October 25, 2014, 03:14:31 PM

Author Topic: Camera bag for camping  (Read 10190 times)

dcm

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Re: Camera bag for camping
« Reply #15 on: July 17, 2014, 09:54:01 PM »
Thanks for the tip on camera inserts.  In addition to MountainSmith I found "camera inserts" in various sizes from Timbuk2, Ape Case, and others.  Looks like a nice way to keep your gear all together in one pouch you can lift out of the pack.

In the past I've used some LowePro cases.  When going ultralight I wrap equipment in my extra socks, puffy, sit/sleep pad, etc. which actually works pretty well - no extra weight.  Guess I'll have to do some research before my next trip.  Not sure I want to carry much extra weight.
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Re: Camera bag for camping
« Reply #15 on: July 17, 2014, 09:54:01 PM »

NancyP

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Re: Camera bag for camping
« Reply #16 on: July 18, 2014, 12:03:56 PM »
Another approach, depending on the terrain, would be to carry a chest-mount camera with most-used lens (Cotton Carrier vest, which works just fine with backpacks, the mount does not interfere with the sternum strap) and for accessibility, put next most used lens in a lens case attached to the pack's Molle strapping or equivalent, and extra battery, card, etc in a pocket. Lens you know will be used least can be wrapped up in a cloth and stuffed in with the soft gear. Cotton Carrier vest is wonderful for DSLRs and I suppose for small cameras. The Cotton Carrier people also have a small-camera mount that attaches to your own pack's shoulder straps.

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Re: Camera bag for camping
« Reply #17 on: July 18, 2014, 03:13:29 PM »
This is what I'm thinking to get, this one is expensive but there is a cheaper one in same brand. http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1021054-REG/clik_elite_ce610bl_contrejour_40_camera_backpack.html

RustyTheGeek

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Re: Camera bag for camping
« Reply #18 on: July 18, 2014, 04:29:19 PM »
you are much better off using a proper backpack and putting your camera gear in it. or strap a small camera back to your backpack. you will not have a good time trying to pack weight in a camera bag. i just put my lenses in their soft cases in the lid of my gregory pack, and hang my camera in a dry-sack (brooks bag) off a shoulder strap, or on a capture clip if its dry out.

you arent going to get a hiking backpack on as carryon

Big Ditto!  In this case, it is hiking/camping FIRST PRIORITY, photography DISTANT SECOND.  Keep yourself comfortable and safe first, then consider the photography.

This means buying everything for the camping first, especially the backpack.  Hiking with the wrong or improper fitting pack is a huge mistake.  DO NOT BUY A PHOTOGRAPHY PACK FOR CAMPING!!

I just finished a 70+ mile 10 day trek at Philmont Scout Ranch in New Mexico (2nd time).  I used a Kelty RedCloud 90 backpack.  Depending on Food and Water variables, I carried between 40 - 60 lbs on the trail and about 6 lbs of that was the camera gear.  I carried a Canon SL1 with a Tamron 18-270 lens, a 10-22 EF-S lens and extra batteries.  The extra lens was in a LowePro lens bag inside a dry bag inside my pack where ever it would fit.  The camera hung flat against my chest from a custom made rig of super magnets and flex straps that were connected to my back pack shoulder straps.  When I wasn't hiking, the camera simply hung from a climbing carbiner that hung from my belt at hip level.  I also had a dry bag in case I needed to protect the camera but I never used it.

In other words, keep it simple.  Don't try to take all your gear, just the essentials.  Abundant water is more important weight to carry than camera gear.
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Re: Camera bag for camping
« Reply #19 on: July 18, 2014, 04:36:42 PM »
This is what I'm thinking to get, this one is expensive but there is a cheaper one in same brand. http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1021054-REG/clik_elite_ce610bl_contrejour_40_camera_backpack.html
What kind of trip are you taking?  A 35 Liter pack isn't very big and it will be even smaller after you put in camera gear.  A 35 liter pack is usually only big enough for warm weather weekend trips.  Will you have to carry a tent, sleep gear, etc or are you just doing day hikes?  I really hope you are already an experienced hiker/camper so you know what you're doing on the trail.  Remember that back country pro photographers sometimes hire assistants to help them carry gear when necessary.  Don't over do the gear carrying it by yourself!
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NancyP

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Re: Camera bag for camping
« Reply #20 on: July 18, 2014, 04:43:41 PM »
Well, yes, water is #1 of the "10 essentials".   ;D  Especially when you are sweating it out like crazy. I have thought about getting a pack bladder for the extra water, but I have worried about the bladder breaking or leaking onto the camera equipment. I like at least one bottle on a carabinier hanging off my belt - very easy to get at, and I remember to drink whether I think I need it or not.

Concerning size of pack, 60 L, plus a bear canister hanging off the pack or under a floating lid, seems about right volume-wise for long weekend  trips.

At least one pro photographer, granted, a large format photographer, uses llamas as pack animals, and the recent Backpacker magazine had a funny article about goats as pack animals. (hint - goats are more stubborn than mules and donkeys).

RustyTheGeek

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Re: Camera bag for camping
« Reply #21 on: July 18, 2014, 04:55:30 PM »
Carrying plenty of water is dependent on the environment, particularly the temps and the availability of water along the trail.  I carried between 4L and 6L of water depending on whether trail camps were dry or not.  We also carried a Katydyn Water Filter and purification tablets as backup.

Everything in your pack should be protected from water in dry bags, ziplock bags, etc, esp your sleep gear.  If your water bladder spang a leak, that should be no different than if the pack fell into a river or stream or got drenched in a rain storm.

The external pockets and configuration of my Kelty backpack allows me to use my MSR Dromedary 3L bladder on the outside of my pack but otherwise it would be on the inside like most other folks.
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Re: Camera bag for camping
« Reply #21 on: July 18, 2014, 04:55:30 PM »

Lloyd

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Re: Camera bag for camping
« Reply #22 on: July 18, 2014, 06:24:22 PM »
I have been using a Gossamer Gear Mariposa backpack which is an older version of the newer http://gossamergear.com/packs/backpacks/mariposa-ultralight-backpack-all-bundle-dyneema.html that has a removable hip belt.  When bringing photography equipment, I replace the hip belt with a Think tank belt and attach my Think Tank holsters, lens bags and accessory bags as needed to the exposed side portions of the belt.  This gives me an ultralight backpack with the ability to add photo gear as needed and the camera and lenses are readily accessible in the side holsters.
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RustyTheGeek

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Re: Camera bag for camping
« Reply #23 on: July 18, 2014, 06:48:48 PM »
I have been using a Gossamer Gear Mariposa backpack which is an older version of the newer http://gossamergear.com/packs/backpacks/mariposa-ultralight-backpack-all-bundle-dyneema.html that has a removable hip belt.  When bringing photography equipment, I replace the hip belt with a Think tank belt and attach my Think Tank holsters, lens bags and accessory bags as needed to the exposed side portions of the belt.  This gives me an ultralight backpack with the ability to add photo gear as needed and the camera and lenses are readily accessible in the side holsters.
Interesting!  What about when it rains?
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mustafaakarsu

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Re: Camera bag for camping
« Reply #24 on: July 18, 2014, 07:24:57 PM »
This is what I'm thinking to get, this one is expensive but there is a cheaper one in same brand. http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1021054-REG/clik_elite_ce610bl_contrejour_40_camera_backpack.html
What kind of trip are you taking?  A 35 Liter pack isn't very big and it will be even smaller after you put in camera gear.  A 35 liter pack is usually only big enough for warm weather weekend trips.  Will you have to carry a tent, sleep gear, etc or are you just doing day hikes?  I really hope you are already an experienced hiker/camper so you know what you're doing on the trail.  Remember that back country pro photographers sometimes hire assistants to help them carry gear when necessary.  Don't over do the gear carrying it by yourself!

It's not serious camping, basically we are driving nearby the location we want to do camping, we are trekking around with backpacks but for sleeping we are going back to car to take tents and stuff. So it's not serious camping.

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Re: Camera bag for camping
« Reply #25 on: July 18, 2014, 07:41:45 PM »
This is what I'm thinking to get, this one is expensive but there is a cheaper one in same brand. http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1021054-REG/clik_elite_ce610bl_contrejour_40_camera_backpack.html
What kind of trip are you taking?  A 35 Liter pack isn't very big and it will be even smaller after you put in camera gear.  A 35 liter pack is usually only big enough for warm weather weekend trips.  Will you have to carry a tent, sleep gear, etc or are you just doing day hikes?  I really hope you are already an experienced hiker/camper so you know what you're doing on the trail.  Remember that back country pro photographers sometimes hire assistants to help them carry gear when necessary.  Don't over do the gear carrying it by yourself!

It's not serious camping, basically we are driving nearby the location we want to do camping, we are trekking around with backpacks but for sleeping we are going back to car to take tents and stuff. So it's not serious camping.
That makes a world of difference!  If I'm not mistaken, that means that you aren't really camping out of your backpack, you are car camping and day hiking.  That means you're likely carrying mostly camera equipment, a couple liters of water and some snacks.  So I'm guessing you're day pack hiking a few miles at most primarily to see the sights, enjoy the group companionship and take a lot of pictures.

I still think buying an expensive photography specific backpack is overkill and fairly useless as a true hiking+camping backpack but to each his own.  You can always put camera gear in to a serious hiking backpack but it's hard (if not impossible) to take an expensive photography backpack and use it for serious hiking.

Regardless, have a great time and let us know what you finally decide!   :)
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Logan

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Re: Camera bag for camping
« Reply #26 on: July 18, 2014, 08:09:01 PM »
This is what I'm thinking to get, this one is expensive but there is a cheaper one in same brand. http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1021054-REG/clik_elite_ce610bl_contrejour_40_camera_backpack.html
What kind of trip are you taking?  A 35 Liter pack isn't very big and it will be even smaller after you put in camera gear.  A 35 liter pack is usually only big enough for warm weather weekend trips.  Will you have to carry a tent, sleep gear, etc or are you just doing day hikes?  I really hope you are already an experienced hiker/camper so you know what you're doing on the trail.  Remember that back country pro photographers sometimes hire assistants to help them carry gear when necessary.  Don't over do the gear carrying it by yourself!

It's not serious camping, basically we are driving nearby the location we want to do camping, we are trekking around with backpacks but for sleeping we are going back to car to take tents and stuff. So it's not serious camping.

oop sorry, disregard my post then. i have a lowepro flipside that i use for dayhikes, but its more for cities because of the excellent theft-proof opening. you might be better off with something you can access without taking off though.

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Re: Camera bag for camping
« Reply #27 on: July 19, 2014, 06:50:54 AM »
Quote

You can always put camera gear in to a serious hiking backpack but it's hard (if not impossible) to take an expensive photography backpack and use it for serious hiking.


I could not agree more. I've been using a F-stop Loka for a few years now, and while it's a great backpack and probably one of the finest camera backpacks available, I feel a lot more comfortable with my Arcteryx Astral 65 even if I put twice as much weight in it. There is a world of difference, at least to my me and my back. I would say that camera backpack manufacturers have a very long way to go, when it comes to ergonomics.  I'm thinking of adding a Lowepro Toploader AW 50 to my kit, now that I have sold the Loka, to be chucked in with the rest of my hiking kit. It should hold a L-plated 6D with a wide angle zoom nice and snugly.
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Re: Camera bag for camping
« Reply #27 on: July 19, 2014, 06:50:54 AM »

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Re: Camera bag for camping
« Reply #28 on: July 21, 2014, 07:34:31 AM »
Quote

You can always put camera gear in to a serious hiking backpack but it's hard (if not impossible) to take an expensive photography backpack and use it for serious hiking.


I could not agree more. I've been using a F-stop Loka for a few years now, and while it's a great backpack and probably one of the finest camera backpacks available, I feel a lot more comfortable with my Arcteryx Astral 65 even if I put twice as much weight in it. There is a world of difference, at least to my me and my back. I would say that camera backpack manufacturers have a very long way to go, when it comes to ergonomics.  I'm thinking of adding a Lowepro Toploader AW 50 to my kit, now that I have sold the Loka, to be chucked in with the rest of my hiking kit. It should hold a L-plated 6D with a wide angle zoom nice and snugly.

Generally I agree that trekking/mountaineering-specific packs are the best available in terms of wearing comfort. But the comparison of the F-Stop Loka with the Arc'teryx Altra is not really fair. The Loka is a 37 litre pack with not that much padding on the hip belt and the shoulder straps. It is not meant to carry 30 kilos like the Altra (which is a fabulous pack by the way). If you try a Tilopa BC (48 litres) or a Satori EXP (62 litres) you might get a rather different experience: both packs are very well constructed and padded so that you can carry your 20-30 kilos of photo gear, mountaineering stuff, clothes, food etc. quite comfortably. It's still heavy to lug around 20 kilos though…  ;D
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Re: Camera bag for camping
« Reply #29 on: July 21, 2014, 10:14:21 AM »
Quote

You can always put camera gear in to a serious hiking backpack but it's hard (if not impossible) to take an expensive photography backpack and use it for serious hiking.


I could not agree more. I've been using a F-stop Loka for a few years now, and while it's a great backpack and probably one of the finest camera backpacks available, I feel a lot more comfortable with my Arcteryx Astral 65 even if I put twice as much weight in it. There is a world of difference, at least to my me and my back. I would say that camera backpack manufacturers have a very long way to go, when it comes to ergonomics.  I'm thinking of adding a Lowepro Toploader AW 50 to my kit, now that I have sold the Loka, to be chucked in with the rest of my hiking kit. It should hold a L-plated 6D with a wide angle zoom nice and snugly.

Generally I agree that trekking/mountaineering-specific packs are the best available in terms of wearing comfort. But the comparison of the F-Stop Loka with the Arc'teryx Altra is not really fair. The Loka is a 37 litre pack with not that much padding on the hip belt and the shoulder straps. It is not meant to carry 30 kilos like the Altra (which is a fabulous pack by the way). If you try a Tilopa BC (48 litres) or a Satori EXP (62 litres) you might get a rather different experience: both packs are very well constructed and padded so that you can carry your 20-30 kilos of photo gear, mountaineering stuff, clothes, food etc. quite comfortably. It's still heavy to lug around 20 kilos though…  ;D

Meh... 20 kilos (44 lbs) isn't that bad... but 30 kilos (66 lbs) is getting heavy!   ;)

IMHO - Once you pass about 20 kilos (44 lbs) every kilo (~2 lbs) after that becomes more and more significant.  And don't forget the general rule that you shouldn't carry more than approx 1/3 of your body weight.  I weigh between 172 - 178 lbs so that means I shouldn't carry more than about 55 - 60 lbs for long distances.  I have carried more than that for miles and it does add up after a while regardless of how well your pack fit is dialed in and optimized.  Make sure you have decent hiking boots and socks that are broken in and comfortable!

And I think I read somewhere in this thread that heavy gear goes in the bottom of the pack.  That's actually incorrect.  The heavy gear goes as close to your body as possible towards the middle/top of the pack so that the weight is transferred more directly through the pack frame to your hips and legs.  If it's in the bottom or outside swinging it pulls you off balance and is not carried well.
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Re: Camera bag for camping
« Reply #29 on: July 21, 2014, 10:14:21 AM »