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Author Topic: Your Go To Portrait Lens?  (Read 14595 times)

wopbv4

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Re: Your Go To Portrait Lens?
« Reply #30 on: November 20, 2011, 11:09:27 PM »
100mm EF f/2.8L IS USM Macro

This may sound strange, but it is not only a macro, but also a  lens with a relatively wide aperture, superb image quality, fast AF and  impressive IS. I just love this lens for head/shoulder pictures
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Re: Your Go To Portrait Lens?
« Reply #30 on: November 20, 2011, 11:09:27 PM »

wickidwombat

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Re: Your Go To Portrait Lens?
« Reply #31 on: November 21, 2011, 05:33:22 AM »
100mm EF f/2.8L IS USM Macro

This may sound strange, but it is not only a macro, but also a  lens with a relatively wide aperture, superb image quality, fast AF and  impressive IS. I just love this lens for head/shoulder pictures

i've been using this alot lately for portraits and its very sharp and so nice and light too!
still i think i use the 70-200 more but its quite heavy and i've hurt my arm so shooting with the bigger lenses is hard at the moment so the 100 is a nice fallback
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ontarian

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Re: Your Go To Portrait Lens?
« Reply #32 on: November 21, 2011, 11:29:07 PM »
I only shoot 1.3 crop until the 1Dx comes out.  My favourite portrait prime is the FD 400mm 2.8 with my EdMika infinity focus 0.75mm EF-FD brass glassless adapter (soon to be replaced with the upcoming 0.5mm 90 degree rotated EF-FD brass glasses adapter). 

First test shots FD 400mm 2.8 L by Ontarian, on Flickr

For zooms I'd have to say the only one I still have, my trusty 70-200 2.8 L IS II.

If you had to choose both one zoom and one fixed lens as your go to portrait lens. What would they be?

Edit- I have purposely left this question open ended. I want to hear what you have and what your experiences are with both FF and crop sensors.

neuroanatomist

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Re: Your Go To Portrait Lens?
« Reply #33 on: November 21, 2011, 11:33:25 PM »
I believe a rough guide for the generally accepted focal length range for portrait is 85mm - 135mm equivalent on a full frame sensor....

The other zoom I have recently been considering as a portrait lens is the Canon 24-105mm F/4L IS. ... However, on a cropped sensor, 24-105mm becomes 38.4-168mm equivalent on full frame, which handily covers the 85 - 135 mm typical full frame range for portraits, with room to spare on both ends of the focal range, and I'd gain IS... As far as focal length goes, the Canon 24-105mm F/4L IS seems pretty ideal for portrait use on a cropped sensor. However, the downsides are: like my 70-200mm, F/4 isn't a particularly fast lens, so available light is a consideration...

Available light isn't the only consideration.  For portrait use in a studio, where you have pull-down or stand-supported backdrops, it would be fine.  But it's important to be aware that one consequence of that 38.4-168mm equivalent focal length is that to frame a shot where you'd be at 85mm on FF, you're equivalent focal length on APS-C is 136mm...and as a consequence, to get the 85mm framing you must be further away from your subject, which increases depth of field.

So...just as the 'crop factor' affects the effective focal length, it also affects the DoF - by the same 1.6x.  That means that for the same framing you'd get on FF, an f/4 lens on APS-C is equivalent to f/6.4 on FF.  That means very poor background blur unless you are very close to your subject and the background is well-separated.  Not that it can't be done...it's just not ideal. 
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koolman

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Re: Your Go To Portrait Lens?
« Reply #34 on: November 22, 2011, 03:03:26 AM »
Hands down, the 70-200 f/2.8is II or the 70-200 f/2.8is II or the 70-200 f/2.8is II. No contest.


A well known blogger Jem Schofiled had a rather interesting response to this question in an on line interview:

http://bit.ly/thoNoq

He claims that the 70-200 L II F4 is his choice over the 70-200 L II f 2.8 because it "holds focus" better.

Since I just sold my f4 to get the f2.8, was I wrong ... is he technically correct?

I know lens choice is subjective, but he seems to make a fairly bold statement.


If you listen to  Jem Schofiled's video - he is discussing his choice of lens for shooting VIDEO INTERVIEWS with a FF 5d2. The reason for using the 70-200 f/4 is that when he shoots the interview - he wants the subject to be able to move around and retain focus - hence he is forced to shoot at at least f/5 - to avoid a situation where if the subject for example leaned forward - they would appear blurred in the video. (thats what he means by "holds focus")

This has NOTHING to do with shooting stills portraits.

 
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whatta

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Re: Your Go To Portrait Lens?
« Reply #35 on: November 22, 2011, 04:04:48 AM »
efs 60/2.8 macro, very good portait lens, great value.
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neuroanatomist

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Re: Your Go To Portrait Lens?
« Reply #36 on: November 22, 2011, 07:01:37 AM »
Hands down, the 70-200 f/2.8is II or the 70-200 f/2.8is II or the 70-200 f/2.8is II. No contest.


A well known blogger Jem Schofiled had a rather interesting response to this question in an on line interview:

http://bit.ly/thoNoq

He claims that the 70-200 L II F4 is his choice over the 70-200 L II f 2.8 because it "holds focus" better.

Since I just sold my f4 to get the f2.8, was I wrong ... is he technically correct?

I know lens choice is subjective, but he seems to make a fairly bold statement.


If you listen to  Jem Schofiled's video - he is discussing his choice of lens for shooting VIDEO INTERVIEWS with a FF 5d2. The reason for using the 70-200 f/4 is that when he shoots the interview - he wants the subject to be able to move around and retain focus - hence he is forced to shoot at at least f/5 - to avoid a situation where if the subject for example leaned forward - they would appear blurred in the video. (thats what he means by "holds focus")


A 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II can be set to f/5 just like a 70-200mm f/4L IS, and I bet it would 'hold focus' just as well.  Imagine that.
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Re: Your Go To Portrait Lens?
« Reply #36 on: November 22, 2011, 07:01:37 AM »

Bob Howland

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Re: Your Go To Portrait Lens?
« Reply #37 on: November 22, 2011, 07:35:07 AM »
100 f/2.8 macro, non-L of a 5D. However, I have used the 50 f/1.4, 85 f/1.8 and 135 f/2 when shooting portraits of performers in rock and jazz groups in small clubs.

mjbehnke

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Re: Your Go To Portrait Lens?
« Reply #38 on: November 22, 2011, 11:18:05 PM »
OK, This might be a little off topic..... I see some of the posts saying that a 2.8 is really a stop slower on a 1.6 crop camera? I'm not sure how you figure that? Doesn't it still let the same amount of light go to the APS-C Sensor as it would a FF Sensor? ...And no, I really am not that smart!!  And this is my next question.... Does the EF-S 17-55 F2.8 suffer the same thing as the EF lenses on an APS-C even though it's made only for the smaller sensor?

Thanks in Advance.
Matthew
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Meh

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Re: Your Go To Portrait Lens?
« Reply #39 on: November 23, 2011, 12:10:07 AM »
OK, This might be a little off topic..... I see some of the posts saying that a 2.8 is really a stop slower on a 1.6 crop camera? I'm not sure how you figure that? Doesn't it still let the same amount of light go to the APS-C Sensor as it would a FF Sensor? ...And no, I really am not that smart!!  And this is my next question.... Does the EF-S 17-55 F2.8 suffer the same thing as the EF lenses on an APS-C even though it's made only for the smaller sensor?

Thanks in Advance.
Matthew

Which posts are you referring to?  Using a crop sensor affects angle of view and depth of field.  Exposure is the same.

wickidwombat

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Re: Your Go To Portrait Lens?
« Reply #40 on: November 23, 2011, 12:25:16 AM »
OK, This might be a little off topic..... I see some of the posts saying that a 2.8 is really a stop slower on a 1.6 crop camera? I'm not sure how you figure that? Doesn't it still let the same amount of light go to the APS-C Sensor as it would a FF Sensor? ...And no, I really am not that smart!!  And this is my next question.... Does the EF-S 17-55 F2.8 suffer the same thing as the EF lenses on an APS-C even though it's made only for the smaller sensor?

Thanks in Advance.
Matthew
neuro can probably explain it better but in simplest terms if you get a lens that works on both FF and crop let say a 17-40 f4L then fit it to each and frame the shot exactly the same so that both images filled each cameras view to the same extents. You would be standing closer to the subject using the FF and further away using the crop. Because you are closer to the subject you will have a shallower depth of field than the same lens taking the same shot on the crop since using the crop you are further away.

does that make sense?

since the EF-S 17-55 f2.8 only works on a crop body it behaves more like the 24-70 f2.8L so they are compared more to each other. So the 17-55 f2.8 doesnt suffer from anything
« Last Edit: November 23, 2011, 12:27:22 AM by wickidwombat »
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mjbehnke

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Re: Your Go To Portrait Lens?
« Reply #41 on: November 23, 2011, 12:38:50 AM »
Well.... This is one:

[/quote]
So...just as the 'crop factor' affects the effective focal length, it also affects the DoF - by the same 1.6x.  That means that for the same framing you'd get on FF, an f/4 lens on APS-C is equivalent to f/6.4 on FF.  That means very poor background blur unless you are very close to your subject and the background is well-separated.  Not that it can't be done...it's just not ideal.
[/quote]

If I am understanding it right, F4 on a Full Frame is about F6.4 on a APS-C? So, to truly get down to F2.8, I should go FF?  And the other part was, the EF-s 17-55 F2.8, is it like F4 on an APS-c, or is it trult F2.8?

Maybe I need to get to a website that explains this better..... 
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mjbehnke

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Re: Your Go To Portrait Lens?
« Reply #42 on: November 23, 2011, 12:42:03 AM »
OK, This might be a little off topic..... I see some of the posts saying that a 2.8 is really a stop slower on a 1.6 crop camera? I'm not sure how you figure that? Doesn't it still let the same amount of light go to the APS-C Sensor as it would a FF Sensor? ...And no, I really am not that smart!!  And this is my next question.... Does the EF-S 17-55 F2.8 suffer the same thing as the EF lenses on an APS-C even though it's made only for the smaller sensor?

Thanks in Advance.
Matthew
neuro can probably explain it better but in simplest terms if you get a lens that works on both FF and crop let say a 17-40 f4L then fit it to each and frame the shot exactly the same so that both images filled each cameras view to the same extents. You would be standing closer to the subject using the FF and further away using the crop. Because you are closer to the subject you will have a shallower depth of field than the same lens taking the same shot on the crop since using the crop you are further away.

does that make sense?

since the EF-S 17-55 f2.8 only works on a crop body it behaves more like the 24-70 f2.8L so they are compared more to each other. So the 17-55 f2.8 doesnt suffer from anything


OK, That makes sense, since the 1.6 crop factor "brings things in closer" than shooting with a full frame......

Thanks very much for the Simple Terms!
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Re: Your Go To Portrait Lens?
« Reply #42 on: November 23, 2011, 12:42:03 AM »

briansquibb

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Re: Your Go To Portrait Lens?
« Reply #43 on: November 23, 2011, 01:46:29 AM »
Unless you are going to focus/recompose the set AF mode to Servo to hold focus that way. That way you can move as well as the subject.

Makes it easier when using a prime to get the framing right by the manual zoom (one step back and forward)

The 70-200 f/2.8 II makes a good lens for shooting those candids on both ff and 1.6



koolman

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Re: Your Go To Portrait Lens?
« Reply #44 on: November 23, 2011, 02:58:26 AM »
Hands down, the 70-200 f/2.8is II or the 70-200 f/2.8is II or the 70-200 f/2.8is II. No contest.


A well known blogger Jem Schofiled had a rather interesting response to this question in an on line interview:

http://bit.ly/thoNoq

He claims that the 70-200 L II F4 is his choice over the 70-200 L II f 2.8 because it "holds focus" better.

Since I just sold my f4 to get the f2.8, was I wrong ... is he technically correct?

I know lens choice is subjective, but he seems to make a fairly bold statement.


If you listen to  Jem Schofiled's video - he is discussing his choice of lens for shooting VIDEO INTERVIEWS with a FF 5d2. The reason for using the 70-200 f/4 is that when he shoots the interview - he wants the subject to be able to move around and retain focus - hence he is forced to shoot at at least f/5 - to avoid a situation where if the subject for example leaned forward - they would appear blurred in the video. (thats what he means by "holds focus")


A 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II can be set to f/5 just like a 70-200mm f/4L IS, and I bet it would 'hold focus' just as well.  Imagine that.


Of course you can stop down any lens. He was saying that there was no advantage to the larger heavier 2.8 - hence he chose the smaller lighter f/4
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Re: Your Go To Portrait Lens?
« Reply #44 on: November 23, 2011, 02:58:26 AM »