October 31, 2014, 01:04:44 AM

Author Topic: Canon 6D Review: 1+ Year Hands-On [video review]  (Read 12203 times)

grahamclarkphoto

  • Rebel SL1
  • ***
  • Posts: 98
  • Just a photographer who loves to travel.
    • View Profile
    • grahamclarkphoto.com
Re: Canon 6D Review: 1+ Year Hands-On [video review]
« Reply #30 on: January 20, 2014, 07:26:20 PM »
These are stunning pictures and I like the very practical review too. I really cant see any harsh tonal transitions, color shifts or lacking DR. The files look gorgeous to my eyes.

Apart from that I would like a smaller body with better live view implementation too...

Thanks! : )

The images I posted here on CanonRumors were exported with 80/100 quality, and three of the images found here have very slight lateral banding in the sky, however the originals do not. The amount of detail is so extreme that even a small amount of compression destroys the delicate gradient :|

Graham
"Why limit yourself to what your eyes see when you have an opportunity to extend your vision?" - Edward Weston

canon rumors FORUM

Re: Canon 6D Review: 1+ Year Hands-On [video review]
« Reply #30 on: January 20, 2014, 07:26:20 PM »

grahamclarkphoto

  • Rebel SL1
  • ***
  • Posts: 98
  • Just a photographer who loves to travel.
    • View Profile
    • grahamclarkphoto.com
Re: Canon 6D Review: 1+ Year Hands-On [video review]
« Reply #31 on: January 20, 2014, 07:28:13 PM »
Graham, just wanted to check in again to say that I just watched the whole video review.  Great stuff.  I don't agree on your degree of vehemence on the lack of usefulness of the Wi-fi (I have found quite a few very practical uses), but overall I agree with just about all of your other conclusions and appreciate the effort put into it.

Thanks Dustin! : )

Regarding the intervalometer, I was referring specifically to the lack of an intervalometer. Everyone's different, however every landscape image I capture is with an intervalometer so the lack of that functionality (which is easy to code in objective-C with the canon SDK) doesn't really make sense.

Seeing how the last update to the Canon intervalometer was in November of 1998 with the Canon EOS-3, its about time they look to the future and design for mobile devices.

Graham
"Why limit yourself to what your eyes see when you have an opportunity to extend your vision?" - Edward Weston

grahamclarkphoto

  • Rebel SL1
  • ***
  • Posts: 98
  • Just a photographer who loves to travel.
    • View Profile
    • grahamclarkphoto.com
Re: Canon 6D Review: 1+ Year Hands-On [video review]
« Reply #32 on: January 20, 2014, 07:29:22 PM »
.
Thanks. Nicely done.

Your experience confirms my first comments about the WIFI and GPS. Outside of marketing hype, it seems essentially pointless.

This body is an option I continue to consider as a second to by 5D3. With the recent 7D2 news, this may be the year I can decide to go wholly FF or else choose to keep one foot in the APS-C realm.

Anyway, thanks for a great contribution to the photographic community with your work.

Thanks! I think in it's current state the wifi is essentially useless, but I do think that's a short-term issue.

GPS on the other hand is a breakthrough feature (in my opinion), despite its shortcomings on the user experience side of things.

Graham
"Why limit yourself to what your eyes see when you have an opportunity to extend your vision?" - Edward Weston

grahamclarkphoto

  • Rebel SL1
  • ***
  • Posts: 98
  • Just a photographer who loves to travel.
    • View Profile
    • grahamclarkphoto.com
Re: Canon 6D Review: 1+ Year Hands-On [video review]
« Reply #33 on: January 20, 2014, 07:34:07 PM »
These are stunning pictures and I like the very practical review too. I really cant see any harsh tonal transitions, color shifts or lacking DR. The files look gorgeous to my eyes.

Apart from that I would like a smaller body with better live view implementation too...

It's a great camera. I've been using a 5DIII for sevel years and seeing simular results. I'm not a great fan of ND grads...I really don't see the point in the post digital world. They rarely can captur the correct dynamic range and some of these images illustrate my point. A 2 -3 shot merge in Photoshop with images shot at different exposures for specific parts of the scene are generally a better way to go. Using the histogram to meter for different ends of the contrast scale.

There's several highlight blow outs in some of the sky images and why is the sky darker than the land / foreground...looks like to strong grad filters too me. Nice colours, but some of the scenes look like there's false colours added from the ND grads colour casts. The scenes are nice and dramatic, but many of these would fail RPS judging (or degree level photography portfolio judging) due to the exposure issues I've just mentioned. There's bad flare in one shot and another has split boulders in the fore ground, it's important not to split any in half at the edges of the frame. These are very nice and colourfull images, i'm sure they sell well to punters. Especially to the framed print crowds, but really wouldn't impress anyone with a qualification in photography.

1. Some of these images have been on covers of books, including the upcoming International Masters of Photography. Those are judged by professional portfolio reviewer. Perhaps you should sign up as a reviewer! : )

2. I'm a beginner photographer, still learning the fundamentals

3. Graduated Neutral Density filters are one way to obtain a correct and balanced exposure (and as a result, native saturation), but there are others as you have suggested, namely in software.

Everyone's different. I don't use software to balance the exposure or to achieve saturation, whereas some people only use software to obtain this. Is either way better? I don't think so.

"There's so much digital adding of stuff here and there that photographers may as well become painters" - Galen Rowell

4. Looking at the professional gallery circuit (having been in it and being familiar with those who work in it) I don't see many serious landscape photographers working with software. I'm seeing more rock solid technique and willingness to be out in the natural world at the right time, and an uncanny sense for how the conditions translate into a final print.

5. Not sure if I catch the qualifications in photography bit
« Last Edit: January 20, 2014, 07:38:22 PM by grahamclarkphoto »
"Why limit yourself to what your eyes see when you have an opportunity to extend your vision?" - Edward Weston

grahamclarkphoto

  • Rebel SL1
  • ***
  • Posts: 98
  • Just a photographer who loves to travel.
    • View Profile
    • grahamclarkphoto.com
Re: Canon 6D Review: 1+ Year Hands-On [video review]
« Reply #34 on: January 20, 2014, 07:34:44 PM »
Good review and inspiring work, but surely the 6D sensor is different to that of the 5D III?

sensor is different, quality is the same.
"Why limit yourself to what your eyes see when you have an opportunity to extend your vision?" - Edward Weston

grahamclarkphoto

  • Rebel SL1
  • ***
  • Posts: 98
  • Just a photographer who loves to travel.
    • View Profile
    • grahamclarkphoto.com
Re: Canon 6D Review: 1+ Year Hands-On [video review]
« Reply #35 on: January 20, 2014, 07:35:25 PM »
Graham, excellent review! Excellent photographs too!

I am glad to see someone else finds the 17-40L a great landscape lens. It is my goto long exposure landscape lens along with the Lee filter system.

Excellent work!

Thanks! However I have never used lee filters before, but I do have a lee filter holder : )
"Why limit yourself to what your eyes see when you have an opportunity to extend your vision?" - Edward Weston

grahamclarkphoto

  • Rebel SL1
  • ***
  • Posts: 98
  • Just a photographer who loves to travel.
    • View Profile
    • grahamclarkphoto.com
Re: Canon 6D Review: 1+ Year Hands-On [video review]
« Reply #36 on: January 20, 2014, 07:40:23 PM »
These are stunning pictures and I like the very practical review too. I really cant see any harsh tonal transitions, color shifts or lacking DR. The files look gorgeous to my eyes.

Apart from that I would like a smaller body with better live view implementation too...

It's a great camera. I've been using a 5DIII for sevel years and seeing simular results. I'm not a great fan of ND grads...I really don't see the point in the post digital world. They rarely can captur the correct dynamic range and some of these images illustrate my point. A 2 -3 shot merge in Photoshop with images shot at different exposures for specific parts of the scene are generally a better way to go. Using the histogram to meter for different ends of the contrast scale.

There's several highlight blow outs in some of the sky images and why is the sky darker than the land / foreground...looks like to strong grad filters too me. Nice colours, but some of the scenes look like there's false colours added from the ND grads colour casts. The scenes are nice and dramatic, but many of these would fail RPS judging (or degree level photography portfolio judging) due to the exposure issues I've just mentioned. There's bad flare in one shot and another has split boulders in the fore ground, it's important not to split any in half at the edges of the frame. These are very nice and colourfull images, i'm sure they sell well to punters. Especially to the framed print crowds, but really wouldn't impress anyone with a qualification in photography.

I almost forgot to ask, what's your website URL?

Graham
"Why limit yourself to what your eyes see when you have an opportunity to extend your vision?" - Edward Weston

canon rumors FORUM

Re: Canon 6D Review: 1+ Year Hands-On [video review]
« Reply #36 on: January 20, 2014, 07:40:23 PM »

toodamnice

  • PowerShot G1 X II
  • ***
  • Posts: 58
    • View Profile
    • flickr
Re: Canon 6D Review: 1+ Year Hands-On [video review]
« Reply #37 on: January 20, 2014, 08:10:00 PM »
"The CMOS sensor found in the Canon 6D is the same found in the Canon 5D Mark III."

Is this true???
Bring on the storms!!!

Two Canon 6Ds. EOS M with the EF-M 22 f2. Canon EF 16-35 f2.8L II, Canon EF 50 f1.4, Canon EF 85 f1.8, Canon EF 70-200 f4L IS, Rokinon 14 f2.8.

dude

  • PowerShot G1 X II
  • ***
  • Posts: 40
    • View Profile
Re: Canon 6D Review: 1+ Year Hands-On [video review]
« Reply #38 on: January 20, 2014, 08:19:17 PM »
I do have a question. I noticed many of your photos had been shot at an ISO of 50. Do you see much difference between 50 and 100?

1DX, 5diii, M
L lenses for all occasions

grahamclarkphoto

  • Rebel SL1
  • ***
  • Posts: 98
  • Just a photographer who loves to travel.
    • View Profile
    • grahamclarkphoto.com
Re: Canon 6D Review: 1+ Year Hands-On [video review]
« Reply #39 on: January 21, 2014, 01:23:10 AM »
"The CMOS sensor found in the Canon 6D is the same found in the Canon 5D Mark III."

Is this true???

with regards to quality, yes it's the same!
"Why limit yourself to what your eyes see when you have an opportunity to extend your vision?" - Edward Weston

grahamclarkphoto

  • Rebel SL1
  • ***
  • Posts: 98
  • Just a photographer who loves to travel.
    • View Profile
    • grahamclarkphoto.com
Re: Canon 6D Review: 1+ Year Hands-On [video review]
« Reply #40 on: January 21, 2014, 01:24:34 AM »
I do have a question. I noticed many of your photos had been shot at an ISO of 50. Do you see much difference between 50 and 100?

ISO 50 is pulled from 100 - it's a non-native ISO. theoretically ISO 100 is better quality as it's native, but in real world results I find them to be equal with regards to quality.

I use ISO 50 a majority of the time for exposure purposes - to push the exposure out longer.
"Why limit yourself to what your eyes see when you have an opportunity to extend your vision?" - Edward Weston

Reavus

  • SX60 HS
  • **
  • Posts: 1
    • View Profile
Re: Canon 6D Review: 1+ Year Hands-On [video review]
« Reply #41 on: January 21, 2014, 02:27:06 AM »
I'll go as far as to say that I have actually found the wifi to be a pretty handy feature. For me anyway.

In terms remote shooting yes it could be better but for transferring images I don't think the intent was to transfer the entire image catalogue on the camera to your computer.

The area that I have found it to be extremely useful is when I'm out in the field and there is one photo that I want to upload to facebook/twitter/instagram or whatever medium, I can connect my phone or iPad to the camera, take the photo, maybe do some tweaking to it with VSCOcam or something and send it off. How easy is that? If I'm grabbing the entire collection of photos off the camera, then I would just take the card out and put it in the computer.

And the time consuming part only happens on the set up. Once you have the settings in place, the phone and camera remember each other so all you need to do is turn on each devices respective wifi and they connect pretty quickly.

MichaelHodges

  • Canon 6D
  • *****
  • Posts: 376
    • View Profile
Re: Canon 6D Review: 1+ Year Hands-On [video review]
« Reply #42 on: January 21, 2014, 04:19:37 PM »
"The CMOS sensor found in the Canon 6D is the same found in the Canon 5D Mark III."

Is this true???

with regards to quality, yes it's the same!

There are some reports I've seen indicating the 6d is actually noticeably better in noise and DR.

canon rumors FORUM

Re: Canon 6D Review: 1+ Year Hands-On [video review]
« Reply #42 on: January 21, 2014, 04:19:37 PM »

bholliman

  • 1D Mark IV
  • ******
  • Posts: 765
    • View Profile
Re: Canon 6D Review: 1+ Year Hands-On [video review]
« Reply #43 on: January 21, 2014, 04:44:04 PM »
Graham, just wanted to check in again to say that I just watched the whole video review.  Great stuff.  I don't agree on your degree of vehemence on the lack of usefulness of the Wi-fi (I have found quite a few very practical uses), but overall I agree with just about all of your other conclusions and appreciate the effort put into it.


Thanks! I think in it's current state the wifi is essentially useless, but I do think that's a short-term issue.

GPS on the other hand is a breakthrough feature (in my opinion), despite its shortcomings on the user experience side of things.

Graham

I suppose WiFi and GPS are features that will have different value to every camera owner.  I find the WiFi feature to be somewhat useful for remote control via the EOS Utility and occasionally to transfer jpeg's to a tablet, phone or laptop.  The EOS utility is limited, but functional.

I have never used GPS and don't anticipate ever using it.  So, for me its a useless feature.



Bodies:  6D, EOS-M (22/2 and 18-55)
Lenses: Rokinon 14mm 2.8, 35mm 2.0 IS, 85mm 1.8, 100mm 2.8L IS Macro, 135mm 2.0L, 24-70mm 2.8L II, 70-200mm 2.8L IS II, Extenders: EF 1.4xIII, EF 2xIII ; Flash: ST-E3-RT, 600EX-RT (x3)

gsko

  • SX60 HS
  • **
  • Posts: 2
  • Practice Photography with Passion & Responsibility
    • View Profile
Re: Canon 6D Review: 1+ Year Hands-On [video review]
« Reply #44 on: January 21, 2014, 06:07:26 PM »
I would also like to thank Graham for the wonderful pictures and very useful/informative real-world review.

I'm new to this forum (this is my first post  :D) and the point I would like to raise, begins like this...

Against a lot of opinions I have been reading in various sites (including CanonRumors), I went ahead and replaced my wonderful 5d mk2 with a Canon 6d. Being just an enthusiast not earning any money from photography, I took advantage of the US Christmas offers together with the favorable Euro/Dollar exchange rate in order to perform this swap at basically no cost. I also bought the 40mm pancake lens and I'm having a hard time taking it off the mount... It is sharp, silent and it will focus just about anywhere you point the camera to.

At some point I would like to post my opinions about the 5d mk2 -> 6d transition, but right now I have very few clicks with the 6d. So I can only write about the things I'm sure of:
  • I have no regrets
  • Easier to carry around due to the smaller size/weight
  • The (silent) shutter sound is ... pardon me ... orgasmic LOL. I just want to click, click and click some more! Silent is even better and that is my default setting
  • Auto-ISO allows you to take snaps without much thinking
  • High-ISO is worlds apart from the 5d, especially after ISO-3200. People shots taken indoors, with dim tungsten light at ISO 12800 look great. Just like that.
  • A bit more responsive in general
  • AF gives you more confidence, especially the center point

After I realized that ISO-12800 is not bad for me, I decided to try out that famous center point. -3EV and all. I don't really know how dark that is supposed to be. I picked the easiest setup I could find: my kitchen in near darkness and aiming at one of those largish wooden cooking spoons (i.e. little contrast if any). Equipped with the 40mm, the 6d nailed focus very fast indeed. 85mm f/1.8 no problem as well. Same story with the 50mm f/1.4 (this one surprised me actually). I would have slept better that night if I had not tried my 24-105 f/4L IS and 70-200 f/4L IS... They could not focus at all.
These dark pictures, were of course, crap. This made me think what meaningful picture would require the -3EV offered by the 6d. I don't know, so I would like to ask you this question. Can anybody submit a nice picture that did require this -3EV capability?

Finally, if I may deviate slightly from the original post, could anyone suggest a compact case just for the 6d and the 40mm pancake? The smallest case I have is a ThinkTank Digital Holster 20 v2.0 and it is just too large for this particular combination...

George.
« Last Edit: January 21, 2014, 06:38:09 PM by gsko »
Canon 6d, 40mm f/2.8, 50mm f/1.4, 85mm f/1.8, 24-105mm f/4L IS, 70-200mm f/4L IS, Sigma 12-24mm f/4.5-5.6 EX DG ASP HSM

canon rumors FORUM

Re: Canon 6D Review: 1+ Year Hands-On [video review]
« Reply #44 on: January 21, 2014, 06:07:26 PM »