:46:13 PM »
I suppose you shoot with iso 100.
You're not doing anything wrong. Just buy an ND filter!! Something between ND2-ND8 should do the trick but you should experiment with them yourself!


It's worth pointing out that variable ND filters are available, so one doesn't have to keep swapping different strengths.

Also, there are good technical reasons why cameras are unable to offer very low ISO values - it's not the camera makers being stupid!

pelebel

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Re: 7D + 50mm 1.8
« Reply #3 on: October 04, 2011, 04:51:46 PM »
Maybe you're just shooting in a too well lit spot too!!!

You might wanna try a faster shutter speed too, images with just be cleaner...
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awinphoto

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Re: 7D + 50mm 1.8
« Reply #4 on: October 04, 2011, 05:22:40 PM »
Maybe you're just shooting in a too well lit spot too!!!

You might wanna try a faster shutter speed too, images with just be cleaner...

Faster shutters will lead to a choppy look on video... try neutral density filters... If you dont have any, try a simple polarizing filter... It knocks down 2 stops of light right there... It also can make for a more interesting scene.  Also shoot ISO 100. 
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quququ1

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Re: 7D + 50mm 1.8
« Reply #5 on: October 04, 2011, 06:01:45 PM »
Also, I suggest shooting at f2.8 for 50 f1.8, it's sharpest at f2.8 and will allow less light to pass through.

rowanlamb

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Re: 7D + 50mm 1.8
« Reply #6 on: October 05, 2011, 10:13:16 AM »
Also, I suggest shooting at f2.8 for 50 f1.8, it's sharpest at f2.8 and will allow less light to pass through.

Sound advice - your out-of-focus areas look even better when the area in focus is super-sharp, which it won't be at f/1.8. A good start, that ^

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Re: 7D + 50mm 1.8
« Reply #6 on: October 05, 2011, 10:13:16 AM »

Jedifarce

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Re: 7D + 50mm 1.8
« Reply #7 on: October 05, 2011, 02:58:12 PM »
Hey,

I just bought a 7D + 50mm 1.8 and I immediately started shooting with it but I've encountered a problem. So, I've read that if I want to create the cinematic effect I always have to set the shutter speed the double of the frames I'm using (eg if I use 30 frames I should set shutter speed at 1/60).

Shane Hurlbut recommends shooting at 1/50 for 30fps to take the sharpness off video.

Quote
That's what I did. Since I want to create that beautiful bokeh effect I have the aperture at 1.8 but the thing is,

Filming at 1.8 is really difficult and kind of unnecessary unless you're doing portraits, most directors will film at 2.8 or F/4. Any small movement of you or your subject will throw your focus off completely. However, if you're desperate for light and filiming at night then a 1.8 could be your best friend. It all depends on your ISO and shutter speeds, if you can't get the light you need from lower shutter speeds and higher ISO setting then you need a lens with a low F/stop.

Quote
there's just too much light and the image is all white. I'm doing anything wrong or is it like that?


You need to provide more information here, what time of the day were you filming - day or night, where were you fiiming - inside or outside, under what lighting conditions, what ISO were you using, what was your AWB setting.

 Just to let you know, with a 1.8 it lets in a lot of light, if you're filming under bright lights or the sun unless you increase the f/stop on your 1.8, you need to bring down your ISO or increase the shutter speed to compensate. Of course ND filters and polarizers work to keep your ISO and shutter speeds and f/stop where you'd like it to be.

 Whenever I shoot photography of landscape with a 28mm 2.8 under the glare of the sun, I will usually have an x4 ND filter, increase the f/stop to f8 or f11 with the ISO set around 100.
« Last Edit: October 05, 2011, 03:15:30 PM by Jedifarce »

neuroanatomist

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Re: 7D + 50mm 1.8
« Reply #8 on: October 05, 2011, 03:52:51 PM »
Quote
That's what I did. Since I want to create that beautiful bokeh effect I have the aperture at 1.8 but the thing is,
Filming at 1.8 is really difficult and kind of unnecessary unless you're doing portraits, most directors will film at 2.8 or F/4.

Are those 'most directors' shooting with 7D's or with 5DII's?  If the latter, keep in mind that in terms of DoF for the same subject framing, f/1.8 on a 7D is the same as f/2.8 on a 5DII.
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Jedifarce

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Re: 7D + 50mm 1.8
« Reply #9 on: October 05, 2011, 05:11:47 PM »

Are those 'most directors' shooting with 7D's or with 5DII's?  If the latter, keep in mind that in terms of DoF for the same subject framing, f/1.8 on a 7D is the same as f/2.8 on a 5DII.

 I'd say directors Shane Hurlbut and Philip Bloom pretty much know what they are talking about when it comes to filming with their canon DSLR's.

 As for depth of field, it's meaningless if you can't keep your subject in focus.

jawsborne

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Re: 7D + 50mm 1.8
« Reply #10 on: October 07, 2011, 12:25:41 AM »
I'm new here and really excited to find this cool and very active forum! 

I've been shooting photos for some time and now want to jump into the realm of DSLR video.   I've yet to buy a body capable of shooting video.  I'm having trouble deciding on the 7D or 5D2.  I've wanted a FF for a while for photos but not sure if I should spend the extra money.  But maybe I'll just wait to see if Canon comes out with something new.

(didn't mean to hijack your thread FunkyJam) 

Thanks.


Are those 'most directors' shooting with 7D's or with 5DII's?  If the latter, keep in mind that in terms of DoF for the same subject framing, f/1.8 on a 7D is the same as f/2.8 on a 5DII.

This statement totally blew me away!  really??  I was fully aware of the difference in what the focal length looks like when comparing a FF to a crop.  But the aperature??

AGMedia

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Re: 7D + 50mm 1.8
« Reply #11 on: October 07, 2011, 12:51:46 AM »
This statement totally blew me away!  really??  I was fully aware of the difference in what the focal length looks like when comparing a FF to a crop.  But the aperature??

I don't know that his numbers are precisely correct, but in general, the concept he's conveying is correct.

AGMedia

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Re: 7D + 50mm 1.8
« Reply #12 on: October 07, 2011, 01:13:33 AM »
Hey,

I just bought a 7D + 50mm 1.8 and I immediately started shooting with it but I've encountered a problem. So, I've read that if I want to create the cinematic effect I always have to set the shutter speed the double of the frames I'm using (eg if I use 30 frames I should set shutter speed at 1/60). That's what I did. Since I want to create that beautiful bokeh effect I have the aperture at 1.8 but the thing is, there's just too much light and the image is all white. I'm doing anything wrong or is it like that?

Help me out please!

Your combination ( 7D & 1.8 ) is capable of producing some powerful video results.  Just treat that 1.8 very gently -- it's not know for its durability.

The neutral density filter advice is correct.  If you want to save money, buy simple ND filters -- from memory I think, think, the one to start out with for daylight shots is the 4 stop filter.  I use a variable ND, and it cost much more.  It's the difference between thirty bucks and two hundred.

Stopping your nifty-fifty down to 2.8 is also good advice.  After you get your ND filter and shoot something outside, the difference in sharpness between 1.8 and 2.8 will be shockingly apparent.

The "cinema" look on your 7D is shutter at 1/50th at 1080/24p.  But, don't get too chained down by the "shutter rules."  Experiment, be free, be bold.  The shutter speed isn't what's creating a "cinematic" look -- it's your frame rate (60p, 30p, 24p) that has the most obvious effect.  24p is the "movie" frame rate, 30p is the TV frame rate, and 60p (at 720) is the HD cable news network look frame rate.

I think someone in this thread asked if the 5D or 7D is being used more for productions.  The honest answer is they're both being used -- and everyone who's using them both is waiting for the 5Dm3.  Currently, either is a good option relative to HDSLR video.  For example, Philip Bloom, the guru-extraordinaire of HDSLR video, his favorite camera is the 5D.  However, according to him, almost everything he shot for George Lucas on "Red Tails" was done on a 7D because you can mount a PL lens on a 7D -- but can't on a 5D.

So -- can you use your nifty-fifty and 7D to make a feature film?  Absolutely yes.  Your issue isn't lack of equipment, it's lack of experience.  Learn, learn, learn, practice, practice, practice, test, test, test......  Your only barriers are your skills and imagination.
« Last Edit: October 07, 2011, 01:15:23 AM by AGMedia »

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Re: 7D + 50mm 1.8
« Reply #12 on: October 07, 2011, 01:13:33 AM »

Jedifarce

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Re: 7D + 50mm 1.8
« Reply #13 on: October 08, 2011, 01:43:15 AM »

The "cinema" look on your 7D is shutter at 1/50th at 1080/24p.  But, don't get too chained down by the "shutter rules."  Experiment, be free, be bold.  The shutter speed isn't what's creating a "cinematic" look -- it's your frame rate (60p, 30p, 24p) that has the most obvious effect.  24p is the "movie" frame rate, 30p is the TV frame rate, and 60p (at 720) is the HD cable news network look frame rate.

 I would like to add that recording in 24p is really a bad option for any quick movement, it creates motion blur because you're simply not taking in enough information. I generally film at 30p for those times, and with 30p you can slow down the footage in post about 15% without ruining the overall look. 60p would be great if it were 1920x1080, which I suppose can be cropped in post.

AGMedia

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Re: 7D + 50mm 1.8
« Reply #14 on: October 08, 2011, 06:41:24 AM »
I would like to add that recording in 24p is really a bad option for any quick movement, it creates motion blur because you're simply not taking in enough information. I generally film at 30p for those times, and with 30p you can slow down the footage in post about 15% without ruining the overall look. 60p would be great if it were 1920x1080, which I suppose can be cropped in post.

Yes.  And this must be the reason that all Hollywood films of the past one hundred years (all delivered at 24p) have avoided "any quick movement."

Understanding how to use 24p relates to basic cinematography.

If your point is that 30p is more dummy-proof than 24p, well, to a very limited extent, yes.  60p is by far the most dummy-proof frame rate. 

Also, when I came in here to respond I noticed in an earlier post you indicated that Shane Hurlbut recommends 1/50th shutter for 30p.  This is incorrect.  His point relates to simulating film camera shutter, and you vaguely accomplish this with a video camera by doubling the frame rate.  So, for 24 frames per second your shutter would be 1/48.  However, Canon DSLRs don't do 1/48 -- so you set them to the closest -- 1/50.

This doesn't apply to 30p, as it has no relationship to over a hundred years of film cameras -- that have been filming at 24p since Thomas Edison.  30p is American television -- the soap opera look.  Set your shutter to whatever you want at 30p -- because simulating a film camera shutter at 30p is pure fantasy.

For slow motion -- shoot at 60p.  30p doesn't give you enough room for anything meaningful.

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Re: 7D + 50mm 1.8
« Reply #14 on: October 08, 2011, 06:41:24 AM »