July 22, 2014, 09:33:49 AM

Author Topic: Good lens for hiking  (Read 4362 times)

edurieux

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Good lens for hiking
« on: February 24, 2014, 11:20:38 AM »
Hi everyone,

I'm looking for a lens to do some landscape photography while hiking. I need something very lightweight since I'll use it during hikes of more than 7 days.

My gear currently :
- Canon 6D
- Canon 50mm 1.8
- Canon 24-105L

I saw the 28mm f1.8, and maybe the 24mm f1.4 from Rokinon.
My budget is under 800$, not enough for a 16-35mm ...

What do you think about these lenses ?
My (little) Gear List : Canon 6D, Canon 24-105L, Canon 50mm 1.8L II, Manfrotto 290XPRO3, Vanguard BBH200, Fstop Loka

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Good lens for hiking
« on: February 24, 2014, 11:20:38 AM »

bholliman

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Re: Good lens for hiking
« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2014, 12:42:47 PM »
Hi everyone,

I'm looking for a lens to do some landscape photography while hiking. I need something very lightweight since I'll use it during hikes of more than 7 days.

My gear currently :
- Canon 6D
- Canon 50mm 1.8
- Canon 24-105L

I saw the 28mm f1.8, and maybe the 24mm f1.4 from Rokinon.
My budget is under 800$, not enough for a 16-35mm ...

What do you think about these lenses ?

Your 24-105L is a pretty good lens for extended hikes.  I took mine as my only lens on my 6D for 3-day and 5-day hikes last summer.  A little heavy, but the quality of the images I got made it worthwhile.  The 24-105's nice focal range and IS make it a very good single lens for hiking.

I have since sold my 24-105 and replaced it with a 24-70 2.8 II, which is better optically, but probably not as versatile for extended hikes as the 24-105.  This summer, I plan to take my 24-70 and 100 Macro or 135L for hiking, although we don't have anything beyond day hikes planned at this point.  I'm also considering taking my EOS-M and 18-55 and 22mm lenses along instead of the 6D and see how I like the reduced weight vs. somewhat less capable camera system. 

« Last Edit: February 24, 2014, 12:47:37 PM by bholliman »
Bodies:  6D, EOS-M (22/2 and 18-55)
Lenses: Rokinon 14mm 2.8, 35mm 2.0 IS, 85mm 1.8, 100mm 2.8L IS Macro, 135mm 2.0L, 24-70mm 2.8L II, 70-200mm 2.8L IS II, Extenders: EF 1.4xIII, EF 2xIII ; Flash: ST-E3-RT, 600EX-RT (x3)

sjschall

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Re: Good lens for hiking
« Reply #2 on: February 24, 2014, 12:49:11 PM »
Instead of the Canon 28 1.8 and the Rokinon, might want to throw in the 24 or 28 2.8 IS for consideration. Light and good image quality. The Tamron 28-75 f/2.8 is nice, and is almost half the weight and a fraction of the cost of the Canon 24-70ii.

slclick

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Re: Good lens for hiking
« Reply #3 on: February 24, 2014, 01:05:05 PM »
The Pancake, because Landscape does not necessarily mean UWA.
5d3+ Bower 14, Sigma 24-105, Sigma 35, Canon 40, Canon 70-200L 2.8 ll, Canon 100L Macro, Kenko 1.4 Extender

Albi86

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Re: Good lens for hiking
« Reply #4 on: February 24, 2014, 02:26:26 PM »
Canon 35 f/2 IS.

Small and lightweight enough (imho the most important feature for a long hike), versatile focal length, solid performance, IS for low light.

timmy_650

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Re: Good lens for hiking
« Reply #5 on: February 24, 2014, 02:40:28 PM »
I would say the 24-105 is a good choice. I got a Tamron AF 17-35mm f/2.8-4.0 Di LD SP Aspherical (IF) (older lens) for my 6D it is pretty good. I have used it on many hikes mostly long one day hikes in Zion and Bryce canyons. It runs you about $300-400 so a lot cheaper than the 16-35 it isn't as good (at least my copy) but if you stop it down like you should of landscapes it does well.   

slclick

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Re: Good lens for hiking
« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2014, 03:34:53 PM »
In addition I'll add the Voigtlander 20 Pancake. Besides a really crappy  Sigma and very expensive Zeiss glass there's nothing like it for the price and quality it offers. Any flaws it has are all easily correctable in Post and the color rendition and contrast are far more pleasing than lenses costing many times more such as the Canon zoom UWA duo. $549, easy choice.

I'll add, the 24-105 as a hiking lens? I believe the OP was wanting something compact and light.
5d3+ Bower 14, Sigma 24-105, Sigma 35, Canon 40, Canon 70-200L 2.8 ll, Canon 100L Macro, Kenko 1.4 Extender

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Re: Good lens for hiking
« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2014, 03:34:53 PM »

9VIII

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Re: Good lens for hiking
« Reply #7 on: February 24, 2014, 03:59:50 PM »
The last few times I've gone out intending to use my Sigma 18-35 on the 5D2 I've taken 90% of my shots with the Pancake anyway. That lens transforms my pro-size (with battery grip) camera into something I can easily slip in and out of a bag or backpack.
The Pancake is also very sharp and distortion free. I generally find myself wanting a wider lens indoors and with urban architecture more than outdoors and in the wilderness.
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Sporgon

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Re: Good lens for hiking
« Reply #8 on: February 24, 2014, 05:01:25 PM »
The 28/2.8 IS would be a much better landscape lens than the 28/1.8 as it's sharper mid and edge of frame.

Don Haines

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Re: Good lens for hiking
« Reply #9 on: February 24, 2014, 05:13:21 PM »
The Pancake, because Landscape does not necessarily mean UWA.
And if you do need ultra wide angle, take several pictures and stitch them together when you get home...

And don't forget a spare battery and memory card...
The best camera is the one in your hands

slclick

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Re: Good lens for hiking
« Reply #10 on: February 24, 2014, 06:43:03 PM »
The last few times I've gone out intending to use my Sigma 18-35 on the 5D2 I've taken 90% of my shots with the Pancake anyway. That lens transforms my pro-size (with battery grip) camera into something I can easily slip in and out of a bag or backpack.
The Pancake is also very sharp and distortion free. I generally find myself wanting a wider lens indoors and with urban architecture more than outdoors and in the wilderness.

You're using an aps-c lens on the Mk2? Tell us what FL is usable.
5d3+ Bower 14, Sigma 24-105, Sigma 35, Canon 40, Canon 70-200L 2.8 ll, Canon 100L Macro, Kenko 1.4 Extender

9VIII

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Re: Good lens for hiking
« Reply #11 on: February 24, 2014, 08:55:42 PM »
The last few times I've gone out intending to use my Sigma 18-35 on the 5D2 I've taken 90% of my shots with the Pancake anyway. That lens transforms my pro-size (with battery grip) camera into something I can easily slip in and out of a bag or backpack.
The Pancake is also very sharp and distortion free. I generally find myself wanting a wider lens indoors and with urban architecture more than outdoors and in the wilderness.

You're using an aps-c lens on the Mk2? Tell us what FL is usable.

I find the lens works best at 20mm-22mm.
You basically have to crop the sides unless you want long black triangles in your corners. A 4/3 crop still leaves some black in the corners, and I think it looks best with a 5/4 crop, but if you go all the way to 1/1 crop then you have no vignetting.
At 18mm the image has obvious barrel distortion and at 24mm it has pincushion (getting worse as you zoom in). In the sweet spot the top and bottom of the image is straight but I can still see things warping vertically a bit near the corners so it's not perfect, but for my first wide angle lens I'm pleased with it, and It also happens to be the best crop sensor zoom lens ever made.
« Last Edit: February 24, 2014, 08:58:45 PM by 9VIII »
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slclick

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Re: Good lens for hiking
« Reply #12 on: February 24, 2014, 09:09:12 PM »
The last few times I've gone out intending to use my Sigma 18-35 on the 5D2 I've taken 90% of my shots with the Pancake anyway. That lens transforms my pro-size (with battery grip) camera into something I can easily slip in and out of a bag or backpack.
The Pancake is also very sharp and distortion free. I generally find myself wanting a wider lens indoors and with urban architecture more than outdoors and in the wilderness.

You're using an aps-c lens on the Mk2? Tell us what FL is usable.

I find the lens works best at 20mm-22mm.
You basically have to crop the sides unless you want long black triangles in your corners. A 4/3 crop still leaves some black in the corners, and I think it looks best with a 5/4 crop, but if you go all the way to 1/1 crop then you have no vignetting.
At 18mm the image has obvious barrel distortion and at 24mm it has pincushion (getting worse as you zoom in). In the sweet spot the top and bottom of the image is straight but I can still see things warping vertically a bit near the corners so it's not perfect, but for my first wide angle lens I'm pleased with it, and It also happens to be the best crop sensor zoom lens ever made.

Yep I agree, from what I've seen, if I shot (and if I do in the future) crop I'd have one. I have the other two Art lenses and I am very happy with them. Oh and my Sigma 24-105 is NOT a hiking lens, lol.
5d3+ Bower 14, Sigma 24-105, Sigma 35, Canon 40, Canon 70-200L 2.8 ll, Canon 100L Macro, Kenko 1.4 Extender

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Re: Good lens for hiking
« Reply #12 on: February 24, 2014, 09:09:12 PM »

bholliman

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Re: Good lens for hiking
« Reply #13 on: February 24, 2014, 10:21:07 PM »
The Pancake, because Landscape does not necessarily mean UWA.
Canon 35 f/2 IS.

+1

Either one of these would be a good prime option.  I'm thinking about buying one or both this year and will use for hikes if I do.
Bodies:  6D, EOS-M (22/2 and 18-55)
Lenses: Rokinon 14mm 2.8, 35mm 2.0 IS, 85mm 1.8, 100mm 2.8L IS Macro, 135mm 2.0L, 24-70mm 2.8L II, 70-200mm 2.8L IS II, Extenders: EF 1.4xIII, EF 2xIII ; Flash: ST-E3-RT, 600EX-RT (x3)

edurieux

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Re: Good lens for hiking
« Reply #14 on: February 25, 2014, 08:39:41 AM »
Thanks everybody for your useful answers.

My current lens (24-105L) weights 640g, which is way to much. So I won't consider the Tamron SP AF Di 28-75 f/2.8.

The interesting options are :
- Canon 40 f/2.8 STM: maybe not wide enough, but very compact, very lightweight (130g), and quite cheap. But I have seen reviews that criticized the autofocus and the overall image quality.
- Canon 35 f/2    IS USM : which could be a good FL for landscape with a great aperture. (335g)
- Canon 28 f/2.8 IS USM : good FL and quite lightweight, price quite low (260g)
- Canon 24 f/2.8 IS USM : maybe a bit wide, but weight is good (280g)

I've thrown a look at the voigtlander... What FL could be interesting for landscapes with the 6D ? 20 is maybe a little wide ?

Between the Canon primes, what is the best lens in term of image quality ?
My (little) Gear List : Canon 6D, Canon 24-105L, Canon 50mm 1.8L II, Manfrotto 290XPRO3, Vanguard BBH200, Fstop Loka

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Re: Good lens for hiking
« Reply #14 on: February 25, 2014, 08:39:41 AM »