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Author Topic: Tilt shift for dummies  (Read 7311 times)

ahsanford

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Re: Tilt shift for dummies
« Reply #30 on: January 17, 2014, 06:27:09 PM »
Late to the party here, and I don't shoot T/S, but I did find this recent T/S video from the RokiBowYang camp quite interesting:

Samyang Tilt-Shift 24mm f/3.5 in action

Lots of examples.  The idea of using T/S to keep a large depth of field in focus (albeit in a line) without having to stop down or composite multiple shots was pretty cool. (See 6:18 - 7:10).

- A

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Re: Tilt shift for dummies
« Reply #30 on: January 17, 2014, 06:27:09 PM »

Quasimodo

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Re: Tilt shift for dummies
« Reply #31 on: January 17, 2014, 06:31:30 PM »
Late to the party here, and I don't shoot T/S, but I did find this recent T/S video from the RokiBowYang camp quite interesting:

Samyang Tilt-Shift 24mm f/3.5 in action

Lots of examples.  The idea of using T/S to keep a large depth of field in focus (albeit in a line) without having to stop down or composite multiple shots was pretty cool. (See 6:18 - 7:10).

- A

Better late than not attending at all :) I will look at the video tomorrow as it is 12.30 am here now, and the kids show no mercy when it comes to sleeping habits appropriate for weekends :)
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privatebydesign

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Re: Tilt shift for dummies
« Reply #32 on: January 17, 2014, 06:33:25 PM »
The entirety of what you need to understand is encapsulated in the two gif's on the page I linked to originally.

Scheimpflug is only half the interesting bit, and his work has little relevance to us, he was only interested in huge J point distances that require very little tilt. His work was for battlefield imagery from balloons in the first world war.

Merklinger, and his J point/hinge line, are the really interesting bits for us and nothing explains this half as well as the gif does.

If you want a deeper understanding of the maths then Merklinger's free ebook, and lets not forget he actually wrote the book on this, is available here http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~ILIM/courses/vision-sensors/readings/FVC16.pdf

His other work, on depth of field for tilted images, is available entirely free too, here, http://www.trenholm.org/hmmerk/TIAOOFe.pdf

You do not need to buy anything to have the deepest understanding of tilt and shift use.
Too often we lose sight of the fact that photography is about capturing light, if we have the ability to take control of that light then we grow exponentially as photographers. More often than not the image is not about lens speed, sensor size, MP's or AF, it is about the light.

Quasimodo

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Re: Tilt shift for dummies
« Reply #33 on: January 17, 2014, 06:48:54 PM »
The entirety of what you need to understand is encapsulated in the two gif's on the page I linked to originally.

Scheimpflug is only half the interesting bit, and his work has little relevance to us, he was only interested in huge J point distances that require very little tilt. His work was for battlefield imagery from balloons in the first world war.

Merklinger, and his J point/hinge line, are the really interesting bits for us and nothing explains this half as well as the gif does.

If you want a deeper understanding of the maths then Merklinger's free ebook, and lets not forget he actually wrote the book on this, is available here http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~ILIM/courses/vision-sensors/readings/FVC16.pdf

His other work, on depth of field for tilted images, is available entirely free too, here, http://www.trenholm.org/hmmerk/TIAOOFe.pdf

You do not need to buy anything to have the deepest understanding of tilt and shift use.

Thank you PBD. I will read this first :)
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LightandMotion

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Re: Tilt shift for dummies
« Reply #34 on: January 17, 2014, 06:57:29 PM »
Sorry, haven't read the whole thread, but from my perspective, Darwin Wiggett's ebook on TS was particularly helpful for me:

http://www.oopoomoo.com/ebook/the-tilt-shift-lens/
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Quasimodo

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Re: Tilt shift for dummies
« Reply #35 on: January 18, 2014, 04:43:42 AM »
Sorry, haven't read the whole thread, but from my perspective, Darwin Wiggett's ebook on TS was particularly helpful for me:

http://www.oopoomoo.com/ebook/the-tilt-shift-lens/

Thanks :) Surapon and others have suggested the book also in other treads here on TS. It looks good, but primarly on landscape, and not on other areas that I would like to explore.
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JustMeOregon

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Re: Tilt shift for dummies
« Reply #36 on: January 18, 2014, 06:23:40 PM »
Quote
Sorry, haven't read the whole thread, but from my perspective, Darwin Wiggett's ebook on TS was particularly helpful for me:

http://www.oopoomoo.com/ebook/the-tilt-shift-lens/

I'm not intending to be confrontational at all, but I found the Darwin ebook ("The Tilt-Shift Lens Advantage for Outdoor & Nature Photography") to be a complete waste of $20... It's overly simplistic and too full of "pretty pictures"... But my biggest problem with this book is with regards to his approach to finding the correct "balance" between lens-tilt & focus to achieve the "infinite depth-of-field effect" that most beginning tilt-shift-photographers struggle with... His technique of "bend (tilt) for background, [and then] focus for foreground" is the exact opposite way everyone else does it; and his insistence that "if you mix these up, you’ll likely never find optimal tilt" is just flat-out wrong...

A quick Google-search will show that everyone else tells you to "focus for the background & tilt for the foreground." It really isn't difficult at all to find the correct "balance" between lens-tilt & focus to get the "infinite depth-of-field effect." It's just really hard to try to explain to someone who hasn't spent an afternoon playing around (experimenting/practicing) with a TS lens. Those animated gif's referred to by privatebydesign (over at northlight-images http://www.northlight-images.co.uk/article_pages/using_tilt.html) are a great way to get your head around the whole tilt vs focus thing... And once you're comfortable with the idea of balancing tilt & focus, a great short-cut (that I use all the time) is described here: http://www.northlight-images.co.uk/article_pages/focus-with-tilt.html.

Richard
« Last Edit: January 18, 2014, 06:28:05 PM by JustMeOregon »

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Re: Tilt shift for dummies
« Reply #36 on: January 18, 2014, 06:23:40 PM »