September 22, 2014, 02:22:40 PM

Author Topic: Tilt shift for dummies  (Read 4116 times)

ahsanford

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Re: Tilt shift for dummies
« Reply #30 on: January 17, 2014, 06:27:09 PM »
Late to the party here, and I don't shoot T/S, but I did find this recent T/S video from the RokiBowYang camp quite interesting:

Samyang Tilt-Shift 24mm f/3.5 in action

Lots of examples.  The idea of using T/S to keep a large depth of field in focus (albeit in a line) without having to stop down or composite multiple shots was pretty cool. (See 6:18 - 7:10).

- A

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Re: Tilt shift for dummies
« Reply #30 on: January 17, 2014, 06:27:09 PM »

Quasimodo

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Re: Tilt shift for dummies
« Reply #31 on: January 17, 2014, 06:31:30 PM »
Late to the party here, and I don't shoot T/S, but I did find this recent T/S video from the RokiBowYang camp quite interesting:

Samyang Tilt-Shift 24mm f/3.5 in action

Lots of examples.  The idea of using T/S to keep a large depth of field in focus (albeit in a line) without having to stop down or composite multiple shots was pretty cool. (See 6:18 - 7:10).

- A

Better late than not attending at all :) I will look at the video tomorrow as it is 12.30 am here now, and the kids show no mercy when it comes to sleeping habits appropriate for weekends :)
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privatebydesign

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Re: Tilt shift for dummies
« Reply #32 on: January 17, 2014, 06:33:25 PM »
The entirety of what you need to understand is encapsulated in the two gif's on the page I linked to originally.

Scheimpflug is only half the interesting bit, and his work has little relevance to us, he was only interested in huge J point distances that require very little tilt. His work was for battlefield imagery from balloons in the first world war.

Merklinger, and his J point/hinge line, are the really interesting bits for us and nothing explains this half as well as the gif does.

If you want a deeper understanding of the maths then Merklinger's free ebook, and lets not forget he actually wrote the book on this, is available here http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~ILIM/courses/vision-sensors/readings/FVC16.pdf

His other work, on depth of field for tilted images, is available entirely free too, here, http://www.trenholm.org/hmmerk/TIAOOFe.pdf

You do not need to buy anything to have the deepest understanding of tilt and shift use.
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Quasimodo

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Re: Tilt shift for dummies
« Reply #33 on: January 17, 2014, 06:48:54 PM »
The entirety of what you need to understand is encapsulated in the two gif's on the page I linked to originally.

Scheimpflug is only half the interesting bit, and his work has little relevance to us, he was only interested in huge J point distances that require very little tilt. His work was for battlefield imagery from balloons in the first world war.

Merklinger, and his J point/hinge line, are the really interesting bits for us and nothing explains this half as well as the gif does.

If you want a deeper understanding of the maths then Merklinger's free ebook, and lets not forget he actually wrote the book on this, is available here http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~ILIM/courses/vision-sensors/readings/FVC16.pdf

His other work, on depth of field for tilted images, is available entirely free too, here, http://www.trenholm.org/hmmerk/TIAOOFe.pdf

You do not need to buy anything to have the deepest understanding of tilt and shift use.

Thank you PBD. I will read this first :)
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LightandMotion

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Re: Tilt shift for dummies
« Reply #34 on: January 17, 2014, 06:57:29 PM »
Sorry, haven't read the whole thread, but from my perspective, Darwin Wiggett's ebook on TS was particularly helpful for me:

http://www.oopoomoo.com/ebook/the-tilt-shift-lens/
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Quasimodo

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Re: Tilt shift for dummies
« Reply #35 on: January 18, 2014, 04:43:42 AM »
Sorry, haven't read the whole thread, but from my perspective, Darwin Wiggett's ebook on TS was particularly helpful for me:

http://www.oopoomoo.com/ebook/the-tilt-shift-lens/

Thanks :) Surapon and others have suggested the book also in other treads here on TS. It looks good, but primarly on landscape, and not on other areas that I would like to explore.
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JustMeOregon

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Re: Tilt shift for dummies
« Reply #36 on: January 18, 2014, 06:23:40 PM »
Quote
Sorry, haven't read the whole thread, but from my perspective, Darwin Wiggett's ebook on TS was particularly helpful for me:

http://www.oopoomoo.com/ebook/the-tilt-shift-lens/

I'm not intending to be confrontational at all, but I found the Darwin ebook ("The Tilt-Shift Lens Advantage for Outdoor & Nature Photography") to be a complete waste of $20... It's overly simplistic and too full of "pretty pictures"... But my biggest problem with this book is with regards to his approach to finding the correct "balance" between lens-tilt & focus to achieve the "infinite depth-of-field effect" that most beginning tilt-shift-photographers struggle with... His technique of "bend (tilt) for background, [and then] focus for foreground" is the exact opposite way everyone else does it; and his insistence that "if you mix these up, you’ll likely never find optimal tilt" is just flat-out wrong...

A quick Google-search will show that everyone else tells you to "focus for the background & tilt for the foreground." It really isn't difficult at all to find the correct "balance" between lens-tilt & focus to get the "infinite depth-of-field effect." It's just really hard to try to explain to someone who hasn't spent an afternoon playing around (experimenting/practicing) with a TS lens. Those animated gif's referred to by privatebydesign (over at northlight-images http://www.northlight-images.co.uk/article_pages/using_tilt.html) are a great way to get your head around the whole tilt vs focus thing... And once you're comfortable with the idea of balancing tilt & focus, a great short-cut (that I use all the time) is described here: http://www.northlight-images.co.uk/article_pages/focus-with-tilt.html.

Richard
« Last Edit: January 18, 2014, 06:28:05 PM by JustMeOregon »

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Re: Tilt shift for dummies
« Reply #36 on: January 18, 2014, 06:23:40 PM »