April 24, 2014, 01:32:07 PM

Author Topic: Review: Sony A7R With Canon Glass  (Read 5706 times)

Rienzphotoz

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Re: Review: Sony A7R With Canon Glass
« Reply #45 on: January 30, 2014, 06:59:42 AM »
but do you notice a significant improvement in general image quality and DR over your 5D III?
Absolutely! ... but the a7R is even more awesome for landscapes, the difference between that and the 5D MK III is significant.
I plan on getting the a7R as well, sometime before end of June, to be used specifically for landscape photography.
« Last Edit: January 30, 2014, 07:01:24 AM by Rienzphotoz »
Canon 5DMK3 70D G1X | Nikon D610 | Sony a7 | 16-35/2.8LII | 70-200/2.8LISII | 100/2.8LIS | 100-400LIS | 40/2.8 | 50/1.4 | 85/1.8 | 600EX-RTx2 | ST-E3-RT | 24/3.5 T-S | 24-70OSS | 28-300VR | HVL-F43M | Metabones EF adapter | GoPro Black 3+ | DJI Quadcopter | Manfrotto+Gorilap

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Re: Review: Sony A7R With Canon Glass
« Reply #45 on: January 30, 2014, 06:59:42 AM »

DigglerDawg

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Re: Review: Sony A7R With Canon Glass
« Reply #46 on: January 30, 2014, 07:12:23 AM »
Interesting, thanks very much for your replies.

Heh, I always manage to find people who's opinions encourage me to spend more money!  ;D

Rienzphotoz

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Re: Review: Sony A7R With Canon Glass
« Reply #47 on: January 30, 2014, 09:08:22 AM »
I always manage to find people who's opinions encourage me to spend more money!  ;D
Welcome to the club brother ;D
Canon 5DMK3 70D G1X | Nikon D610 | Sony a7 | 16-35/2.8LII | 70-200/2.8LISII | 100/2.8LIS | 100-400LIS | 40/2.8 | 50/1.4 | 85/1.8 | 600EX-RTx2 | ST-E3-RT | 24/3.5 T-S | 24-70OSS | 28-300VR | HVL-F43M | Metabones EF adapter | GoPro Black 3+ | DJI Quadcopter | Manfrotto+Gorilap

lenstrack26

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Re: Review: Sony A7R With Canon Glass
« Reply #48 on: January 30, 2014, 12:25:52 PM »
Hmmm.....What am I missing? Since most of the discussion here centers on landscape photography and DR, why not bracket the exposures and use a restrained HDR approach, or even combine the shots manually in Photoshop to optimize detail?  Granted this would not work perfectly in every situation (windy conditions -- waving plants, or at the coast with moving waves or wildlife in motion), but it might help to level the playing field.  Also, suppressing noise in the shadows with a Photoshop plug-in should help, too. Admittedly an extra step, but better than spending $2400 plus purchasing an unreliable adaptor.  Just sayin'.............
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DigglerDawg

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Re: Review: Sony A7R With Canon Glass
« Reply #49 on: January 30, 2014, 01:24:43 PM »
You kinda answered your own question there. My landscape work often receives the restrained blending/HDR treatment but, being primarily coastal and windy, the less I need to use extra exposures, the better. cloud and water movement, as well as any loose objects in the scene can cause all sorts of problems and bizarre effects after blending. I'm not entirely sure how much the extra DR translates to my style, but for me at least, every stop is gold-dust.

Whether it's worth the financial outlay or not is what I'm trying to figure out. Certainly if I was upgrading from highly inferior, cheaper gear, it'd be worth every penny.

Rienzphotoz

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Re: Review: Sony A7R With Canon Glass
« Reply #50 on: January 31, 2014, 01:43:31 AM »
Hmmm.....What am I missing? Since most of the discussion here centers on landscape photography and DR, why not bracket the exposures and use a restrained HDR approach, or even combine the shots manually in Photoshop to optimize detail?  Granted this would not work perfectly in every situation (windy conditions -- waving plants, or at the coast with moving waves or wildlife in motion), but it might help to level the playing field.  Also, suppressing noise in the shadows with a Photoshop plug-in should help, too. Admittedly an extra step, but better than spending $2400 plus purchasing an unreliable adaptor.  Just sayin'.............
For almost 2 years I have used "restrained HDR approach" with my 5D MK III and I like it very much. However for those who are not interested in HDR (even if it is "restrained") there are several benefits to having a Sony a7R
1. Superior image quality for landscapes
2. Generally landscape photographers tend to travel quite a bit, so they will appreciate the light weight
3. You can use superior optics from Canon or Nikon e.g. Canon EF 14mm f/2.8 prime lens or the Nikon 14-24 f/2.8 lens.
4. It makes for a great back-up body
Considering its strengths, $2300 is a reasonable amount of money (if one can afford it) for the a7R.
Finally, it seems to me that your comment about "unreliable adapter" is based on what you read online, instead of actually having used it ... in addition to owning the Metabones adapter, I have met 8 people (in Australia, Singapore & the Middle East) that own the Metabones adapter (3 Nikon & 5 Canon versions) and all of them are very happy with their excellently performing Metabones adapters ... all products including the most expensive Canon/Nikon lenses will have variation from copy to copy, yes there will be some that will have a problem, but that does not stop people from buying them.
Obviously it is not for everyone ... for photographers who already have some excellent UWA lenses and want to get even better results than their current camera and they can spare/afford $2300+$350 (Camera+adapter), then this is a fantastic camera for landscape.
« Last Edit: January 31, 2014, 01:54:55 AM by Rienzphotoz »
Canon 5DMK3 70D G1X | Nikon D610 | Sony a7 | 16-35/2.8LII | 70-200/2.8LISII | 100/2.8LIS | 100-400LIS | 40/2.8 | 50/1.4 | 85/1.8 | 600EX-RTx2 | ST-E3-RT | 24/3.5 T-S | 24-70OSS | 28-300VR | HVL-F43M | Metabones EF adapter | GoPro Black 3+ | DJI Quadcopter | Manfrotto+Gorilap

jonsjons

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Re: Review: Sony A7R With Canon Glass
« Reply #51 on: February 01, 2014, 04:07:42 PM »
ok, so I've been seriously considering picking up the a7r and metabones adapter for a while now, but I've been waiting for more info on the corner issues with wideangle lenses.  this review is encouraging, but for my landscape work I often shoot REALLY wide - my favorite lenses for this are the Sigma 12-24 and Nikon 14-24.  what do you guys think? does this sound like a good idea?  the a7r would make a great hiking camera, and if image quality is better than my 5d2 it may take over all of the on-tripod duties....

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Re: Review: Sony A7R With Canon Glass
« Reply #51 on: February 01, 2014, 04:07:42 PM »

Albi86

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Re: Review: Sony A7R With Canon Glass
« Reply #52 on: February 03, 2014, 10:07:53 AM »
ok, so I've been seriously considering picking up the a7r and metabones adapter for a while now, but I've been waiting for more info on the corner issues with wideangle lenses.  this review is encouraging, but for my landscape work I often shoot REALLY wide - my favorite lenses for this are the Sigma 12-24 and Nikon 14-24.  what do you guys think? does this sound like a good idea?  the a7r would make a great hiking camera, and if image quality is better than my 5d2 it may take over all of the on-tripod duties....

DSLR lenses usually have no problem at all. The problem with WA can occur with RF lenses.

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Re: Review: Sony A7R With Canon Glass
« Reply #52 on: February 03, 2014, 10:07:53 AM »