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Author Topic: Laptop Editing - Best Setup  (Read 24291 times)

MichaelHodges

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Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #30 on: August 23, 2014, 11:32:37 PM »
]
If viewing angles are an issue then IPS primary advantage over TN screens is that it has better viewing angles... And that's pretty much it.

That's it?  I would describe the color and contrasting completely changing when you move your head an inch a bit more than "that's it". Id say it's ruining your entire picture.

Quote
A High-end laptop TN screens are good enough for image processing’s as well as mostly people always uses optimal viewing angle.

I would politely disagree. You never see the proper color and contrast on a TN panel. The color and contrast is always shifting, unless you're a robot who never moves his head.

IMHO, laptop sales are sagging because people look at an iPad and love it. Then they look at a TN laptop and get grossed out.  Why should people who only post to social media have a better LCD screen than a content creator on a laptop? It makes no sense.

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Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #30 on: August 23, 2014, 11:32:37 PM »

drjlo

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Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #31 on: August 24, 2014, 01:27:08 AM »

Are you sure about that on all systems? I think that is how it used to work.

I personally believe that depending on what card you have and what system you have it does switch automatically.

I know mine does.

Nvidia Optimus, as it comes, does switch automatically, but one can go into Nvidia control panel and select to use the Nvidia card for each particular program. 
I have tried this with Photoshop in past, and unless one is doing 3D rendering, Nvidia card does not speed things up for usual 2D photo editing.  Using the Nvidia card does make the laptop run hotter, resulting in the fan kicking in faster and louder  :'(

MxM

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Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #32 on: August 24, 2014, 02:37:03 AM »
Quote
Nvidia Optimus, as it comes, does switch automatically, but one can go into Nvidia control panel and select to use the Nvidia card for each particular program. 
I have tried this with Photoshop in past, and unless one is doing 3D rendering, Nvidia card does not speed things up for usual 2D photo editing.  Using the Nvidia card does make the laptop run hotter, resulting in the fan kicking in faster and louder  :'(

Yes and No, there are some misunderstandings about Optimus. The application or game is recognized by the nvidia software/profiles, and switch to the recommended GPU, but it stays on that GPU until you exit your application.

For example: You start up your computer and the Windows GUI is always using your onboard (intel) GPU! When you decided to start an application or game, and that's were it wil switch to the recommende/preferred GPU when the program is recognized (profiles). When you exit the application or game optimus switch automatically (there you have it!) back to your onboard GPU. Try to run WEI (Windows Experiance Index) it would allways run on your onboard GPU.

Photoshop CS6 and CC does benefit from the much stronger nvidia GPU against the onboard intel. True you won't notice it when painting or fill a color, but more and more actions or plugin's use complex maths (OpenGL/OpenCL/Cuda) and that is were the nvidia GPU really shines!

I hope this clears it up for you... It does not change dynamically/automatically between your onboard or dedicated GPU while in your application or game.
« Last Edit: August 24, 2014, 03:08:16 AM by MxM »

wsmith96

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Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #33 on: August 24, 2014, 02:56:54 AM »
You may want to consider HP's Zbooks.   I can vouch for the Zbook15 as I have one for work - the thing is a powerhouse and you can get the dreamcolor display on them too if you need a higher end screen.
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expatinasia

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Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #34 on: August 27, 2014, 01:55:24 AM »
Using the Nvidia card does make the laptop run hotter, resulting in the fan kicking in faster and louder  :'(

That is when getting a laptop that is made for such high performance pays off. Here in Asia Pacific I am nearly always working in hot temperatures, and when I render HD videos and do other stuff that pushes the laptop, it never overheats and I hardly ever hear any noise from the fans (and I still have not cleaned the fans out yet, which will make them even quieter - though I wonder if that is even possible!). It is this amazing build quality, that makes me recommend the Dell Precision range - especially the M6XX - as they are built like tanks and are imho, the best available on the market.

The application or game is recognized by the nvidia software/profiles, and switch to the recommended GPU, but it stays on that GPU until you exit your application.

For example: You start up your computer and the Windows GUI is always using your onboard (intel) GPU! When you decided to start an application or game, and that's were it wil switch to the recommende/preferred GPU when the program is recognized (profiles). When you exit the application or game optimus switch automatically (there you have it!) back to your onboard GPU. Try to run WEI (Windows Experiance Index) it would allways run on your onboard GPU.

Photoshop CS6 and CC does benefit from the much stronger nvidia GPU against the onboard intel. True you won't notice it when painting or fill a color, but more and more actions or plugin's use complex maths (OpenGL/OpenCL/Cuda) and that is were the nvidia GPU really shines!

I hope this clears it up for you... It does not change dynamically/automatically between your onboard or dedicated GPU while in your application or game.

Good explanation, MXM. Thanks.
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HenryS

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Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #35 on: August 27, 2014, 04:25:34 AM »
Hello,
I use 2 Laptops for editing: a dell Precision M 4700 and a Lenovo Thinkpad x230.
Thinkpad: i5 2310M 8gb 250gb msata ssd 500gb hdd 12" IPS screen. I use this laptop for mobile editing for example if a client needs some images quickly for Facebook upload etc. The screen is a bit off and cuts the blacks but its far better than most non ips screens. This laptop is very portable, has a decent battery life and is capable of handling Lightroom. I plan to upgrade  this machine to 16gb ram sometime.

Precision M4700: i7 quad, 16gb, 250gb msata ssd, 1tb hdd, 15" IPS screen. I use this one at home or for studio work and it's fast! Also the display is far better. Just not that portable, I wouldn't like to carry that one with me all day.

Henry
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Zv

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Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #36 on: August 27, 2014, 06:10:40 AM »
Why do you need a new one, if your is 1-yr old and pretty fast?
I'm using a VAIO Z, which is about 3 or may be even 4 years old. It used to be a top-range, so it's pretty competitive now with i7-2660k, 8 gigs of ram and 256Gb SSD drive(RAID0 of two 128GB sticks).

The only thing you need for photography you need is an external display. Get yourself a nice 27" IPS DELL and have fun.

This is very close to what I have too - a 3 yr old Vaio that I upped to Crucial 8Gb RAM and added a Samsung 500Gb SSD. The biggest improvement that came though was when I bought a 22 inch external display! The original 16.4" TN screen is totally unacceptable for photo editing so I can't recommend anything that doesn't have an IPS display. So many headaches were due to the poor screen on my laptop.

My laptop is now my desktop and doesn't move from the desk.  :(
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Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #36 on: August 27, 2014, 06:10:40 AM »

ray5

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Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #37 on: August 27, 2014, 07:18:18 AM »
Why do you need a new one, if your is 1-yr old and pretty fast?
I'm using a VAIO Z, which is about 3 or may be even 4 years old. It used to be a top-range, so it's pretty competitive now with i7-2660k, 8 gigs of ram and 256Gb SSD drive(RAID0 of two 128GB sticks).

The only thing you need for photography you need is an external display. Get yourself a nice 27" IPS DELL and have fun.

This is very close to what I have too - a 3 yr old Vaio that I upped to Crucial 8Gb RAM and added a Samsung 500Gb SSD. The biggest improvement that came though was when I bought a 22 inch external display! The original 16.4" TN screen is totally unacceptable for photo editing so I can't recommend anything that doesn't have an IPS display. So many headaches were due to the poor screen on my laptop.

My laptop is now my desktop and doesn't move from the desk.  :(

I am going to do the same but don't have a external display picked yet. I work exclusively from a 2010 Macbook Pro. Any suggestions?

Zv

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Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #38 on: August 27, 2014, 08:55:35 AM »
Why do you need a new one, if your is 1-yr old and pretty fast?
I'm using a VAIO Z, which is about 3 or may be even 4 years old. It used to be a top-range, so it's pretty competitive now with i7-2660k, 8 gigs of ram and 256Gb SSD drive(RAID0 of two 128GB sticks).

The only thing you need for photography you need is an external display. Get yourself a nice 27" IPS DELL and have fun.

This is very close to what I have too - a 3 yr old Vaio that I upped to Crucial 8Gb RAM and added a Samsung 500Gb SSD. The biggest improvement that came though was when I bought a 22 inch external display! The original 16.4" TN screen is totally unacceptable for photo editing so I can't recommend anything that doesn't have an IPS display. So many headaches were due to the poor screen on my laptop.

My laptop is now my desktop and doesn't move from the desk.  :(

I am going to do the same but don't have a external display picked yet. I work exclusively from a 2010 Macbook Pro. Any suggestions?

I'm prob not the best person here to give advice on displays tbh. I know didly squat about screens. The one I have is an LG 22EA53. I bought it because it was cheap and got pretty good reviews. I calibrated it using Xrite i1 Display Pro. I'm not that fussy about getting things perfect, just wanted something simple but good. Fits the bill.

I would go for the 23" as the price difference isn't much. I got mine last year for just over $100 on amazon. I can't believe I never thought of getting one before. I just asssumed they'd be expensive but then again I put down thousands on camera gear! It's funny how you can justify a lens purchase much easier than other stuff!

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RustyTheGeek

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Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #39 on: August 27, 2014, 09:09:21 AM »
I'm a little late to the party here but let me address some of the points in a general sense without naming names.

Laptops (Apple or PC) are always a compromise compared to a good desktop unit with a high end IPS display.  And I agree with many who say gaming laptops are overkill.  A gaming laptop is purposed for a completely different use dependent on 3D video performance.  For photography, it's all about the display and CPU/RAM/SSD and protecting the data.

Avoid TN Displays, get IPS.  Most everyone agrees on that and the OP wants the BEST, not a compromise to save $$.

Durability - Many have said they went out and looked at laptops to compare.  Most laptops at retail stores are not built to the standards that business line laptops are.  Lenovo Thinkpads vs Lenovo Ideapad.  DELL Precision/Latitude vs Inspiron.  HP ProBook/Elitebook vs Envy/Pavilion.  The major name business lines are built like tanks for enterprise traveling workforces.  The retail lines are built for individuals who don't know the difference and want shiny plastic.

Display, CPU, RAM, SSD all matter, but not video.  After that, it's just a difference in configuration.

Macbooks aren't better, they are just different (and overpriced)They won't last longer.  They have the exact same hardware inside built by the same manufacturers.  If you like Mac, buy it.  Heck, you can even install Windows on it if you want.  But macs don't have much in the way of versatility.  They are pretty limited for real world use with abbreviated ports, no docking or removable parts like batteries, optical drives, etc.  And I HATE GLOSSY HIGH CONTRAST DISPLAYS.  But to each their own.

Workstation level business laptops are expensive but they offer multiple custom configurations like drives with RAID, mSATA and other options including replacing the optical drive with even more storage, etc.  So you can create a custom drive setup that protects your images and even backs them up internally without the need for external drives hanging off, etc.  This is one area where macs and other retail offerings are totally lost.  You can also get custom docks that you can connect at your desk with everything including multiple displays.

What would I buy?  The Thinkpad W series from a W520 on up are excellent.  DELL and HP also have great workstation level IPS offerings that are similar.  These are serious workstation replacement products that are much more durable and powerful than retail products (and macs).  You could get a refurbished unit for a lot less and still enjoy everything you need including good performance and IPS display.

I'm not familiar with the Acer unit that has been mentioned here heavily but someone is pretty impressed with it so it's probably worth a look.  It's still a retail laptop however so I'm a little worried about the durability.

Finally, I saw a comment about why shouldn't all devices have the better IPS displays?  Well, it's mostly about money and profit.  IPS is more expensive and most devices are built for profit for a market that doesn't know the difference and doesn't care.  Most of the market wants a cheaper device with specs they think matter, like hard drive capacity and fancy names on the audio chip.  An iPad costs a TON of money and gives Apple something like a million percent profit margin to boot.

OP - Good luck finding what you want.  Please stay in touch here and let us know what you decide.  Again, my suggestion is to go with a Thinkpad W series or one of the DELL or HP business offerings.
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RustyTheGeek

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Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #40 on: August 27, 2014, 09:13:04 AM »
Why do you need a new one, if your is 1-yr old and pretty fast?
I'm using a VAIO Z, which is about 3 or may be even 4 years old. It used to be a top-range, so it's pretty competitive now with i7-2660k, 8 gigs of ram and 256Gb SSD drive(RAID0 of two 128GB sticks).

The only thing you need for photography you need is an external display. Get yourself a nice 27" IPS DELL and have fun.

This is very close to what I have too - a 3 yr old Vaio that I upped to Crucial 8Gb RAM and added a Samsung 500Gb SSD. The biggest improvement that came though was when I bought a 22 inch external display! The original 16.4" TN screen is totally unacceptable for photo editing so I can't recommend anything that doesn't have an IPS display. So many headaches were due to the poor screen on my laptop.

My laptop is now my desktop and doesn't move from the desk.  :(

I am going to do the same but don't have a external display picked yet. I work exclusively from a 2010 Macbook Pro. Any suggestions?

There are other threads that talk about displays.  (I'm bad about hijacking threads myself sometimes.)  So I'll say that the DELL U2410 and U2711 are ideal IPS displays but there are others.  Read the other threads and you'll learn more.
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AttackMonkey

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Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #41 on: August 27, 2014, 09:24:41 AM »
I have a 17" desktop replacement which is essentially a Clevo chassis that's been heavily customised. I think the main US seller of these is Sager, but if you're based elsewhere, google "Clevo Resellers" and you'll find local suppliers. My system is 6 years old, has 16GB of RAM, 1.5TB of storage spread across three drives, and more ports than you can shake a stick at. I went for the highest end model, which is effectively a desktop system in a very chunky laptop box. The screen is good, and it's by far and away the best laptop that I've ever owned. However, it's HEAVY (about 8-9KG including power brick), I cycle 20 miles a day with it strapped to my back, and even though I'm pretty fit, I think it's time to get something less crazy and a bit easier on my spine.

Check out some of the smaller Clevo based systems, they're highly configurable, and they can easily be upgraded down the line if you need to. They aren't pretty, but they're all built like tanks, and they perform extremely well.

RustyTheGeek

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Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #42 on: August 27, 2014, 09:35:01 AM »
I have a 17" desktop replacement which is essentially a Clevo chassis that's been heavily customised. I think the main US seller of these is Sager, but if you're based elsewhere, google "Clevo Resellers" and you'll find local suppliers. My system is 6 years old, has 16GB of RAM, 1.5TB of storage spread across three drives, and more ports than you can shake a stick at. I went for the highest end model, which is effectively a desktop system in a very chunky laptop box. The screen is good, and it's by far and away the best laptop that I've ever owned. However, it's HEAVY (about 8-9KG including power brick), I cycle 20 miles a day with it strapped to my back, and even though I'm pretty fit, I think it's time to get something less crazy and a bit easier on my spine.

Check out some of the smaller Clevo based systems, they're highly configurable, and they can easily be upgraded down the line if you need to. They aren't pretty, but they're all built like tanks, and they perform extremely well.

Wow!  Sager!  I haven't seen that name in a LONG TIME!
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Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #42 on: August 27, 2014, 09:35:01 AM »

beckstoy

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Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #43 on: August 27, 2014, 10:16:09 AM »
I'm a little late to the party here but let me address some of the points in a general sense without naming names.

Laptops (Apple or PC) are always a compromise compared to a good desktop unit with a high end IPS display.  And I agree with many who say gaming laptops are overkill.  A gaming laptop is purposed for a completely different use dependent on 3D video performance.  For photography, it's all about the display and CPU/RAM/SSD and protecting the data.

Avoid TN Displays, get IPS.  Most everyone agrees on that and the OP wants the BEST, not a compromise to save $$.

Durability - Many have said they went out and looked at laptops to compare.  Most laptops at retail stores are not built to the standards that business line laptops are.  Lenovo Thinkpads vs Lenovo Ideapad.  DELL Precision/Latitude vs Inspiron.  HP ProBook/Elitebook vs Envy/Pavilion.  The major name business lines are built like tanks for enterprise traveling workforces.  The retail lines are built for individuals who don't know the difference and want shiny plastic.

Display, CPU, RAM, SSD all matter, but not video.  After that, it's just a difference in configuration.

Macbooks aren't better, they are just different (and overpriced)They won't last longer.  They have the exact same hardware inside built by the same manufacturers.  If you like Mac, buy it.  Heck, you can even install Windows on it if you want.  But macs don't have much in the way of versatility.  They are pretty limited for real world use with abbreviated ports, no docking or removable parts like batteries, optical drives, etc.  And I HATE GLOSSY HIGH CONTRAST DISPLAYS.  But to each their own.

Workstation level business laptops are expensive but they offer multiple custom configurations like drives with RAID, mSATA and other options including replacing the optical drive with even more storage, etc.  So you can create a custom drive setup that protects your images and even backs them up internally without the need for external drives hanging off, etc.  This is one area where macs and other retail offerings are totally lost.  You can also get custom docks that you can connect at your desk with everything including multiple displays.

What would I buy?  The Thinkpad W series from a W520 on up are excellent.  DELL and HP also have great workstation level IPS offerings that are similar.  These are serious workstation replacement products that are much more durable and powerful than retail products (and macs).  You could get a refurbished unit for a lot less and still enjoy everything you need including good performance and IPS display.

I'm not familiar with the Acer unit that has been mentioned here heavily but someone is pretty impressed with it so it's probably worth a look.  It's still a retail laptop however so I'm a little worried about the durability.

Finally, I saw a comment about why shouldn't all devices have the better IPS displays?  Well, it's mostly about money and profit.  IPS is more expensive and most devices are built for profit for a market that doesn't know the difference and doesn't care.  Most of the market wants a cheaper device with specs they think matter, like hard drive capacity and fancy names on the audio chip.  An iPad costs a TON of money and gives Apple something like a million percent profit margin to boot.

OP - Good luck finding what you want.  Please stay in touch here and let us know what you decide.  Again, my suggestion is to go with a Thinkpad W series or one of the DELL or HP business offerings.

Thanks!  LOTS of uselful stuff here.  I'm re-thinking my whole approach.
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RustyTheGeek

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Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #44 on: August 27, 2014, 11:36:02 AM »
Another big reason I prefer Thinkpads - they have the best keyboards in the business.  Also, ease of setup using the ThinkVantage Tools and System Update utility.
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Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #44 on: August 27, 2014, 11:36:02 AM »