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Author Topic: Sigma 135mm f/2 DG OS Art Coming? [CR1]  (Read 7856 times)

LowBloodSugar

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Re: Sigma 135mm f/2 DG OS Art Coming? [CR1]
« Reply #60 on: December 17, 2013, 08:58:23 PM »
Its strange that canon doesn't have more IS lenses.  100mm 2.8L IS Macro is the only macro IS prime canon has near that range.  The one drawback of that lens is that manual focus is twitchy at longer distances.  I am hoping for a non-macro IS prime in the 90-135 range.  Perferably canon.  This is an enticing rumor
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ScottyP

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Re: Sigma 135mm f/2 DG OS Art Coming? [CR1]
« Reply #61 on: December 17, 2013, 09:04:33 PM »
There's lots to improve on the 135L. If all Sigma did was improve corner performance wide open I would be happy. A shorter MFD would be nice too.


Big DSLR announcement, hmmmm. Could they make a camera with an EF mount? Just think, all the sigma lenses sold to canon users would now work on it along with the canon lenses too, it would be a Trojan horse coup d'e'tat

Interesting, but they'd need to ditch the Foveon sensor and go regular. Too large a data file not to have any real improvement in resolution, at least not that ive read anywhere outside the Sigma website.  Or maybe  non-Bayer like Fuji's x-trans. That would be exciting indeed.

What if Sigma made a Canon EF mount camera with a Sony sensor. So-sigma?  Sig-ony?  Sig-can-nony?

I'd rather see them to with the non-Bayer design though.

I think part of the whole reason their Foveon camera didn't take off was that it was a crop sensor. Originally they were asking 1D prices for an APS-C camera, that just doesn't fly.
If they can put out a 20MP full frame Foveon sensor (60MP counting individual sub pixels), upgrade the autofocus, make sure it has lots of dials and price it to compete with the D800, I think they would have a winner.

I'd welcome the competition. Price would have to come down, but FPS and buffer depth would need to come up. Not sure how much Sigma can do about that given those huge files.  Their latest body was a little weak on that department. Is the blockage there the card's speed or their processor speed?
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beckstoy

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Re: Sigma 135mm f/2 DG OS Art Coming? [CR1]
« Reply #62 on: December 17, 2013, 11:18:19 PM »
Just today I purchased my first (and only) 135L.  I'd been putting it off until I learned more about the Rumored Siggy, but realized that I'll probably be able to sell my 135L for the Sigma if it's really so amazing.  I'm sure I'll get back nearly the whole purchase price!

...not to mention that I'll have ten months using it!  For what it's worth, the 135L is a stunner.  I'm super excited.
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AdamJ

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Re: Sigma 135mm f/2 DG OS Art Coming? [CR1]
« Reply #63 on: December 18, 2013, 06:44:47 PM »
Am I alone in finding lateral CA easier to correct in post than axial CA? I'd be happy to learn how to correct axial CA reliably.

Are you sure you have them the right way round?

http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/lens-corrections.htm

The control panel in Lightroom-Develop-Lens Corrections-Color is all about correcting fringing, this can manifest from either lateral or axial CA. Though it can deal with blooming too, the colours are normally different. Lateral is two colours with red/magenta and green/yellow, axial is normally purple, as is blooming.

Just click the box! If that doesn't do the job very well adjusting the range and colour of the sliders will normally sort it out very well. You can even use the picker to select the exact tone of your problem CA/blooming.


Below are two images that illustrate dealing with lateral CA, the image is enlarged 200% and then a screen shot of the image and the control box.

The link you provided confirms what I said, that lateral CA is easier to correct than axial CA!

privatebydesign

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Re: Sigma 135mm f/2 DG OS Art Coming? [CR1]
« Reply #64 on: December 18, 2013, 07:28:13 PM »
Am I alone in finding lateral CA easier to correct in post than axial CA? I'd be happy to learn how to correct axial CA reliably.

Are you sure you have them the right way round?

http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/lens-corrections.htm

The control panel in Lightroom-Develop-Lens Corrections-Color is all about correcting fringing, this can manifest from either lateral or axial CA. Though it can deal with blooming too, the colours are normally different. Lateral is two colours with red/magenta and green/yellow, axial is normally purple, as is blooming.

Just click the box! If that doesn't do the job very well adjusting the range and colour of the sliders will normally sort it out very well. You can even use the picker to select the exact tone of your problem CA/blooming.


Below are two images that illustrate dealing with lateral CA, the image is enlarged 200% and then a screen shot of the image and the control box.

The link you provided confirms what I said, that lateral CA is easier to correct than axial CA!


You are right, I am very sorry I obviously suffered from scrambled brain! I even provided the link that confirmed it! Too much coffee  ;D

In my defense I just read your comment the wrong way round, but ended up describing it the right way round. Of course with regards Axial CA, it depends on how blurred the image looks, if the fringing is more noticeable than the blur then you can mitigate it to a large extent with de-fringing and sharpening, obviously not super effective on the graphic but probably passable on screen in a real image.

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