September 02, 2014, 04:35:31 PM

Author Topic: technique for hand held larger lens  (Read 3681 times)

surapon

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Re: technique for hand held larger lens
« Reply #30 on: April 17, 2014, 03:38:52 PM »
For shots where timing isn't critical, I've also found it helpful to put my camera on the 2 second timer and hit the button just as I'm finishing my exhale.  I picked up an old Nikon 300mm 2.8 AIS that I've been experimenting with and the technique does get difficult. It also gets heavy after a while, so I know have some 15lb and 25lb pound curling weights I keep at the foot of my desk for regular use.  I've found my stamina improving.   It's really hard to hold the lens still when your arms are tired.

Yes, Sir, Dear Friend, Mr. yorgasor.
This Weekend, I will try your Technique , use 2 Sec. timer, and hitthe shutter after finish my exhale----Great Idea for minimize the  finger's vibration.
Yes, Sir, you are right, 15, 25 Pounds Curling weight are great for my both arms, That I exercise nin every evening past 35 years
Have a great weekend, Sir.
Surapon

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Re: technique for hand held larger lens
« Reply #30 on: April 17, 2014, 03:38:52 PM »

yorgasor

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Re: technique for hand held larger lens
« Reply #31 on: April 18, 2014, 01:33:34 PM »
I'll use the 2 second delay timer at night as well, when I don't have my shutter release cable on me.  This is especially important when you've got a long lens on your camera, as a little button press does make the assembly on the tripod wobble slightly.  I used it last night when I went outside in my yard to get a few night shots of things.  Many scenes look way more interesting at night with a long exposure than during the day:

Basket by yorgasor, on Flickr

Birdhouse by yorgasor, on Flickr

Bird Feeder by yorgasor, on Flickr

surapon

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Re: technique for hand held larger lens
« Reply #32 on: April 18, 2014, 02:35:26 PM »
Ye, Thank you, Sir , dear friend yorgasor,
Wow, Beautiful sharp/ Great Warm Color in the Night time with your trick for hand held shooting. Yes, Sir ,m I will try to night too , By use 2 sec. time delay/ Timer.
Thousand thanks for new / Great Trick.
Surapon.

yorgasor

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Re: technique for hand held larger lens
« Reply #33 on: April 18, 2014, 02:48:34 PM »
I had a hard time framing the bird feeder.  It was so dark, I could barely find it in my viewfinder, let alone make a good composition of it.  I think if I didn't have live view to help with focusing, I wouldn't have been able to get most of these shots to look right.

They were all shot with my Nikon 300mm f/2.8 AIS lens.  I think it's my new favorite night lens :)

mackguyver

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Re: technique for hand held larger lens
« Reply #34 on: April 18, 2014, 02:57:25 PM »
I had a hard time framing the bird feeder.  It was so dark, I could barely find it in my viewfinder, let alone make a good composition of it.  I think if I didn't have live view to help with focusing, I wouldn't have been able to get most of these shots to look right.

They were all shot with my Nikon 300mm f/2.8 AIS lens.  I think it's my new favorite night lens :)
Did someone say Nikon :o  Just kidding, and I really like the shots as well.
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yorgasor

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Re: technique for hand held larger lens
« Reply #35 on: April 18, 2014, 03:24:40 PM »
I had a hard time framing the bird feeder.  It was so dark, I could barely find it in my viewfinder, let alone make a good composition of it.  I think if I didn't have live view to help with focusing, I wouldn't have been able to get most of these shots to look right.

They were all shot with my Nikon 300mm f/2.8 AIS lens.  I think it's my new favorite night lens :)
Did someone say Nikon :o  Just kidding, and I really like the shots as well.

Heh, well, I would've loved to get the Canon 300mm f/2.8 IS II lens.  Maybe when my photography side business takes off I'll score one.  In the meantime, I saved $5k by picking this 30 yr old lens instead.

surapon

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Re: technique for hand held larger lens
« Reply #36 on: April 19, 2014, 12:43:21 PM »
Ye, Thank you, Sir , dear friend yorgasor,
Wow, Beautiful sharp/ Great Warm Color in the Night time with your trick for hand held shooting. Yes, Sir ,m I will try to night too , By use 2 sec. time delay/ Timer.
Thousand thanks for new / Great Trick.
Surapon.


Yes, Thank you, Sir , dear friend yorgasor,
Well, Last night too busy  with my family time, But This Saturday morning at my Home Office, At the Printer room, I close all the Blind and turn off the Lights= Very dark--And Use My dear Canon EOS-M with  18-55 Lens, Set at AV Mode, F= 4.5, and Suck the air out of my Lung, and shoot these photos with 2 sec. Time delay/ Self Timer =  ITS WORKS, SIR= thousand thanks for your great trick, Dear teacher Mr. Yorgasor.
yes, I will copy your tricks in my FB, for all of my Photographers friend to learn from you too.
Thanks again, Sir.
Surapon

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Re: technique for hand held larger lens
« Reply #36 on: April 19, 2014, 12:43:21 PM »

yorgasor

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Re: technique for hand held larger lens
« Reply #37 on: April 19, 2014, 10:56:26 PM »
Ye, Thank you, Sir , dear friend yorgasor,
Wow, Beautiful sharp/ Great Warm Color in the Night time with your trick for hand held shooting. Yes, Sir ,m I will try to night too , By use 2 sec. time delay/ Timer.
Thousand thanks for new / Great Trick.
Surapon.


Yes, Thank you, Sir , dear friend yorgasor,
Well, Last night too busy  with my family time, But This Saturday morning at my Home Office, At the Printer room, I close all the Blind and turn off the Lights= Very dark--And Use My dear Canon EOS-M with  18-55 Lens, Set at AV Mode, F= 4.5, and Suck the air out of my Lung, and shoot these photos with 2 sec. Time delay/ Self Timer =  ITS WORKS, SIR= thousand thanks for your great trick, Dear teacher Mr. Yorgasor.
yes, I will copy your tricks in my FB, for all of my Photographers friend to learn from you too.
Thanks again, Sir.
Surapon

Wow, those are good shots for handheld at 1 second.  I'm glad you found it helpful :)

RustyTheGeek

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Re: technique for hand held larger lens
« Reply #38 on: April 30, 2014, 02:29:24 PM »
I use the rifle stance/breathing technique all the time and wrap my left arm in front of me or rest it on my body to support the camera or lens.  I basically try to become one with the camera to avoid vibration, etc.

Yay surapon!!  I've used bungee cords with a monopod several times!  You and I would have fun comparing DIY contraptions.  Only problem with attaching to a railing like that in public venues is the vibration caused by people shaking the concrete floor or bumping the rail somewhere down the line.  Eventually I stopped using monopods most of the time because I could use the above technique to achieve shots down to 1/15 or 1/30 (worst case) with a zoom lens.  Anything below that just requires a tripod, no other way around it.  And my carbon fiber monopod weighs almost the same as my fancy manfrotto adjustable monopod anyway.
Yes, but what would  surapon  say ??  :D

surapon

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Re: technique for hand held larger lens
« Reply #39 on: April 30, 2014, 03:05:43 PM »
I use the rifle stance/breathing technique all the time and wrap my left arm in front of me or rest it on my body to support the camera or lens.  I basically try to become one with the camera to avoid vibration, etc.

Yay surapon!!  I've used bungee cords with a monopod several times!  You and I would have fun comparing DIY contraptions.  Only problem with attaching to a railing like that in public venues is the vibration caused by people shaking the concrete floor or bumping the rail somewhere down the line.  Eventually I stopped using monopods most of the time because I could use the above technique to achieve shots down to 1/15 or 1/30 (worst case) with a zoom lens.  Anything below that just requires a tripod, no other way around it.  And my carbon fiber monopod weighs almost the same as my fancy manfrotto adjustable monopod anyway.

Dear Mr. RustyTheGeek -----Welcome to Club, MacGyver's Club ( TV. Movie) and our friend  Mr. Mackguyer's Club too==We all use the duct tape and Love Bungee cords, and try to solve the problems and make the better mouse trap.
Have a Great Day , Sir.
Surapon,.
PS. I tired my Monopod and Big Lens to the rand Rail, Yes, I know  some one will grab the Rand rail and make vibration, That Why I set IS. All the time, although on the monopod---It solve my Problem of that Vibration.

yorgasor

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Re: technique for hand held larger lens
« Reply #40 on: June 11, 2014, 10:35:07 PM »
Dear Friends.
Sorry, I do not have 300 mm. yet, But for my dear 600mm. + 2X, I must use Monopod and  Elastic Rops to tie the monopods to the Metal Hand rails for shoot the Baseball at the Baseball stadium,  half miles away( ?) from the  Homebase. Yes, I have no choice, if I do not use the heavy weight Tripods.
Enjoy.
Surapon

Surapon,

Yesterday, a few photographers from a local photography club shot a high school girls' softball game.  We were told to bring a small step ladder or 5 gallon bucket to stand on so we could shoot over the fence.  I was really excited to finally get a chance to try out the technique of attaching a tripod to the fence.  All the other guys looked on jealously as I had my big Nikon 300mm AIS lens w/ canon 1.4x extender on a tripod attached to the fence, locked on the home plate, leaving me open to use my other camera to shoot the action on the field.  One guy said, "Wow, I've been shooting high school games for 20 years, and I've never seen that.  You've really come prepared!"  "You must be a professional!"

So, thanks for making me look good :)

5D3_0752 by yorgasor, on Flickr

5D3_0792 by yorgasor, on Flickr

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jrista

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Re: technique for hand held larger lens
« Reply #41 on: June 12, 2014, 12:07:57 AM »
Check out the third photo on this page (of Arthur Morris) - that's how I hold my lenses, if they have feet. 

Me, too, except I try not to stick my tongue out like that.   :P

Ah! But you see, the tongue is part of the whole Morris Special Technique. It acts like a wind sensor, giving you early cues as to direction and strength, allowing you to preemptively combat wind pressure. Besides, it makes you look like a goofball, so the birds won't be afraid. :D You GOTTA stick the tongue out! :P
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wickidwombat

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Re: technique for hand held larger lens
« Reply #42 on: June 12, 2014, 01:42:28 AM »
Surapon, you truly are a great problem solver and I would never have guessed that you could get shots like that from a spot like that in the stadium.  Great shots and great way to use the railing and bungee cords!


Thank you, Sir dear friend Mr. mackguyver.
Yes, Bungee cords, Swiss army knife  and Big strong duct tape with me all of my trip------I have learn from you in the TV. show, Mr. Macgyver in 1985 to 1992 on ABC. and I never miss  the shows.
Yes, Sir, I have Canon 1.4X  II and Canon  2X II with me on that trip.
Have a great Weekend, Sir.
Surapon
That is where my nickname/username comes from and I used to love the show as well.  I'm still creative in like the character in many areas of my life, but sadly photography gear is not one of them.  I couldn't come close to keeping up with you, anyways :)  Have a great weekend as well!

I actually think that the tv show copied surapon! I hope you're getting royalties mate ;)
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Re: technique for hand held larger lens
« Reply #42 on: June 12, 2014, 01:42:28 AM »

Roo

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Re: technique for hand held larger lens
« Reply #43 on: June 12, 2014, 06:26:13 AM »
Check out the third photo on this page (of Arthur Morris) - that's how I hold my lenses, if they have feet. 

Me, too, except I try not to stick my tongue out like that.   :P

Ah! But you see, the tongue is part of the whole Morris Special Technique. It acts like a wind sensor, giving you early cues as to direction and strength, allowing you to preemptively combat wind pressure. Besides, it makes you look like a goofball, so the birds won't be afraid. :D You GOTTA stick the tongue out! :P

I'm glad you cleared that up.  I was thinking it might be a good technique to fine tune my balance ;D
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pwp

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Re: technique for hand held larger lens
« Reply #44 on: June 12, 2014, 07:40:05 AM »
Using my 300 4 L IS with either a crop body or 6d I get blur. I correct this by leaning my left shoulder against something. Do not have same issue with the 70 200 L. I do not want to always use a monopod as it is often getting in the way.
John the biggest cause of image blur when using longer lenses is camera shake. Go back and check the exif/metadata in the shots where you missed focus and check the shutter speed. Long lenses need a very steady hand, and preferably a monopod. Also, accurate positioning of focus points can be critical. The 300 f/4is is a very sharp lens, even wide open. Get your shutter speeds up!

When using long glass I'll routinely shoot wide open and adjust iso to get an appropriate, fast shutter speed. Anything where there is action involved will benefit from shutter speeds of over 1/1000th. It's not as fast as you'd expect...in peak moments in fast action sports, you'll even find a touch of motion blur in a perfectly focused shot.

-pw

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Re: technique for hand held larger lens
« Reply #44 on: June 12, 2014, 07:40:05 AM »