October 01, 2014, 04:14:54 AM

Author Topic: track and field photography  (Read 3963 times)

AmbrojaP

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Re: track and field photography
« Reply #30 on: February 04, 2014, 07:20:30 PM »
oh my goodness, i didn't think i would get that much help….i really appreciate all of you taking your time to reply to this message, or question! some of the messages were pretty long, so i really really thank you.
when i shot these i was in the stands, but I'm going to a meet in indiana at notre dame this weekend and I'm going to see if the coach will let me on the field.. with the 2 pic i posted i used a 70-200 but it was the f4, i do have the 70-200 f2, so I'm guessing that is the one i need to be using? someone mentioned who i was trying to get the focus on and yes it is the one in the purple, it is for UNI(university of northern iowa) there colors are very vibrant purple and yellow/goldish color. again, i am so happy i came here. thank you all so much!

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Re: track and field photography
« Reply #30 on: February 04, 2014, 07:20:30 PM »

jdramirez

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Re: track and field photography
« Reply #31 on: February 04, 2014, 08:57:13 PM »
A few things I've learned from shooting Cross Country that might help you:

1) Use a small aperture (but not too small), such as f/2.8 or f/3.5. f/4 is good too. This separates the competitors front he background, which is really important, as meet backgrounds are often very bright, colorful, and distracting from your subjects. 

Agreed.  Play around with a depth of field calculator and see what the DOF is @ 200mm from 50 yards away... and then at 20, then at 10.... etc.  Or... just start shooting at 50 and don't stop until the subject passes you.  Don't be afraid to use the buffer to your advantage until you are more comfortable with photography.

2) Prefocus on a specific spot. A tripod or monopod will help you with this. This is the best method to freezing action that I've found, as it guarantees sharp shots when the runners are in that zone.  Use your 1DX to focus on one spot on the track, and when the runners are roughly 5 feet away from that spot, start mashing the shutter button.

I disagree.  I used to do this with my fuji finepix and my sony point and shoot... but with both a 1Dx and a 5d mkiii, both should easily be able to keep the subject in focus... and if you are dealing with shallow depth of fields... you are going to only have one moment to get the shot...

3) Use at least 1/2000th sec shutter speed. Self explanatory.

Agreed.  If you want to see a little blur... go with 1/200... but it does depend on the speed of your subject. 

4) Put your camera in AI servo mode, it saves time on AF

Agreed...

5) I hope this goes without saying, but don't use the 5D III as your main body. I wouldn't use it at all for action if you can avoid it.

Well... compared to the 1dx... sure... but the mkiii is excellent.  The mkii... sure... but the mkiii...
Upgrade  path.->means the former was sold for the latter.

XS->60D->5d Mkiii:18-55->24-105L:75-300->55-250->70-300->70-200 f4L USM->70-200 f/2.8L USM->70-200 f/2.8L IS Mkii:50 f/1.8->50 f/1.4->100L->85mm f/1.8 USM-> 8mm ->100L & 85L

AmbrojaP

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Re: track and field photography
« Reply #32 on: February 05, 2014, 03:40:11 AM »
@BLFPhoto, those pics were only cropped. No post processing. They were passable by the time I was done but it was a lot of work. But I wanted them clear out of the camera not in ps. Thanks for all your help.

greger

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Re: track and field photography
« Reply #33 on: February 05, 2014, 05:55:59 AM »
I recommend and use Auto ISO, 1,000 sec, TV (shutter priority)centre weighted-metering, AI Servo AF and High Speed
Continuous Drive Mode. On your lens set the IS to Mode 2. This way you can pan keeping your subject in the centre of the frame and if you crop later you can move your subject off centre if this looks better. I use these settings on my 40D using ISO 800 and now my 7D with Auto ISO for BIF. When I was using the 70-200 f4 IS I got pics of BIF that were a long way off. I am surprised how much detail I achieved. After you have these settings saved to one of your C settings on your mode dial it is just a matter of selecting it on your mode dial and Practice,Practise,Practice! Also use back button focus.  I also use Auto White Balance. But this may cause trouble under fluorescent lights and have to be set manually each time you shoot.  Good Luck!
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hd02fatboy

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Re: track and field photography
« Reply #34 on: February 05, 2014, 07:09:52 AM »
Well you definitely got a lot of good advice on camera settings. Aside from all the camera setting, I have two simple and short term recommendations:
You said you were using two camera bodies to shoot the event. I would recommend putting one of the cameras aside for a while and stick with one camera and one lens. This will afford you a to work on the details of learning the settings for the camera and event type you're photographing. The reason I say this is you're going to get slightly different result from the switching back and forth between the two cameras. Concentrate on using one camera body and maybe one lens for a while, preferably the 1DX and 70-200. Try the setting that are recommended on this forum. Practice, review and make adjustments, practice, review and again make adjustments.
The second thing is go to the school or nearby school that has an indoor facility where you can practice the recommendations offered on the forum. Lighting is your worst enemy at indoor sporting events and different at every venue. Practice, practice, practice, don't wait for the actual event. Depending on your availability time, try going two or three times a week, even just for a  1/2 hour session.  You may have to barter with the school to get access to the practices. Be up front with them(the AD, Media person or coaches) , tell them you are shooting track meets at schools X and you need to work on your various camera settings.  In return for you gaining access, maybe offer some photos that turn out good at the practices. You probably don't have many events left in the season and practicing will payoff when you are photographing at the actual competition event. There is a lot less pressure trying to get the the shot right at a practice then waiting to try them out at an actual event. The settings will be different at the different venues, but you'll have a better understanding  when it comes time to make the adjustments needed.  Good Luck and hopefully you post some more pics so these guys can give see your progress and offer more advice if needed. I learn something new every time I come to this forum.

AmbrojaP

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Re: track and field photography
« Reply #35 on: February 10, 2014, 01:07:28 AM »
So this was my first attempt after I received all of your input….it might not be perfect but I can see a huge difference from the first pics I posted and all the help I got from you guys was great!!! I thank you all very much...

AmbrojaP

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Re: track and field photography
« Reply #36 on: February 10, 2014, 01:12:36 AM »
My 8 year old daughter has been learning a few things about photography. I changed all of the settings on camera and let her use the 5dm3, and she took the pics that says "jones kids photography", and the other I took.. Thanks again!

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Re: track and field photography
« Reply #36 on: February 10, 2014, 01:12:36 AM »

Hillsilly

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Re: track and field photography
« Reply #37 on: February 10, 2014, 03:24:12 AM »
Looking good!  I'm a rank amateur myself, so one thing I do occassionally is look at the settings employed by other photographers.  I haven't used a 1Dx, but a quick google search bought up this page (which also largely applies to the 5Diii): -

http://www.sportsshooter.com/news/2678

Of course, you don't have to follow other people's settings exactly.  I find it interesting to see what options other people choose, try to work out why they have made those choices and then decide if those choices are valid for me.  Over time, you learn more about the AF options available to you and you steadily develop the optimal settings for your own use.

Of course, settings are only part of the story.  You need to be in the right place at the right time. This is an interesting read (I assume it's ok to mention a Nikon user?): -

http://www.dslrbodies.com/technique/technique-articles/improving-the-photographer/learning-from-others-sports.html

And if you'd like some inspiration to see  how interesting sports photography can be, this bloke picks up a lot of awards (and he's cool - he uses a Canon): -

http://www.adampretty.com/
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AmbrojaP

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Re: track and field photography
« Reply #38 on: February 10, 2014, 03:29:40 AM »
thank you for your input!!!! i appreciate it!!!!

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Re: track and field photography
« Reply #38 on: February 10, 2014, 03:29:40 AM »