January 28, 2015, 03:15:14 PM

Author Topic: Voyeurism  (Read 5068 times)

dancook

  • Rebel T5i
  • ****
  • Posts: 109
    • View Profile
Re: Voyeurism
« Reply #15 on: March 15, 2014, 08:05:25 PM »
I have serious GAS issues, all this talk of 'needing' a 50mm - and all I can think of is the otus.. I feel sick  :o - the crisps and coke might not have helped though.

I had been yearning for the 200mm f2 so long, and second hand it's about the same price as the otus...

I could sell the 35mm Zeiss and get the 21mm..  - have 21mm 2.8, 55mm 1.4, 85mm 1.2, 135mm 2...oh GAS sucks :D

canon rumors FORUM

Re: Voyeurism
« Reply #15 on: March 15, 2014, 08:05:25 PM »

dancook

  • Rebel T5i
  • ****
  • Posts: 109
    • View Profile
Re: Voyeurism
« Reply #16 on: March 31, 2014, 06:10:02 AM »
I didn't see the other thread but the thing I find detached from using the longer focal lengths is, the detached feeling! There is no communication with the subject so you are just framing juxtapositions, it is far more difficult to get a compelling image from mere juxtaposition.

Having said that I am all in favour of more photographers and fewer theorists on the forum so welcome  :)

I happened upon the thread again actually.

http://www.canonrumors.com/forum/index.php?topic=13782.15

That is akin to sniping.
Find yourself a good place to hide and wait?
Sorry mate, but this voyeurism, not street photography.
Having the balls to get up close and personal to take the shot in the first place is the whole point of street photography...

ET

Wasn't so tongue-in-cheek I guess :)

dancook

  • Rebel T5i
  • ****
  • Posts: 109
    • View Profile
Re: Voyeurism
« Reply #17 on: September 24, 2014, 05:07:32 PM »


6,7 photo where is that?

Waterloo bridge

canon_guy

  • Rebel T5i
  • ****
  • Posts: 100
    • View Profile
Re: Voyeurism
« Reply #18 on: September 27, 2014, 04:07:13 PM »

AcutancePhotography

  • 1D X
  • *******
  • Posts: 1279
    • View Profile
Re: Voyeurism
« Reply #19 on: September 29, 2014, 08:15:14 AM »
Like most things in photography, it is a balancing act.

With shorter FL's the photographer is part of the street scene and therefore influences the scene.
With longer FL's the photographer is not part of the street scene and has a lower influence of the scene.

It all depends on what the photographer is looking for.  Each will generate a different type of photograph.   

Quote
Having the balls to get up close and personal to take the shot in the first place is the whole point of street photography...

Ugh.  More "if you don't do it my way you are wrong" viewpoints.  Do we really need that in art of photography?
« Last Edit: September 29, 2014, 10:30:54 AM by AcutancePhotography »
I shoot with a Camera Obscura with an optical device attached that refracts and transmits light

sanj

  • 1D X
  • *******
  • Posts: 1801
    • View Profile
Re: Voyeurism
« Reply #20 on: September 29, 2014, 10:26:19 AM »
Some really cool pictures.

Besisika

  • Canon 70D
  • ****
  • Posts: 302
  • 1DX, 5D III
    • View Profile
Re: Voyeurism
« Reply #21 on: September 29, 2014, 10:31:22 AM »
Having said that I am all in favour of more photographers and fewer theorists on the forum so welcome  :)
+1
Like the film said, not because you talked alot about Kung Fu that makes you a Sifu.
Nice series there.

canon rumors FORUM

Re: Voyeurism
« Reply #21 on: September 29, 2014, 10:31:22 AM »

yorgasor

  • EOS M2
  • ****
  • Posts: 224
    • View Profile
Re: Voyeurism
« Reply #22 on: January 03, 2015, 07:29:41 AM »
What I like about the "voyerism" style of photos is that the photographer isn't influencing the person being photographed.  You're catching the person as they really are, they're not posing for you.  People get self conscious when you point a camera right at them, whether they know you or not.
 
This one, I wasn't sitting 5 feet away from this woman, on the steps on a river bank in Singapore.  I had the camera set up on a tripod and I used live view to set up the composition and focus (I was using a 40 yr old 180mm Nikon on my 5D3), but I made as if I was just tinkering with the camera, never getting into a position behind the camera where a normal photographer would be taking a picture.
 
5D3_7387 by yorgasor, on Flickr

It worked so well, I tried it again for these two shots:

5D3_8158 by yorgasor, on Flickr

5D3_9117 by yorgasor, on Flickr

bholliman

  • 1D Mark IV
  • ******
  • Posts: 826
    • View Profile
Re: Voyeurism
« Reply #23 on: January 03, 2015, 08:14:56 AM »
What I like about the "voyerism" style of photos is that the photographer isn't influencing the person being photographed.  You're catching the person as they really are, they're not posing for you.  People get self conscious when you point a camera right at them, whether they know you or not.
 
This one, I wasn't sitting 5 feet away from this woman, on the steps on a river bank in Singapore.  I had the camera set up on a tripod and I used live view to set up the composition and focus (I was using a 40 yr old 180mm Nikon on my 5D3), but I made as if I was just tinkering with the camera, never getting into a position behind the camera where a normal photographer would be taking a picture.
Great shots!  I especially like the first one.  As you pointed out, if the subjects had been aware you were taking a picture, you would not have gotten these terrific, candid pictures.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2015, 11:04:23 AM by bholliman »
Bodies:  6D, EOS-M
EF Lenses: 35mm f/2.0 IS, 100mm f/2.8L IS Macro, 135mm f/2.0L, 16-35mm f/4L IS, 24-70mm f/2.8L II, 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II; EF-M Lenses: 22 f/2, 18-55
Speedlites: ST-E3-RT, 600EX-RT (x3)

canon rumors FORUM

Re: Voyeurism
« Reply #23 on: January 03, 2015, 08:14:56 AM »