December 20, 2014, 08:21:57 PM

Author Topic: The client doesn't like your picture, while you love it  (Read 5868 times)

YuengLinger

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Re: The client doesn't like your picture, while you love it
« Reply #30 on: May 12, 2014, 10:28:18 AM »
"If the client changes their mind after the meeting, fails to tell you, and has such comments after the fact, show them those answers."

I'm not sure playing gotcha with clients is good in the long run, satisfying as it may be with the occasional difficult ones...

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Re: The client doesn't like your picture, while you love it
« Reply #30 on: May 12, 2014, 10:28:18 AM »

TeT

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Re: The client doesn't like your picture, while you love it
« Reply #31 on: May 12, 2014, 10:58:33 AM »
just a note / query on your approach to this event. How big was your team?

Its too big an event for one photographer to capture enough varied images, especially of volunteers who are spread out over a vast area.

You should have had a TEAM over a period of 2 days covering setup through dismantle...


Its not that much different than a giant wedding shoot...

Act444

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Re: The client doesn't like your picture, while you love it
« Reply #32 on: May 12, 2014, 11:33:52 AM »
I haven't had this exact experience, but there have been many times where people pick different shots out of a set than I would have. Or, a shot that I find to be just OK ends up being favorited. Sometimes it's fascinating. We all have different tastes ;)

Actionpix

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Re: The client doesn't like your picture, while you love it
« Reply #33 on: May 12, 2014, 11:57:04 AM »
Not with a client but with a photo challenge. Make a original overview. So I parachuted over the target to get my shot. Comment; "Looks like you were hanging from a parachute." Duh.

mackguyver

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Re: The client doesn't like your picture, while you love it
« Reply #34 on: May 12, 2014, 12:03:41 PM »
Welcome to paid photography ;).  I say that in jest, but the client (nearly) always gives vague guidance, but has a very specific concept in their mind's eye.  The way I get around it is to take numerous photos of the same subject with a variety of lenses and looks (shallow DOF, deep DOF, motion blur, freeze frame, etc., etc.) which gives them a lot to choose from.  I pick out the best of each type of shot, send it to them, and prepare for their reaction.  9 times out of 10, they choose what I feel is the "worst" photo, but every now and then we share the same taste and they pick my favorite.  As you get to know your clients better, you get a feel for their tastes, but it's tough when they are a new client. 

Also, I say nearly always because an occasional client will give you a veritable blue print of what they want.  I use the same strategy with them, and guess what, at least half of the time, they prefer one of my "alternates" to the one they commissioned me to take.

If you are serious about doing commercial work, it's best to prepare yourself to be offended by clients and expect them to hate your favorites and love your least favorite work.

The silver lining is that you get paid, and guess what happens to the photos that clients don't like?  You use them to promote yourself and attract more clients who love the photos you post (which are ironically the ones your other clients didn't like). :)

As for me, I really like the photo and agree that it "tells the story" very well.

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Re: The client doesn't like your picture, while you love it
« Reply #35 on: May 12, 2014, 12:06:37 PM »
just a note / query on your approach to this event. How big was your team?

Its too big an event for one photographer to capture enough varied images, especially of volunteers who are spread out over a vast area.

You should have had a TEAM over a period of 2 days covering setup through dismantle...


Its not that much different than a giant wedding shoot...

Errrrr........ You are joking....right ?

How is something like this ever going to be viable if you had to put a team of photographers on it ?   ???

dcschooley

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Re: The client doesn't like your picture, while you love it
« Reply #36 on: May 12, 2014, 02:33:06 PM »
In the immortal word of Monte Zucker "Beauty is in the eye of the checkbook holder."

The reason a "client" does not like an image has never hurt my feelings but was a message to me that I was not on their wavelength.


You refer to this affair as a dissatisfied client situation. Once the the consumer of your work is identified as the client it becomes a business situation. What you love is irrelevant.

While there is some disagreement on this thread as to how to handle it my opinion is that you have to address it as a business deal as you were approached because of your skill. Their dissatisfaction will redound back to you in poor word of mouth so as a purely defensive move you have to invest even more non-revenue generating effort to protect your local reputation.

The real benefit to you in this situation is the education received.


1. A client is a client, paid work or not. A failure to determine and meet the client's needs is the fault of whoever is providing the service, be it photography or something else. The facts of what happened might say something else, but that doesn't matter.

2. The client's decision to not use a particular photograph does not make them ungrateful, unappreciative, or too clueless to understand your artistry; see #1

3. I agree with the client in this case. The OP's photograph is not very good as presented. The runner is in focus, and the two volunteers on the right are doing something interesting, so those parts are fine, The left side of the photograph is a mess and it damages the photograph. You have a disembodied, out-of-focus red arm coming in from the side holding up a blurry cup dissimilar from the one the runner is carrying. The red arm partially obscures a person in bright orange, who might be doing something interesting, but we can't tell. The runners in the background are basically ok except for being somewhat blocked by the orange person and the red arm. Cropping the image in from the left does all sorts of good. Put the crop in between the blurry cup and the runner. The story is now the interaction between the runner and the two volunteers on the right, one of whom is holding the same type of cup as the runner and implying where the runner got his drink.

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Re: The client doesn't like your picture, while you love it
« Reply #36 on: May 12, 2014, 02:33:06 PM »

AcutancePhotography

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Re: The client doesn't like your picture, while you love it
« Reply #37 on: May 12, 2014, 03:02:17 PM »

1. A client is a client, paid work or not. A failure to determine and meet the client's needs is the fault of whoever is providing the service, be it photography or something else. ...

If the photographer does not have a clear understanding of what the client wants, I agee that it is the photographer's responsibility to engage the client further.  The proper interrogation of clients, I feel, is a valuable skill for anyone who takes pictures for "someone else".

Never ever accept a client saying "oh, just take some pictures, you know what we want."  yikes!

Once you agree to take pictures for someone else, it stops being what the photographer thinks would be nice, and more what the client thinks will be nice.  The skill of the photographer is in the taking of what the client wants and actually being able to produce it.  Anyone can take a picture the way they want to.  Taking a picture the way someone else wants, that's what makes this type of photography ... interesting.  ;D

Back to the OP's photograph.  It is always risky to have the subject of the picture (in your case, volunteers) out of focus.  It can work but for a lot of people it doesn't.

Good luck with it.  You got a lotta advice in this thread... some of it may actually be good.   ;D ;D
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procentje20

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Re: The client doesn't like your picture, while you love it
« Reply #38 on: May 13, 2014, 04:35:17 AM »
I love the discussion that sprung from this. The opinions couldnt be further apart. From "the client is an ***" to "you should have brought a team"

My conclusion is this: I should have better understood the clients wishes. It doesn't have anything to do with taste, technique or opportunity.

However, I didn't show you any of the pictures they did like, as I think it is irrelevant to the original post. Which is about the picture I like, and they didn't. The fact that they ended up with a bunch of pretty pictures for their site is besides the point.

All in all that was a successful shoot. I didn't have to shoot the sports, as there was a team of pro photogs for that, and a professional videographer with a boat and motorcycle to get up close. No way I could top that.

But keep the comments coming. I'm not easily offended by critique :)
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Hillsilly

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Re: The client doesn't like your picture, while you love it
« Reply #39 on: May 13, 2014, 06:22:39 AM »
If you like critique, I like your image a lot.  As part of your collection from the day, I think it would work very well.  But if you gave it to me as "THE" image that encapsulates the qualities and dedication of the volunteers, then I'd side with the organiser.  My attention is drawn to the athlete, not the volunteers.  Its a good supporting image, but wouldn't fit my criteria for being the best image. 

Anyway, good to know its not just me that has differences of opinion with clients.  ALL my clients know so much more about what I do and how I should do it that I wonder why I even bother turning up to work. 

BTW, bit surprised about some of the comments from others about volunteers.  Nearly every event relies upon volunteers, and I don't see any problem in giving them a lot of credit for taking part.  Even if they are the local business people trying to show how civic minded they are for a bit of self promotion - great!  We should be encouraging more of it.   Across the world, there is a steady decline in volunteers, and that's a bit sad.  No volunteers = no events (or ridiculously high entry fees).  If the solution is as simple as few good photos, let's get out there and do it.
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AcutancePhotography

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Re: The client doesn't like your picture, while you love it
« Reply #40 on: May 14, 2014, 03:31:05 PM »
But keep the comments coming. I'm not easily offended by critique :)

Sheesh, way to take the fun out of it.   :D
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Re: The client doesn't like your picture, while you love it
« Reply #40 on: May 14, 2014, 03:31:05 PM »